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Northside Development?


MiDTOWNeR

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Any info out there about what may be going up?

A pretty big warehouse near the N Main/Hogan st intersection is being cleared. The lot is pretty large and has a prime downtown view. I was curious what may be going up...some new homes have gone up recently in the area, and looks like there are plans for other homes.

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New development is starting to go in over there because developers can still get good deals on the land. There is a new townhome development going in on Sharmin, off of Fulton, and I have a listing on a 22,000 sq ft tract off of Fulton that developers are circling on. I expect we will see a lot more stuff in there over the next few years.

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Yeah,

and the light rail line and BRT extension will make that area prime for residential.

I think the north of downtown area (not using NoDo) will be creat urban creation. They have the potential to have a little more density than the heights since they don't have prevailing lot sizes.

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Yeah,

and the light rail line and BRT extension will make that area prime for residential.

I think the north of downtown area (not using NoDo) will be creat urban creation. They have the potential to have a little more density than the heights since they don't have prevailing lot sizes.

I thought the light rail through that area was canned? Aren;t they doing some sort of dedicated bus lane. ANy one have other info?

Thanks

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I thought the light rail through that area was canned? Aren;t they doing some sort of dedicated bus lane. ANy one have other info?

Thanks

The last plans I saw had the intermodal station at N. Main and Burnett. They extended the Red Line and from there it's BRT. It would also be the new Greyhound station, commuter rail terminus-sort of like a central station for all kinds of transit to be accessable to each other.

Here's a site on the subject:

http://www.houstonintermodal.org/

B)

Edited by nmainguy
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I thought the light rail through that area was canned? Aren;t they doing some sort of dedicated bus lane. ANy one have other info?

Thanks

current plan is to extend the redline to the new planned multimodal bus/train terminal just north of downtown, in the area of the small main street tunnel that currently exists there.

But yea, the continuation of the red line past that northbound was canned.

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current plan is to extend the redline to the new planned multimodal bus/train terminal just north of downtown, in the area of the small main street tunnel that currently exists there.

But yea, the continuation of the red line past that northbound was canned.

Thank you everyone for the information provided thus far.

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  • 2 months later...
Good link.

Yeah. It supposed to be BRT north of the Intermodal station. But the area seems like a good place to have LRT run through with a dense urban environment growing around it.

Sorry but in reading the preceding posts I think the dense urban city life we all hope for does not mix successfully with a Greyhound and "International" bus station.

Recently in one of the forums there was discussion about what types of new businesses signify urban renewal (e.g. banks) and which types indicate urban decline (pawn shops). I think unfortunately that passenger bus stations are at the top of the urban decline list.

While I am well aware of the need to provide all peoples with transportation options, a Greyhound station incorporated into the intermodal center will stunt growth in the area (Just ask anyone within a couple blocks of main in Midtown).

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Sorry but in reading the preceding posts I think the dense urban city life we all hope for does not mix successfully with a Greyhound and "International" bus station.

Recently in one of the forums there was discussion about what types of new businesses signify urban renewal (e.g. banks) and which types indicate urban decline (pawn shops). I think unfortunately that passenger bus stations are at the top of the urban decline list.

While I am well aware of the need to provide all peoples with transportation options, a Greyhound station incorporated into the intermodal center will stunt growth in the area (Just ask anyone within a couple blocks of main in Midtown).

I reluctantly agree. In theory, a centrally located bus station should be a real asset. The reality is that the Greyhound station in Houston is, in effect, the first door through which many releasees (is that a word?) from Texas Department of Corrections pass on their way to a new life.

Increased security is just one factor in improving the conditions around bus stations. We also need to address the issues of recently released convicts. Contempt and indifference hasn't worked out very well.

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I reluctantly agree. In theory, a centrally located bus station should be a real asset. The reality is that the Greyhound station in Houston is, in effect, the first door through which many releasees (is that a word?) from Texas Department of Corrections pass on their way to a new life.

Increased security is just one factor in improving the conditions around bus stations. We also need to address the issues of recently released convicts. Contempt and indifference hasn't worked out very well.

I also agree somewhat. However, the NY/NJ Port Authority Bus Station is located adjacent to the new NY Times bldg in Manhattan. It's very clean and people aren't allowed to linger about inside or out. Maybe law enforcement has much to do with that.

B)

01_10_01a_SB.jpg

Edited by nmainguy
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December 20, 2005 - Cypress Real Estate Advisors of Austin has purchased the old Hardy Yards railroad property, just north of downtown Houston. The 45-acre parcel, located between North Main and Hardy streets, was used for locomotive refueling and repair for 100 years and significant environmental work will have to be done before redevelopment can occur. The site has outstanding potential as as location for apartments, townhomes or a gated community. The seller was investor Avi Ron, who bought the property from Union Pacific about five years ago. Kelley Parker of Cushman & Wakefield represented Ron.

Austin firm wheels into real estate action with acquisition of downtown rail yards

Jennifer Dawson

An Austin-based company has staked out a claim close to the flurry of real estate activity in transit.

Cypress Real Estate Advisors last month bought 46 acres worth of old railroad yards just north of downtown for a redevelopment project.

The company acquired the Hardy Yards property from Avi Ron for an undisclosed amount. Sources peg the sales price in the $28 million to $30 million range.

John Kiltz, a Cypress principal, says proximity to downtown and the prospect of major transit improvements nearby attracted the firm to the site across the railroad tracks from land recently purchased by the Metropolitan Transit Authority.

There are no initial plans to joint venture with Metro on the site, Kiltz says, but the two parties have talked about the area's future.

"We don't have any type of agreement with them," Kiltz says. "Because (our site) is so large, we can create our own world."

The developer will likely seek out joint venture partners to develop portions of the property. Kiltz says midrise residential buildings are a possibility, but retail development probably wouldn't work.

"We have a strong bias toward doing residential there," says Kiltz.

The Hardy Yards site requires substantial environmental remediation work that will take several months before redevelopment can begin.

Kiltz says development could start in about two years following the environmental work.

Meanwhile, land planner Elkus Manfredi Architects has been hired to help determine the best use for the land. Boston-based Elkus Manfredi has done such high-end projects as Victory in Dallas and Time Warner Center in New York.

A tax increment reinvestment zone has been proposed for the area, but that designation is in limbo. The Cypress redevelopment is not contingent on the TIRZ status, Kiltz says.

"We bought our property without needing the benefit of the TIRZ," Kiltz says.

B. Kelley Parker III of Cushman & Wakefield of Texas Inc., who represented Ron on the sale, says that the previous owner will not miss working on the TIRZ approval process.

"I think they got to a point where they were ready to move on and let somebody else deal with the planners and political issues that go along with this stuff." Parker says. "They don't like to play politics."

Parker speculates Cypress will move forward quicker on the property.

"The development of that area will speed up a little bit because of their involvement and expertise," Parker says.

Cypress has developed multiple master-planned communities in Florida and Texas, but Kiltz says the firm is shifting focus to urban properties.

While Cypress does some development, such as condos, the firm likes to provide capital or land to other developers for apartments, condominiums and townhouses.

The Austin firm has been doing projects in Houston for 10 years.

Most recently, Cypress provided equity to Midway Cos. on the redevelopment of the old Town & Country Mall site.

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