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Can't make out the exact location but in the last rendering you can see the Greenway area in the distance.   http://miradorgroup.com/projects/giorgetti-houston      

View from above.  Went inside HRO today!    

Untitled by Houston Midtown, on Flickr   Untitled by Houston Midtown, on Flickr

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, rechlin said:

It looks like they finished the interiors before installing the windows. Isn't that risky, in case of a storm blowing rain in?

I was just coming to post the same comment. Not just the risk (enormous, IMHO), but the dust, moisture/humidity, and other external factors. There's a reason buildings are "dried-in" before the interior is started.

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I think this unit has an outdoor grille on its balcony. Nice but also risky(?) I would expect there is a fire suppression system too in case something gets out of hand. It would be integrated into the vent hood as in commercial kitchens.

 

The metal blade ceiling fan also hints this is an outdoor space but that is not a certainty. My outdoor ceiling fans have metal blades. The heat and humidity here would ruin anything else.

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I believe you are correct. Upon closer examination it does appear to be an outside room AKA patio. Although I've never seen a patio that was enclosed on three sides. Sorta defeats the purpose of a "patio".

 

That fan looks like a BAF Haiku. Superb fan, if that's what it really is.

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  • 4 weeks later...
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It's so each unit pays for their own electricity for air conditioning.  It's a lot less efficient than a central system, but it's the simplest way to make sure everyone pays for their own amount of cooling.

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23 hours ago, rechlin said:

It's so each unit pays for their own electricity for air conditioning.  It's a lot less efficient than a central system, but it's the simplest way to make sure everyone pays for their own amount of cooling.

I see, makes sense.

 

Having said that, I think there are ways to still have a chiller, and put heat pumps in each unit. Much more cost-effective than individual compressors, and the minimal cost of a chiller is spread over the units. But maybe there aren't enough units for this to make a difference.

 

Again, this comment is by someone who knows less than nothing about multi-family A/C. 🤐

 

If people are moving in, would love to hear from someone about how it turned out.

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I am more surprised that it is not an industrial unit that and the utilities aren't covered in their HOA. For a place that nice, with what I assume is a very high HOA, I would expect utilities to be included. I have seen this at condos that were much much much cheaper than these units.

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18 hours ago, thatguysly said:

I am more surprised that it is not an industrial unit that and the utilities aren't covered in their HOA. For a place that nice, with what I assume is a very high HOA, I would expect utilities to be included. I have seen this at condos that were much much much cheaper than these units.

 

Condos with utilities included in the HOA are almost all (to my knowledge, ALL) older buildings.  I don't think anyone builds new condos with the intention of having utilities included in the HOA fees.  (I may be imagining this, but I thought I remembered once seeing that doing so is not allowed by the building code.)

 

EDIT:  I found it.  The Texas Utilities Code requires each unit in apartment and condo buildings (new construction and conversions) to be individually metered (electric meters). 

 

Sec. 184.012. NEW CONSTRUCTION OR CONVERSION. (a) A political subdivision may not authorize the construction or occupancy of a new apartment house, including the conversion of property to a condominium, unless the construction plan provides for the measurement of the quantity of electricity consumed by the occupants of each dwelling unit of the apartment house, either by individual metering by the utility company or by submetering by the owner.

Edited by Houston19514
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45 minutes ago, Houston19514 said:

 

Condos with utilities included in the HOA are almost all (to my knowledge, ALL) older buildings.  I don't think anyone builds new condos with the intention of having utilities included in the HOA fees.  (I may be imagining this, but I thought I remembered once seeing that doing so is not allowed by the building code.)

 

EDIT:  I found it.  The Texas Utilities Code requires each unit in apartment and condo buildings (new construction and conversions) to be individually metered (electric meters). 

 

Sec. 184.012. NEW CONSTRUCTION OR CONVERSION. (a) A political subdivision may not authorize the construction or occupancy of a new apartment house, including the conversion of property to a condominium, unless the construction plan provides for the measurement of the quantity of electricity consumed by the occupants of each dwelling unit of the apartment house, either by individual metering by the utility company or by submetering by the owner.

 

Thank you for sharing this. I was wondering why I saw it at some places and not others. 

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It's typical for new construction to have individually metered electric but common gas and hot water. Even in buildings with chillers, the fan's to distribute the air to a unit are metered in each unit. Older buildings with all utilities included such as the Willowick nearby the Giorgetti have HOAs nearing $1.00 per square foot.

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On 4/21/2020 at 10:06 AM, astrohip said:

I see, makes sense.

 

Having said that, I think there are ways to still have a chiller, and put heat pumps in each unit. Much more cost-effective than individual compressors, and the minimal cost of a chiller is spread over the units. But maybe there aren't enough units for this to make a difference.

 

Again, this comment is by someone who knows less than nothing about multi-family A/C. 🤐

 

If people are moving in, would love to hear from someone about how it turned out.


If the building had a chiller system they would have to have a staff to operate and maintain such system. I am a stationary engineer and this is what I do. Some buildings meter their chilled water and this is ideal for billing for cooling and paying for a plant and operators, chiller mechanics etc. also handy for identifying leaks that can affect the entire system.

 

Heat pumps are just reversible split systems where you can swap the refrigerant flow and make the inside coil the condenser (hot) and the outdoor coil the evaporator (cold). Each unit would still have its own compressor and electrical expenses. This is an ideal system for Houston, however when the outdoor temp goes lower than 40 or so a supplement Boiler has to be added. In cases like 2727 Kirby and the River Oaks, both coils are inside and a water condenser system is used with a cooling tower outside to make it work building wide without a hundred plus outdoor coils.

 

Personally I think residents will start demanding a chilled water central system after they start racking up repair costs for heat pumps but we will see what happens many years from now.


I’m more surprised one plant was not built for the Hanover building and they didn’t just sell chilled water to the Giorgetti. Not sure what system they use but if I had to guess it would be a heat pump with a cooling tower as well. 🤔 

 

 

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18 hours ago, Geoff8201 said:


If the building had a chiller system they would have to have a staff to operate and maintain such system. I am a stationary engineer and this is what I do. Some buildings meter their chilled water and this is ideal for billing for cooling and paying for a plant and operators, chiller mechanics etc. also handy for identifying leaks that can affect the entire system.

 

Heat pumps are just reversible split systems where you can swap the refrigerant flow and make the inside coil the condenser (hot) and the outdoor coil the evaporator (cold). Each unit would still have its own compressor and electrical expenses. This is an ideal system for Houston, however when the outdoor temp goes lower than 40 or so a supplement Boiler has to be added. In cases like 2727 Kirby and the River Oaks, both coils are inside and a water condenser system is used with a cooling tower outside to make it work building wide without a hundred plus outdoor coils.

 

Personally I think residents will start demanding a chilled water central system after they start racking up repair costs for heat pumps but we will see what happens many years from now.


I’m more surprised one plant was not built for the Hanover building and they didn’t just sell chilled water to the Giorgetti. Not sure what system they use but if I had to guess it would be a heat pump with a cooling tower as well. 🤔 

 

 

Thanks, great info! Learned something new today.

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Giorgetti Houston: 7-Story Residential Building
  • 1 month later...

c881eb0bfeb68f1b04bb91043ad7e7d8.gif

 

^^^ i for one, simply cannot believe that here in the year 2020, we still have these ULTRA ANTIQUATED, very low hanging, and seriously hazardous power lines hanging directly in close proximity to such beautiful and state-of-the-art condominium development.  IS THIS FOR REAL?  this is so very dangerous!  and why is it hanging so low....?

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6 hours ago, monarch said:

c881eb0bfeb68f1b04bb91043ad7e7d8.gif

 

^^^ i for one, simply cannot believe that here in the year 2020, we still have these ULTRA ANTIQUATED, very low hanging, and seriously hazardous power lines hanging directly in close proximity to such beautiful and state-of-the-art condominium development.  IS THIS FOR REAL?  this is so very dangerous!  and why is it hanging so low....?

Those lines don't serve the condominium, and no one is willing to pay the cost for CenterPoint to bury all of the lines.

 

The lines aren't hanging low, that's the camera screwing up things again.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 months later...

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/life/home/design/article/First-look-Houston-s-Giorgetti-building-makes-15628205.php

 

Update from the Chronicle!  Apparently the building is open and the interior pictures look amazing.  Drove by today and the Giorgetti could really use an HEB mid/highrise across the street.  The empty lot really takes away from the gorgeous building.

 

"Its subtle, black brick exterior -- the pattern spells out "G-i-o-r-g-e-t-t-i" in binary code -- mimics the black basalt pavers often used in streets throughout Italy, and slabs of brilliant marble speak of the quarries the country is known for."

 

^also learned this today.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow, I find that interior... deeply uncomfortable looking. That's mostly the staging, but the stain on the (let's say real wood) cabinets is deeply awful. 

 

On the other hand, I *love* the continuation of the floor onto the wall and ceiling in the first photo, but I assume that's a public space? It's genuinely hard to tell, because the staging of that room and the living room further down is equally unnatural and unwelcoming looking. 

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