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2 hours ago, Eastdwntwn said:

Does anyone know what else is supposed to go on this large lot? On Bell St. there are a bunch of small concrete driveways that look like townhome driveways. Is there a residential portion?

 

I didn't see anything but parking lot on the original plans. 

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20 hours ago, Eastdwntwn said:

Does anyone know what else is supposed to go on this large lot? On Bell St. there are a bunch of small concrete driveways that look like townhome driveways. Is there a residential portion?

 

If the driveways are on Hutchins that might be 2-3 townhomes. There's only a tiny sliver of the block that they don't control. Here's the plat for more info:

https://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=9103

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2 hours ago, phillip_white said:

 

If the driveways are on Hutchins that might be 2-3 townhomes. There's only a tiny sliver of the block that they don't control. Here's the plat for more info:

https://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=9103 691.1 kB · 15 downloads

Thanks for sending that over. But it isn't the area that they don't control. The driveways are along bell. They seem to be too close together to be entrances to a parking lot. I will snap a picture the next time I am over there. 

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19 hours ago, Sanjorade said:

 

Food truck parking maybe?

 

Too small for food trucks as they cannot block the sidewalk (also, why food trucks at a restaurant?). This appears to be a terribly implemented method of turning public street parking into private restaurant parking.

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5 hours ago, phillip_white said:

 

Too small for food trucks as they cannot block the sidewalk (also, why food trucks at a restaurant?). This appears to be a terribly implemented method of turning public street parking into private restaurant parking.

 

Was thinking food trucks mainly because of the area. Hutchins and St. E are turning into pedestrian friendly streets with more and more developments. 

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6 hours ago, Sanjorade said:

 

Was thinking food trucks mainly because of the area. Hutchins and St. E are turning into pedestrian friendly streets with more and more developments. 

 

That would be a cool idea if they tried it. I guess they could be the sole alcohol vendor and make up for lost food sales that way.

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On 10/17/2020 at 5:52 PM, hindesky said:

After taking a closer look at my first pic that wood looks like it has been charred.

Here are different levels of charred wood.

Y5OfwwF.jpg

 

it's a currently popular method of weather treatment. you have to do it to the level you see on the left most example.

 

rather than calling it 'charred' since the technique is borrowed from traditional Japanese methods they call it 'shoshugibon'.

 

the 2 examples on the right are options if you want to create more drama in the natural wood before completely sealing whatever furniture project you're doing.

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On 10/19/2020 at 10:52 AM, samagon said:

 

it's a currently popular method of weather treatment. you have to do it to the level you see on the left most example.

 

rather than calling it 'charred' since the technique is borrowed from traditional Japanese methods they call it 'shoshugibon'.

 

the 2 examples on the right are options if you want to create more drama in the natural wood before completely sealing whatever furniture project you're doing.

Shoshugibon is supposed to make the wood more resistant to insect and fungal attack. Consider that there are Japanese temple structures that have been so treated and have been around for more than a century.

 

I had to introduce shoshugibon to some architect interns who persistently referred to fire retardant-treated wood (chemically treated to resist burning) as "fire-treated wood." I explained to them that there is a such thing as fire-treated wood but it was not what they intended. Most all of them thought shoshugibon is a very cool and I agree.

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