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Dakota79

South Main Innovation District in Midtown (Former Sears)

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The building's parking lot is now full of worker's trucks, I'm assuming they are going to town on the inside of the building while the heat has been causing hallucinations in people who dare to go outside at 1 pm.  A lane of wheeler has been closed the last few days early in the morning as they move stuff into the building. Makes you kind of wonder how much work they actually have to do on the outside.

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8 minutes ago, Brandon55 said:

 Give the gest of the article.

 

Basically they are worried that the Ion will displace the huge homeless population in that area and instead they want the Ion to house the homeless, provide them public restrooms, and give jobs to the people of the area.

 

A Community Benefits Agreement with the impacted residents and stakeholders could more adequately address these issues, if it includes on-site affordable and assistive housing, first-source hiring for permanent employment, harm reduction-based addiction centers, health care and mental health resources, work training services, funds for small business development, and public bathrooms. Rather than displacing the homeless into precarious housing situations around the city, this project is a valuable opportunity to provide these vulnerable Houstonians with needed supportive housing and resources in the neighborhood that this project will significantly impact.

 

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4 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

Basically they are worried that the Ion will displace the huge homeless population in that area and instead they want the Ion to house the homeless, provide them public restrooms, and give jobs to the people of the area.

 

They also want the Ion coalition to take preemptive action against Third Ward gentrification:

 

Quote

The Ion will almost inevitably accelerate predatory homebuying and development in nearby Third Ward, a historically African American neighborhood. The development’s leaders have invoked the importance of supporting and involving communities such as Third Ward but they have not proposed measures to protect Third Ward residents from rising property values and displacement.

[...]

If the Innovation Corridor partners are sincerely interested in benefiting Third Ward and communities like it, they would agree to provide protections against gentrification, support local businesses and art, provide living-wage jobs and secure generational wealth through housing.

 

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29 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Basically they are worried that the Ion will displace the huge homeless population in that area and instead they want the Ion to house the homeless, provide them public restrooms, and give jobs to the people of the area.

 

 

So are they protesting the I45 realignment?  I'm sure that will displace more homeless than The Ion.  

Edited by BeerNut
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You know, I recognize that's snark, but it's actually a genuinely great idea. College campus already have all sorts of services for students that would be beneficial to the homeless.

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42 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

I wonder if the students would be willing to provide the homeless with housing on the Rice campus. Perhaps they could make their dorms more "inclusive" and bring the homeless in to live with them?

 

 

Great idea!  Let's see them put their words into action.  There are a bunch of nice covered walkways and other sheltered areas on Rice's campus.  Invite the homeless over there. Problem solved.

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1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

I wonder if the students would be willing to provide the homeless with housing on the Rice campus. Perhaps they could make their dorms more "inclusive" and bring the homeless in to live with them?

 

 

Maybe they can also let the homeless into the coffee shops they go to that are near the 59 in downtown. There are restrooms in there as well.

 

I don't know about you, but when I want to learn about homelessness or what to do with them, you know who I listen too, the top 1% who go to places like Rice, and who are from the ages of 18-22. You won't believe how wise and smart they are!

1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Basically they are worried that the Ion will displace the huge homeless population in that area and instead they want the Ion to house the homeless, provide them public restrooms, and give jobs to the people of the area.

 

 

 

 

 

I also think its hilarious that this has been an issue for years, but NOW they care. NOW they want to do something about it.

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Rice is a university, so you'd have to expect some type of student opposition to its actions from a segment of its students.  This segment, even with Rice's relatively small enrollment, appears to be quite small: Facebook indicates it has only 39 followers and 38 "likes."   

 

The one point the group makes with which I am somewhat sympathetic is Fiesta's presence in what would otherwise be a food desert.  I am curious if Rice would explore a Buffalo Heights-type development with a grocery store in the Innovation District in the longer term.  I suspect there would be a benefit to attract additional density around the store.

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16 minutes ago, houstontexasjack said:

Rice is a university, so you'd have to expect some type of student opposition to its actions from a segment of its students.  This segment, even with Rice's relatively small enrollment, appears to be quite small: Facebook indicates it has only 39 followers and 38 "likes."   

 

 

It does seem like just a few students trying to build their resume for grad school, and would probably go away if the Chronicle would stop giving them coverage. Nancy Sarnoff devoted a whole episode of her Looped In podcast to this group.

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59 minutes ago, houstontexasjack said:

Rice is a university, so you'd have to expect some type of student opposition to its actions from a segment of its students.  This segment, even with Rice's relatively small enrollment, appears to be quite small: Facebook indicates it has only 39 followers and 38 "likes."   

 

The one point the group makes with which I am somewhat sympathetic is Fiesta's presence in what would otherwise be a food desert.  I am curious if Rice would explore a Buffalo Heights-type development with a grocery store in the Innovation District in the longer term.  I suspect there would be a benefit to attract additional density around the store.

 

Part of my issue too is exactly this....nobody knows the full scope of Rice's plans yet. Why can't we just wait to see what happens?

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23 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

Part of my issue too is exactly this....nobody knows the full scope of Rice's plans yet. Why can't we just wait to see what happens?

Since when has anybody on HAIF wanted to wait to see plans unfurled. 😉  

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1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

It does seem like just a few students trying to build their resume for grad school, and would probably go away if the Chronicle would stop giving them coverage. Nancy Sarnoff devoted a whole episode of her Looped In podcast to this group.

It's all about the clicks nowadays. 

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1 hour ago, houstontexasjack said:

Rice is a university, so you'd have to expect some type of student opposition to its actions from a segment of its students.  This segment, even with Rice's relatively small enrollment, appears to be quite small: Facebook indicates it has only 39 followers and 38 "likes."   

 

The one point the group makes with which I am somewhat sympathetic is Fiesta's presence in what would otherwise be a food desert.  I am curious if Rice would explore a Buffalo Heights-type development with a grocery store in the Innovation District in the longer term.  I suspect there would be a benefit to attract additional density around the store.

 

Having heard that Rice "begged" Fiesta to stay, I would imagine that Rice is indeed exploring including a grocery in their long-term plans.

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1 hour ago, Houston19514 said:

 

Having heard that Rice "begged" Fiesta to stay, I would imagine that Rice is indeed exploring including a grocery in their long-term plans.

 

Do you know why Rice begged them to stay? How much longer are they there for?

 

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1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Do you know why Rice begged them to stay? How much longer are they there for?

 

 

I don't know for sure.  The implication was that they want to supportive of the neighborhood .

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9 hours ago, Luminare said:
11 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

 

I also think its hilarious that this has been an issue for years, but NOW they care. NOW they want to do something about it.


Agree. I didn't hear much squawking when the tent city under 59 was cleared out and fenced off a year or so ago, which probably displaced more people than are currently frequenting the area.

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ah I'm on the fence.  on one hand  , there are people  who need help. On the other  many of them at that area are not homeless. I know  I dealt with them for years when I was assigned to Hermann park and other parks in the area. What happens is Drug dealers mix into the groups because they know that  they are social outcasts. So many people  try to avoid prolonged eye contact including the cops.  it a far more complex issue that most would admit. 

 

You don't want to persecute a person for being homeless. However you cant be naive  either and pretend that all of them are down on their luck. unfortunately  clustering like that only invites, drugs , violence and a ton of other crimes.  sadly many of them also cluster to protect themselves  from those very things... like I said complex.

Edited by Brandon55
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8 hours ago, Brandon55 said:

ah I'm on the fence.  on one hand  , there are people  who need help. On the other  many of them at that area are not homeless. . . Drug dealers mix into the groups. . .

Yes, for all it’s progress,  Midtown still has a healthy population of drug dealers that prey on the homeless.  However, if our community finds a way to successfully treat the homeless and get them off the street, the drug pushers would likely disappear, too.

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9 hours ago, Brandon55 said:

ah I'm on the fence.  on one hand  , there are people  who need help. On the other  many of them at that area are not homeless. I know  I dealt with them for years when I was assigned to Hermann park and other parks in the area. What happens is Drug dealers mix into the groups because they know that  they are social outcasts. So many people  try to avoid prolonged eye contact including the cops.  it a far more complex issue that most would admit. 

 

You don't want to persecute a person for being homeless. However you cant be naive  either and pretend that all of them are down on their luck. unfortunately  clustering like that only invites, drugs , violence and a ton of other crimes.  sadly many of them also cluster to protect themselves  from those very things... like I said complex.

 

What are you on the fence about? Do you think that the Ion development should have to house them, provide them jobs, etc.?

 

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WE are not alone in this epidemic of street people and there are a lot of cities that are having to cope with this very same problem.

Unfortunately there are a lot of people out there that should probably be receiving mental health treatment but you can't force them and most don't want the help. 

There are also a good many that are addicted to drugs, and alcohol. Our health services especially the emergency fire and ambulance personnel are heavily burdened and often 

returning to pick up the same person who has just been released from a hospital only to be in need again. A lot of this has to do with the changing of the mental health laws that put many of these people back on the streets. Unfortunately no-one has seemed to come up with a solution that's equitable for all. 

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31 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

What are you on the fence about? Do you think that the Ion development should have to house them, provide them jobs, etc.?

 

No , I dont think that the responsibility of private sector. That on is on us( society) 

32 minutes ago, bobruss said:

WE are not alone in this epidemic of street people and there are a lot of cities that are having to cope with this very same problem.

Unfortunately there are a lot of people out there that should probably be receiving mental health treatment but you can't force them and most don't want the help. 

There are also a good many that are addicted to drugs, and alcohol. Our health services especially the emergency fire and ambulance personnel are heavily burdened and often 

returning to pick up the same person who has just been released from a hospital only to be in need again. A lot of this has to do with the changing of the mental health laws that put many of these people back on the streets. Unfortunately no-one has seemed to come up with a solution that's equitable for all. 

Hit the nail on the head.

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2 hours ago, bobruss said:

WE are not alone in this epidemic of street people and there are a lot of cities that are having to cope with this very same problem.

Unfortunately there are a lot of people out there that should probably be receiving mental health treatment but you can't force them and most don't want the help. 

There are also a good many that are addicted to drugs, and alcohol. Our health services especially the emergency fire and ambulance personnel are heavily burdened and often 

returning to pick up the same person who has just been released from a hospital only to be in need again. A lot of this has to do with the changing of the mental health laws that put many of these people back on the streets. Unfortunately no-one has seemed to come up with a solution that's equitable for all. 

I apologize because we’re getting off topic here.  But I will add in just this one comment on what is an important side topic.  I have traveled to Japan — most recently in late ‘18 — and see a very different picture.  I have been all over that city and beyond.  All kinds of neighborhoods.  Rich, poor, touristy and local.  I don’t remember seeing ANY homeless people.  The sidewalks are clean.  Their streets are safe (so safe, in fact, that people park their bikes on the sidewalk and don’t lock them).  I’m guessing that Japan has its share of poor, mentally ill people.  What are they doing differently to help these people so that they don’t live in filth on the streets, turn to drugs and resort to petty theft for money?  Maybe the answer to the homeless problem at home has already been answered. Maybe we just need to study and adopt best-practices from others.  Just a thought.  

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1 hour ago, MarathonMan said:

I have traveled to Japan — most recently in late ‘18 — and see a very different picture.  I have been all over that city and beyond.  All kinds of neighborhoods.  Rich, poor, touristy and local.  I don’t remember seeing ANY homeless people.  The sidewalks are clean.  Their streets are safe (so safe, in fact, that people park their bikes on the sidewalk and don’t lock them).  I’m guessing that Japan has its share of poor, mentally ill people.  What are they doing differently to help these people so that they don’t live in filth on the streets, turn to drugs and resort to petty theft for money?  Maybe the answer to the homeless problem at home has already been answered. Maybe we just need to study and adopt best-practices from others.  Just a thought.  

 

You won't see homeless people in China, either.  In both countries, they are taken care of by their families.  Our culture is different, with much weaker family ties, so in the US they don't have the support network from their family that they would have in some other countries.

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32 minutes ago, rechlin said:

 

You won't see homeless people in China, either.  In both countries, they are taken care of by their families. 

 

Beg pardon?

According to many sources, there are hundreds of thousands of homeless people in China.

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I don't know if anyone rolls through this area often, but the homeless in the area have been completely changed since a year ago, starting with the breaking up of the camp. That left many of those individuals loitering in the area up until maybe a month and half ago, when I really noticed that some of the homeless that I had gotten to know (yes I'm that guy, I'm sorry) no longer aggressively asked for money from cars when I was at the lights. Some of them seemed to have moved on because I don't see them in the mornings or nights anymore.

 

I think something has already changed either in the way the police have been handling them (they are out there kind of frequently) or because of pressure from Rice/the neighborhood associations. My neighborhood associated did mention that they have been working with area shelters/police officers to help the population shift from that spot under 59 by Fiesta. I second that notion about the drug dealers though, I always feel bad when I see the older G's out there with the backpacks counting money with the zombie'd out people sitting next to him. 

 

Or im completely wrong and its just too hot so they aint wanting to come outside. 

 

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1 hour ago, rechlin said:

 

You won't see homeless people in China, either.  In both countries, they are taken care of by their families.  Our culture is different, with much weaker family ties, so in the US they don't have the support network from their family that they would have in some other countries.

That's a common misconception. I've traveled to Asia many many times (my wife is Vietnamese) and there are homeless everywhere, just as much as there are here. As I said, it's an issue that every major city has to grapple with, even around the world. You will have quite a large amount of people begging for money in China and Vietnam. We even saw it in Taiwan and Taiwan is very modern.

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On 8/26/2019 at 11:11 AM, Texasota said:

You know, I recognize that's snark, but it's actually a genuinely great idea. College campus already have all sorts of services for students that would be beneficial to the homeless.

easy access to drugs?

 

:lol:

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3 hours ago, MarathonMan said:

I apologize because we’re getting off topic here.  But I will add in just this one comment on what is an important side topic.  I have traveled to Japan — most recently in late ‘18 — and see a very different picture.  I have been all over that city and beyond.  All kinds of neighborhoods.  Rich, poor, touristy and local.  I don’t remember seeing ANY homeless people.  The sidewalks are clean.  Their streets are safe (so safe, in fact, that people park their bikes on the sidewalk and don’t lock them).  I’m guessing that Japan has its share of poor, mentally ill people.  What are they doing differently to help these people so that they don’t live in filth on the streets, turn to drugs and resort to petty theft for money?  Maybe the answer to the homeless problem at home has already been answered. Maybe we just need to study and adopt best-practices from others.  Just a thought.  

 

I spent 2 weeks in Japan back in '17.  The homeless people were super low key and off beaten paths.  The ones I saw had all their stuff with them and didn't setup till after last train.

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6 hours ago, MarathonMan said:

I apologize because we’re getting off topic here.  But I will add in just this one comment on what is an important side topic.  I have traveled to Japan — most recently in late ‘18 — and see a very different picture.  I have been all over that city and beyond.  All kinds of neighborhoods.  Rich, poor, touristy and local.  I don’t remember seeing ANY homeless people.  The sidewalks are clean.  Their streets are safe (so safe, in fact, that people park their bikes on the sidewalk and don’t lock them).  I’m guessing that Japan has its share of poor, mentally ill people.  What are they doing differently to help these people so that they don’t live in filth on the streets, turn to drugs and resort to petty theft for money?  Maybe the answer to the homeless problem at home has already been answered. Maybe we just need to study and adopt best-practices from others.  Just a thought.  

 

Interesting perspective, but its probably more of a fact that cities in Japan, and the japanese as a culture, really care for civility laws. European cities and American cities once followed in the same vain, but has gradually be whittled away by the current cultural trends. Civility laws are now seen, particular amoung the far left anarcho communist types as being oppressive and demeaning to those such as the homeless (which I believe their point of view to be very flawed). Then again they are paired with the other side of the horseshoe (if you believe that the far left and far right meet up at the end of the horseshoe spectrum, like I believe to be the case) are the far right which are overly orderly and it can be cumbersome to regular everyday people. Somewhere in the middle of those two extremes is where civility laws lie. In the 90's and 00's as a counter to extreme crime waves in the 70's and 80's many cities reembraced civility laws and cleaned up their cities and downtowns, but now it seems the pendulum is swinging back. All in all, its their adherence to civility laws that keep the homeless from being visible because they see that as a something that is valuable, not only for them, but for society at large. Here it seems its going to the opposite direction where the new virtue is let them live out in the open as if in some way to shame all of us that homeless exists and that we are the oppressors for keeping them away. All I would say is go walk around in Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and now Austin to see how successful their reversals of this have been....which is that it hasn't.

 

3 hours ago, Triton said:

That's a common misconception. I've traveled to Asia many many times (my wife is Vietnamese) and there are homeless everywhere, just as much as there are here. As I said, it's an issue that every major city has to grapple with, even around the world. You will have quite a large amount of people begging for money in China and Vietnam. We even saw it in Taiwan and Taiwan is very modern.

 

I agree. Each city has to tackle this, and they do so in their own way.

 

When I was Berlin, Germany, homeless were everywhere, but you didn't really see them, but that didn't mean they weren't around...its because of the cities "squatter culture". After the Berlin Wall fell most people in East Berlin quickly made an exodus to the West side virtually leaving everything they had in the east. Many buildings simply went vacant overnight. With the radical ups and downs that happen once capitalism is embraced...and if you don't have systems and values in place to hand capitalism properly...you are going to get a bunch of homeless poor people. Many of these people soon moved to East Berlin because now all the sudden there was vacant buildings everywhere. Berlin, still grappling with rising from the ashes of the wall crumbling had a real problem with housing on their hands, and so essentially instituted laws for "squatting". If you found an abandoned building and you stayed and didn't leave...then it was yours. There are still many "squatter apartments" in former East Berlin. Everyone from actual homeless people to the radical anarcho far leftist live in these places. Its actually rather interesting from an architect point of view. Its a dying breed though as now Berlin is getting more robust and is starting to put pressure on these settlements. They definitely won't last, but this example illustrates what one city did to handle this issue. Was it the right way to handle it in the long run? Not really. It just kicked the can down the curb, but it was a unique and pragmatic solution to a real problem. For cities here in the US governed by left leaning types, they truly believe, in a very naive way, that their solution to let homeless people camp is a "pragmatic" solution, but that is just keep kicking the can down the curb so they don't have to actually tackle the problem. At least squatter culture keep them away from view and off the street, but our current solutions are just barbaric and crazy. Not to mention its already bring about disease and filth. How is that compassionate. Hopefully people wake up to it all. Its a multi-variant problem that requires a complex solution from all angles. Like you stated about Asian cities though...at some point it has to be solved. You can't just keep kicking the can down the line and pat yourself on the back that you did something...when nothing happened at all.

Edited by Luminare
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Exclusive: New Houston accelerator reveals its inaugural cohort and announces strategic partner

Quote

The Ion Smart Cities Accelerator launched earlier this year with a goal of engaging startups from around the world to solve some of Houston's most prevalent challenges. Backed by Intel and Microsoft and partnered with the city of Houston and Station Houston, the program has developed a curriculum and selected its first cohort.

Ten startups from around the world — half of which from right here in Houston — were selected to be a part of the program. And narrowing down to 10 was tough for the program's judges, says Christine Galib, director of the Ion Smart Cities Accelerator.

 

  1. Aatonomy

  2. AeoShape

  3. BlocPower

  4. GoKid

  5. Kriterion

  6. Sensytec

  7. SlideX

  8. Umanity

  9. Wyzerr

  10. Reality IMT

 

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46 minutes ago, X.R. said:

So I guess those tarps are protecting the insides as they knock out the brick. Crazy.

FE3C15C9-D266-49BE-A134-9DD3AFEF14C9.jpeg

66566269-2680-4FC8-B991-F6F24C28E9FB.jpeg

 

Brick and concrete. Remember, this is all original cast concrete shell and not stone veneer or anything like that (really unique for the time it was built when you think about it). I would love to take a look at the original construction documents for this building. That would be a fun look.

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It seems that whole section, with the windows to the right in that photo, are coming out. They are currently using a jackhammer attached to a short crane to knock out that portion of the building.

 

I think that all of this will be those massive windows we saw in the rendering? If so, they weren't playing around with that render. You can also see people working on the wiring on the second floor through huge holes in the building, lol. It looks funny. 

 

Edited by X.R.
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The green fabric is really taking a beating, if you compare each of the photos.  Now one large section is completely gone:

 

hD7nWo9.jpg

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