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The Victoria: 8-Story Residential Building


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I believe this is already built.  Thought it was going to be Fisher's office.

 

That is on the opposite side of the street.  The attached plat is for the west side of the street.  Looks to be where the auto repair shop is currently located. 

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Joy.  So basically they built their sales office across the street.  Good luck walking across Yale to the job site.  At least with all these residentail townhomes, apartments and condos being built along Yale maybe the city will start making everyone go the speed limiit.  I have had two cars totaled on that street (not my fault..).  I drive Heights now!

 

I am interested in what will happen at NE corner of Yale and 17th. 

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Son of a biscuit! That's my great uncle's house! My family sold it shortly after he passed away in December 2001. To see that picture made my heart drop to my stomach. I can't believe they've let that happen. I can still close my eyes and see the beautiful flower beds he had all around the front yard, and of course, the leaning tin garage in the back.

I'm thankful that I am the only one in my family still alive to see what's become of 121 Payne. I'll hunt down some photo album pictures and post what the house USED to look like, in all its red and white glory.

Edited by Purpledevil
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Thanks, I remember what it looked like once it was freshly restored after my uncle's passing. They had done a lot of work to the house, even moving the staircase entrance from the corner of the kitchen to the living room up front. That was my favorite part of that house, the room upstairs with the old crank open windows. That would be those three windows up front on the roof.

I don't know if they kept the second kitchen behind the second bedroom on the left of the house. Only house I've ever been in that had two full kitchens in it. Of course, that's because the house was originally a duplex. I saw the inspection pictures from a couple of months ago. Absolutely sickening.

Here's a story about 121 Payne that NO ONE else can tell. When my great uncle passed away, we began emptying the house in preparation of my Aunt Lena moving to Lufkin. When we pulled the pictures off of the walls, 50+ years of tar had dripped down the walls behind them. It was that very day and that very sight when I decided I would never light another cigarette again.

I certainly hope you are right, barracuda. The house is just over a century old now, having been built in 1910. Even in its current state, I'd hate to see it lost, but they were sending letters to my uncle about 45 taking out his house for ROW several years before he died, so at some point it will be inevitabile.

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Just an update on 121 Payne. I went to see it Friday night. There is a 2 story addition on the back now, with apparently a 2 car garage built beneath. Also saw that there is a brand new roof on it, new solid glasses where the old cranking windows were, and it appeared that they (or have recently) leveled the support blocks beneath it, and poured new ones as well. It didn't look nearly as bad as the pictures online, up close and personal.

Certainly noted that Germantown sure seemed to be much more quiet and serene at night than it used to be just 15 years ago. We were there for a good 20 minutes, and everything surrounding was extremely quiet and peaceful for a Friday night. Glad to have seen the house will not be lost, it sure didn't look promising before.

As for Yale, I noticed that Yale Stone has been demoed, apparently this last week. All that sits on that side of the block is Jus' Mac and the abandoned Sunset Heights Food Market (or as we used to call it when it sat on the corner of 26th and Arlington, "the green store"). Looks like this project is moving rather quickly, they were just selling stone materials out of there a few weeks ago!

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  • 1 year later...

The rendering looks ok, but I still don't understand why almost all construction here in Houston only builds 3 foot sidewalks. Why do developers not make  6ft sidewalks (Or better yet, all the way to the street) to increase mobility? Does it have to do with city regulations or what?

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38 minutes ago, dml423 said:

The rendering looks ok, but I still don't understand why almost all construction here in Houston only builds 3 foot sidewalks. Why do developers not make  6ft sidewalks (Or better yet, all the way to the street) to increase mobility? Does it have to do with city regulations or what?

 

The city's sidewalk ordinance mandates 5' minimum (6' for transit corridors). Sidewalks cost money; developers usually won't build more than what's expected of them.

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1 hour ago, lithiumaneurysm said:

 

The city's sidewalk ordinance mandates 5' minimum (6' for transit corridors). Sidewalks cost money; developers usually won't build more than what's expected of them.

 

Thanks for the link. I understand it costs money to build the sidewalk, but wouldn't the continuous upkeep of mowing the grass eventually erode the savings?

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7 hours ago, dml423 said:

 

Thanks for the link. I understand it costs money to build the sidewalk, but wouldn't the continuous upkeep of mowing the grass eventually erode the savings?

 

I assume most of these developments have to hire landscaping services anyway. Getting them to cut a few extra square feet of grass every couple of weeks probably doesn't amplify the cost much. Maintaining extra sidewalk space, especially in a city where concrete settles so poorly, would probably be pricier.

 

Anyway, I wish the city would do more to promote wider sidewalks. Our politicians pay plenty of lip-service to the concept of walkability, but there's little talk of changing the ordinances which make it so difficult to achieve (parking minimums, building setbacks, etc). Of course, changing these laws would be far more controversial and politically costly than the subpar status quo.

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On 6/2/2016 at 1:18 PM, H-Town Man said:

Very Memorial Drive. Good example of what happens to neighborhood character without zoning.

 

 

In this case, it's an example of what happens to a corrugated metal warehouse and a lawnmower retailer when the dirt underneath them appreciates so much that the resulting property tax and opportunity cost makes their continued existence untenable.

 

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On ‎6‎/‎3‎/‎2016 at 1:57 PM, Angostura said:

 

In this case, it's an example of what happens to a corrugated metal warehouse and a lawnmower retailer when the dirt underneath them appreciates so much that the resulting property tax and opportunity cost makes their continued existence untenable.

 

 

I'm in real estate. You're not going to wow me with big words.

 

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On June 2, 2016 at 5:19 PM, dml423 said:

 

Thanks for the link. I understand it costs money to build the sidewalk, but wouldn't the continuous upkeep of mowing the grass eventually erode the savings?

Developers build, HOAs (i.e., the residents) pay to maintain.

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  • 1 month later...

It appears a condo building is being constructed on the 800 block of Yale. I'm shocked this project was able to get permitted because of Houston impervious area restrictions for new developments. I believe it's projects like these that exacerbate our flooding problems. 

 

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5 minutes ago, DMR said:

It appears a condo building is being constructed on the 800 block of Yale. I'm shocked this project was able to get permitted because of Houston impervious area restrictions for new developments. I believe it's projects like these that exacerbate our flooding problems. 

 

How would this project exacerbate the flood problem exactly? Do we need to start building vertical retention ponds? In your answer, please relate it to the consequences of building a neighborhood out in the suburbs on prairie land. Thanks.

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4 hours ago, DMR said:

I am surprised this project complied with C.O.H. impervious area requirements. It's projects like these that adversely effect our flooding problems. 

 

No, it's boundless greenfield suburban development that exacerbates our flooding problems. The relentless expansion of the White Oak Bayou floodplain into the Heights isn't because of development in the Heights – it's because of what's happening all the way past Beltway 8.

 

Blaming a single high-density building for exacerbating flooding is like claiming the Ashby high-rise creates traffic – the effect is negligible, and ironically, the development in question is part of the solution, not the problem.

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It is comical to me when multifamily or condo developments are called out as being the cause of a particular problem when the truth is development in the entire region causes the issue. So, yeah, I'd have to agree with lithium about the NIMBY plays used with traffic and flooding--I'd add schools to that list. The Tower of Traffic will add cars to Bissonnet, but the tens of thousands of added housing units and millions of square feet of medical/office/retail space within a five mile radius is the root of the traffic problems for the two lane road that is basically a transportation funnel between Southwest Freeway and Rice University. Is the density a problem though? If we didn't add people in the city, we'd just be developing more hinterland and causing even worse flooding and a greater need for new roads.

 

Each watershed is different. The truth is the White Oak watershed is nearly 100% built out save for a few larger tracts of land inside Beltway 8. Even the suburban areas outside the Beltway are developed. Yeah, more land should have been saved in the 100- and 500- year flood plain. Unfortunately, time machines and common sense wands haven't been invented yet. The White Oak watershed will need changes at both the lot level and infrastructure rehab level to make a difference. Blaming this particular lot for exacerbating flooding doesn't make sense since it was mostly impervious to begin with, but lot-based regulations can make a difference long-term--the problem is it will take too long on its own in an already built out watershed. The city does require storm water detention in various ways. I do not know city code backwards and forward, but I do know that many new infill developments require storm water detention under driveways if it can't be provided in a basin. Just because you can't see a hole in the ground, doesn't mean water isn't being detained during heavy rains by storm pipes. One could easily argue that new development with storm water detention above or below ground will actually hold back more water in a subtropical downpour than a half-paved lot with a clay soil parking lot that has been compacted for the last 70 years.

 

Flood control in other watersheds that still have undeveloped land should be approached slightly differently. The Addicks Reservoir, Cypress Creek, and Spring Creek watersheds have land that can still be developed smarter or not developed at all. 

 

It's obvious we don't have enough historical climate data to know just how intense rainstorms here can be. Actually, maybe we do know that sometimes feet of rain can fall in a matter of hours over very isolated locations, but we just choose not to believe it will happen again until Meyerland floods twice in a year. Instead of pointing fingers it would be more beneficial to get creative and figure out how to solve our problems.

 

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On 7/14/2016 at 3:10 PM, DMR said:

I am surprised this project complied with C.O.H. impervious area requirements. It's projects like these that adversely effect our flooding problems. 

Did you post basically the samething that you posted on the first page that I responded to?

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  • 1 month later...
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  • 1 year later...

What is going on with this thing?  There is a big pile of trash in front of the building next to a crane/lift with the front window punched out.  It seemed like for weeks nothing was happening, but I have recently seen a handful of workers go up into the parking garage in the building.  

Edited by s3mh
mistake
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  • 4 weeks later...
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Per comments on from crosscreek and HAG Swamplot: 

 

Quote

Swamplot, here’s a better story for you on Yale:

The Fisher Homes tower on Yale is now fenced off and all construction has stopped. Fisher Homes of Texas website is down, Yelp shows their offices closed permanently across the street. Please tell us what you know or have heard, thanks in advance.

 

Quote

They also pulled all listings for 829 Yale off the market. The project was always an eyesore and created a mess along Yale. Then again anything ever touched by Fisher has been a disaster.


http://swamplot.com/meet-heights-village-the-new-strip-center-going-up-at-yale-and-5th-st/2018-02-15/#comments

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  • 2 weeks later...

Cause No. 2016-64847, KAVAC Holding Company, LLC v. Paull Partners, LLC et al.  Look it up on the Harris County District Clerk's website.  Summary: cross collateralized loans, cash crunch, foreclosure, injunction, bankruptcy removal and remand, and enough defendants to field a football team.  One. Hot. Mess.

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So, Fisher and his web of LLCs and other legal entities became either illiquid or insolvent. His lenders attempted to foreclose (August 2016). Fisher sued, alleging bad faith in the structure of the loans (September 2016), and asked the court to restrain the foreclosure sale (which it did). 

 

Much legal wrangling ensued. 

 

A number of Fisher's entities declared bankruptcy (Jan 2018), at which point the case was removed to federal court. 

 

I would expect the site to remain in its current condition until the bankruptcy gets resolved and the property is sold to another buyer.

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On 3/2/2018 at 2:23 PM, Angostura said:

So, Fisher and his web of LLCs and other legal entities became either illiquid or insolvent. His lenders attempted to foreclose (August 2016). Fisher sued, alleging bad faith in the structure of the loans (September 2016), and asked the court to restrain the foreclosure sale (which it did). 

 

 

Having a different LLCs for each real estate development is standard and very sound practice.  If one project fails, it does not affect the others.  Fisher cross collateralized his projects.  That effectively negates the liability protection of the different LLCs.  

 

 

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  • 11 months later...

Any updates on this one. Drove by this a couple weeks ago and its still in the same condition as it was in the previous image posted Dec. 2017. I would think that all the bs / dust had settle with the previous company and this could either move forward with demolition as this could effectively be labeled as blight, or another company had gotten hold of the property and might work to finish it or extensively remodel. However, with the site looking like the same it has been, I'm guessing nothing has changed?

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  • 1 year later...

Anything new on this project?? What a freakin' disaster. I used to live directly behind this location on Allston; but sold years before this madness happened. Me and my neighbor knew it was inevitable after all the development down by 6th and 5th happened around 2010. I suppose this is a catch-22 situ now; to huge to be affordable to demo and build, been sitting too long to finish it due to uncertainty of structural integrity. Anyone in the know? Thanks! Nealio

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6 hours ago, NealioSpace said:

Anything new on this project?? What a freakin' disaster. I used to live directly behind this location on Allston; but sold years before this madness happened. Me and my neighbor knew it was inevitable after all the development down by 6th and 5th happened around 2010. I suppose this is a catch-22 situ now; to huge to be affordable to demo and build, been sitting too long to finish it due to uncertainty of structural integrity. Anyone in the know? Thanks! Nealio

 

 

Drove by the other day and its presence is quite jarring. It looks terrible now.  

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  • The title was changed to The Victoria: 8-Story Residential Building

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