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Midtown Streetscape Improvements


Purdueenginerd

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@hindeskyfor that drainage, are they trying to get water to flow into the system faster?

I ask because as an additional reason for this taking so long, on top of the reasons listed in this thread, is potentially that they wanted to make as direct a connection to the large underground drainage pipes in the area. Did this area flood? The reason I bring it up is that when they corrected the big street dip on la branch in the museum area I was talking to the city contractors, and they said part of the reason some of the recent projects take a bit longer is because midway through the approval process for the la branch upgrade/fix, so about a year ago, the city looked at where water was flowing in each area around DT and decided to make as direct a connection as possible to the larger underground pipes. Thats why for the three recently redone corners in the museum district have grates/drains that look like the picture above. 

Just food for thought. I rode my bike through the area on Sunday, and man Midtown is going to have some significantly verdant areas after this is done.

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35 minutes ago, X.R. said:

@hindeskyfor that drainage, are they trying to get water to flow into the system faster?

I ask because as an additional reason for this taking so long, on top of the reasons listed in this thread, is potentially that they wanted to make as direct a connection to the large underground drainage pipes in the area. Did this area flood? The reason I bring it up is that when they corrected the big street dip on la branch in the museum area I was talking to the city contractors, and they said part of the reason some of the recent projects take a bit longer is because midway through the approval process for the la branch upgrade/fix, so about a year ago, the city looked at where water was flowing in each area around DT and decided to make as direct a connection as possible to the larger underground pipes. Thats why for the three recently redone corners in the museum district have grates/drains that look like the picture above. 

Just food for thought. I rode my bike through the area on Sunday, and man Midtown is going to have some significantly verdant areas after this is done.

That part of Midtown flooded during Allison in 2001, but I think that was due to the overall huge amount of water that fell. Once the freeway filled up, there was no other place for the water to go except into the townhouses.

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47 minutes ago, X.R. said:

@hindeskyfor that drainage, are they trying to get water to flow into the system faster?

I ask because as an additional reason for this taking so long, on top of the reasons listed in this thread, is potentially that they wanted to make as direct a connection to the large underground drainage pipes in the area. Did this area flood? The reason I bring it up is that when they corrected the big street dip on la branch in the museum area I was talking to the city contractors, and they said part of the reason some of the recent projects take a bit longer is because midway through the approval process for the la branch upgrade/fix, so about a year ago, the city looked at where water was flowing in each area around DT and decided to make as direct a connection as possible to the larger underground pipes. Thats why for the three recently redone corners in the museum district have grates/drains that look like the picture above. 

Just food for thought. I rode my bike through the area on Sunday, and man Midtown is going to have some significantly verdant areas after this is done.

They're raingardens. According to macmillandictionary.com 

"A raingarden is a garden area deliberately planted in order to deal with the water which runs off roofs, driveways and other hard surfaces in periods of heavy rain. ... They often contain flower or vegetable beds with underlying sandy soil which helps water filter away."
In other words, they help filter road oils and other forms of pollution from storm water before it's drained into the bayous.
Plantings will include cypress trees and native irises.
 

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