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Giorgetti Houston: 7-story Residential Building

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On 3/1/2019 at 7:37 PM, ekdrm2d1 said:

Giorgetti's, or HRO's, staging area is now fenced off.  That, combined with the sales office move makes me think something is up.

 

fQsEmQ0.jpg

 

Is the staging area the site of this proposal?

 

 

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Those townhouses look way cooler than your typical town house

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This architect and designer seem to have been on their toes when it comes to details.

I like the openings and the extra depth in the facade.

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16 hours ago, gclass said:

^^^ once this ultra luxurious project is completed, it shall probably reign as HOUSTON'S most ^^^ "POSH" edifice.  even the most minute details here are... simply incredible!

 

 

I'm going to reserve judgment until it's complete.

 

What are the approx selling prices per square foot?

 

One thing that kinda bugs me is the neighbors. I'm not sure I want to spend millions and have 1970s era townhouses breathing down my neck. Having said that, I haven't driven by in a few weeks, I need to take a fresh look and see how it's all coming together, including the neighborhood ambiance.

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That neighborhood has great vibes. Think how those 70's townhouse owners feel about five to six years of constant construction.

They're just minding their own business in a beautiful tree lined neighborhood, and the other thing is you need to walk the neighborhood.

not drive by. if you really want to get a feel for it. Those townhouses don't effect the way people will live in the Georgetti.

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I actually really dig those townhomes, it'd be great if Giorgetti offered to power wash them. One can dream I guess

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 Those townhouses were designed by a very respected architecture professor who I studied with at U of Houston named Burdette Keeland.

He also worked in the city planning department  for  years. He was a modernist and a very popular architect. I like them also.

He was a very good teacher. 

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Article is from last year...I’d hardly characterize sales as brisk. Building has some interesting design elements but I’m not sure Houston is best market for it.

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My point was simply the building is not selling--the market has been the naysayer; I was just the messenger. I think they've sold about 3-4 units in the past 14 months. It was supposed to open winter 2019 -- sign still says that. My guess is they are slowing construction down because of lack of sales. 

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7 hours ago, db650 said:

My point was simply the building is not selling--the market has been the naysayer; I was just the messenger. I think they've sold about 3-4 units in the past 14 months. It was supposed to open winter 2019 -- sign still says that. My guess is they are slowing construction down because of lack of sales. 

 

I doubt any developers would extend the construction time on purpose, especially when they can’t realize the revenue from the ones they did sell... 

 

im glad we are getting this building. I think it’s one of the more interesting projects we have going.

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20 hours ago, gclass said:

 

^^^ there were those that often stated the EXACT SAME SENTIMENT regarding the ^^^ above hotel masterpiece as your particular "quote".  however, this particular HOUSTON property is now garnering 5***** very prestigious stars in basically every hospitality category.  trust me, if you DENOUNCE THE NAYSAYERS and actually take the initiative to build/construct within our fair CITY OF HOUSTON... you will very often end up a WINNER! 

 

It appears you're handling the marketing for this project. At least here on HAIF. 🙄

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11 hours ago, Avossos said:

 

I doubt any developers would extend the construction time on purpose, especially when they can’t realize the revenue from the ones they did sell... 

 

im glad we are getting this building. I think it’s one of the more interesting projects we have going.

If the construction loan is due when the building is finished and they haven't sold enough to pay off the loan, they could slow down the construction.

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5 hours ago, db650 said:

If the construction loan is due when the building is finished and they haven't sold enough to pay off the loan, they could slow down the construction.

 

Its not like this is unheard of, but that would be a dumb move by the GC. Everyday spent on one job is another day not spent on another job. Besides, normally if a job slows down its because of either lead time on materials, or a GC dumber than a bag of hammers. Not exactly from malevolence. 

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On 6/23/2019 at 1:09 PM, bobruss said:

 Those townhouses were designed by a very respected architecture professor who I studied with at U of Houston named Burdette Keeland.

He also worked in the city planning department  for  years. He was a modernist and a very popular architect. I like them also.

He was a very good teacher. 

There is a design laboratory named after him on campus now.  It opened shortly before I finished up there.  Was the old band annex (or warehouse) adjacent to the CoArch now it is a modeling workshop.  

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1 hour ago, arche_757 said:

There is a design laboratory named after him on campus now.  It opened shortly before I finished up there.  Was the old band annex (or warehouse) adjacent to the CoArch now it is a modeling workshop.  

I attended back in the late 60's early 70's and we had classes in an old one story dilapidated building with a two story annex that classes were held in also.This was just across a lawn behind the old cougar den before they added the underground section. The one story building housed most of the undergraduate studios library and some class rooms, and the other two story building had the offices and some fourth and fifth year classes. This was a tumultuous time at the architecture school. My freshman year was sort of the day of awakening with part of the southcoaast crew graduating that spring and anarchy running rampant in the school. Everyone wore adios Dean George buttons and there was a war going on in the  school to get rid of him. He was hung in effigy, the  smell of marijuana wafting through the area all of the time. Inflatables were just starting to be made by southcoaast members, and Andy Anderson would have his structures classes building some kind of odd structural elements. We built Towers of Babel out of 4' x 8' cardboard sheets that had to be 8 feet tall, that had to hold our whole team on top. I remember the first free festival that was held outside the building where they had added a silo  to the side of the old building for crits. Bands would play and food was cooked on open fires.They had strung large rope structures between the pines that were just outside the silo, with people climbing all over them. I was in a whole new world and it was amazing.  The dean was finally ousted and everything finally settled down. It was a completely crazy scene with all night project parties before crits and loud music playing all of the time.

The Vietnam war was just really getting started so there was already an air of defiance and anger in the air. Crazy times the sixties.

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Sounds much more memorable than my years at the CoArch.  The only similarities were the wars (sadly enough).  Vietnam for you, and the Iraq war following September 11th for me.  Suffice to say the general mood at the college was one of quiet unease /borderline marginal discomfort.  Nothing close to the atmosphere you recalled from the years you spent there.  People were either skeptical or quietly “ok” with what was happening in the Persian Gulf.  Of course there was no draft... so, yeah.

 

And Joe Mashburn had pretty much turned around the CoArch.  UH had (at the time) one of the highest rated accredited architectural schools in the country, largely due to him and his staff.  I remember some profs who were there to review and approve the accreditation (as it was up for renewal) commented that “what UH was doing was something they wanted to emulate back at their own campus”.

 

I can’t recall but I think the schools who sent staff to review our accreditation were: University of Miami, Cornell and some other university.  Two of those are well regarded for various reasons.  So it was a worthy compliment.

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I like your three quotes by Wright, Lincoln and Twain. So timely and true.

Especially Lincoln's.So cogent.

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Was hoping to see some of the white brick, dark brick is slowly going up.

vJ0NuAX.jpg

 

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I love the size and shape of this building. Fits very nicely in Upper Kirby with West Ave. 

 

Almost a shame the scaffolding is going away. Some fins would be extremely sexy. 

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