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Australian Developer Planning Five High-Rises for Midtown

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Man, with the two camden apartments and this apartment underconstruction, thats about 1200-1300 units in a 3 block space. Add two more buildings there could be around 2000 people living in those 3 blocks.

 

Thats a lot of people for retail spaces. 

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I think the second shot was taken from the Houston Community College office building, and right behind it, is the  3300 Main mixed use high rise project going up..

Density is definitely going up.

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Fix the damn 'like' button already! I want to give that great photo with the yellow sky a 'like' so whoever took it knows that I appreciate the effort they went to in taking it and posting it!

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4 hours ago, Reporter said:

Fix the damn 'like' button already! I want to give that great photo with the yellow sky a 'like' so whoever took it knows that I appreciate the effort they went to in taking it and posting it!

 

For real, I'm waiting to post the rendering of the block 42 tower until I am able to be congratulated by my peers.  I NEED that gratification.

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3 minutes ago, brijonmang said:

 

For real, I'm waiting to post the rendering of the block 42 tower until I am able to be congratulated by my peers.  I NEED that gratification.

 

I think you just like reminding everyone that you are in possession of the block 42 rendering, lol.

 

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20 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

I think you just like reminding everyone that you are in possession of the block 42 rendering, lol.

 

 

Haha shhhhh

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And long as your at it, bring back the old 'thumbs down' option because I want to be able to piss people off with greater ease too! And don't forget about running a diagnostic on the entire emoji system! What is this...the stone age or something!!!  

 

The following profanity and emoji inventory is just a test to see if anyone is monitoring this website. It is not in anyway directed at anyone in particular:

-------

thousand dollars :ph34r::rolleyes::P:):angry2:

------

Thank you.

 

 

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This developer is an Aussie.  If he is reading this, please note:  I am offering to buy you the beer of your choice at the spot of your choice the next time you are in town.

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2 hours ago, UtterlyUrban said:

This developer is an Aussie.  If he is reading this, please note:  I am offering to buy you the beer of your choice at the spot of your choice the next time you are in town.

 

Sounds like fun!

 

Thought I read a Aussie brewery will be apart of the three tower development.  Sure it's around this thread someplace.

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After Harvey, high rise living is becoming a necessity in this city.  Over the next 10 years, I suspect the inner loop will explode with them. 

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On 8/1/2018 at 9:31 PM, ekdrm2d1 said:

 

Thought I read a Aussie brewery will be apart of the three tower development.  Sure it's around this thread someplace.

 

There was a Little Creatures logo on one of the early renderings, but I think it was just a placeholder.

 

 

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This project along with 3300 Main are going to make a huge impact on the overall skyline and really begin to pull the TMC and downtown together. 

You can really get a sense for what this will do when you take the 288 into town and exit Victoria to 59 or 69, whatever it is. This will be similar to whats going on in the Museum district with its new cluster of residential high rise additions to the existing towers surrounding the northern end of Hermann Park.

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are they going to demolish Greensheet builiding and Leon's Lounge... I certainly hope not.

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2 hours ago, Avossos said:

are they going to demolish Greensheet builiding and Leon's Lounge... I certainly hope not.

Greensheet has a different owner.  Caydon owns the portion of the block to the south of it.  The renderings of the towers that leaked awhile back featured Leon's, the Greensheet building, as well as the Vietnamese restaurant.

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I like how they're got apartments on two sides covering the parking garage, I think the sort of thing makes the parking podiums looks so much better

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It would be beneficial for the future of the neighborhood if they could repurpose as many of the early 30's-60's era buildings still standing, especially ones with good bones, within reason. I'm not suggesting that  anyone has to do this, but if they want a successful area it needs to feel good. Those efforts  would provide space for retail, and other conveniences while enhancing the public realm. The idea is to hopefully create an environment that people enjoy living, working and playing in. Diversity of architecture mixing old and new are all important ingredients, and hopefully most developers understand the important role they play. Of course  smart landscaping, lighting, signage and safe sidewalks are all important pieces to the puzzle. As an example...

A recent Friday night in a great little neighborhood.

  Stepped off the train, at a very busy  Ensemble Station and headed across the street, to Match, the new Lake Flato, arts venue, to catch an early lecture. Besides the lecture there was also a performance in one of the theaters. Afterwards, we detoured west to Holmans on Milam, for a quick cocktail on their patio, then headed back over to Main Street, where we turned south for a little food and fun. We worked our way down the next four blocks of retail and entertainment, while trying to decide what kind of food to try with  so many new options and  old reliables. Mid Main, and its row of expanding retail spaces, is the brand new mixed use apartment complex which spans a block and a half and is right in the heart of Ensemble Station.  We stop for a beer at Natchatee, a little hamburger joint with music, and an interesting art collection including a great Art Guys piece. It's a little repurposed bungalow, that  sits just south of Mid Main and it's the first of the  bohemian section which has developed over the years around the Continental club.  Just across Main street lies the Ensemble Theater, a mainstay and the only thing in the area for ever. After sticking our heads in some of the eclectic shops, we hurry past The Continental Club and Tacos A Go Go and back across Main Street, just south of Alabama, for an art exhibition at Inman gallery, one of several galleries with exhibitions that night, which are housed  in the ground floor of Isabella Court, probably one of the coolest early Houston apartment buildings, with a most remarkable courtyard. We meet up with our friend, and he gives us a quick tour of his new apartment. Afterwards we all head back to catch the late show at Continental Club. This bohemian,  neighborhood spans possibly four or five blocks on both sides of Main and  Milam and packs a wallop and the great thing was,we never had to get in our car.  We ended up for some late night spring rolls at Mai's.  Had a nightcap across from Continental club

After finishing off  a couple Ice coffees, we  connect with our Uber driver and head home. We had  so much fun, with so much to see and do all in one little neighborhood in Midtown. 

What a great night.

 

Now that's what a great neighborhood can offer.

But you can't tear down all of the old just to put up a lot of cold slick steel and glass, mixed use development and get the same funky feel you get in the heart of Midtown.  Its the fabric that makes the difference.

 

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8 hours ago, bobruss said:

It would be beneficial for the future of the neighborhood if they could repurpose as many of the early 30's-60's era buildings still standing, especially ones with good bones, within reason. I'm not suggesting that  anyone has to do this, but if they want a successful area it needs to feel good. Those efforts  would provide space for retail, and other conveniences while enhancing the public realm. The idea is to hopefully create an environment that people enjoy living, working and playing in. Diversity of architecture mixing old and new are all important ingredients, and hopefully most developers understand the important role they play. Of course  smart landscaping, lighting, signage and safe sidewalks are all important pieces to the puzzle. As an example...

A recent Friday night in a great little neighborhood.

  Stepped off the train, at a very busy  Ensemble Station and headed across the street, to Match, the new Lake Flato, arts venue, to catch an early lecture. Besides the lecture there was also a performance in one of the theaters. Afterwards, we detoured west to Holmans on Milam, for a quick cocktail on their patio, then headed back over to Main Street, where we turned south for a little food and fun. We worked our way down the next four blocks of retail and entertainment, while trying to decide what kind of food to try with  so many new options and  old reliables. Mid Main, and its row of expanding retail spaces, is the brand new mixed use apartment complex which spans a block and a half and is right in the heart of Ensemble Station.  We stop for a beer at Natchatee, a little hamburger joint with music, and an interesting art collection including a great Art Guys piece. It's a little repurposed bungalow, that  sits just south of Mid Main and it's the first of the  bohemian section which has developed over the years around the Continental club.  Just across Main street lies the Ensemble Theater, a mainstay and the only thing in the area for ever. After sticking our heads in some of the eclectic shops, we hurry past The Continental Club and Tacos A Go Go and back across Main Street, just south of Alabama, for an art exhibition at Inman gallery, one of several galleries with exhibitions that night, which are housed  in the ground floor of Isabella Court, probably one of the coolest early Houston apartment buildings, with a most remarkable courtyard. We meet up with our friend, and he gives us a quick tour of his new apartment. Afterwards we all head back to catch the late show at Continental Club. This bohemian,  neighborhood spans possibly four or five blocks on both sides of Main and  Milam and packs a wallop and the great thing was,we never had to get in our car.  We ended up for some late night spring rolls at Mai's.  Had a nightcap across from Continental club

After finishing off  a couple Ice coffees, we  connect with our Uber driver and head home. We had  so much fun, with so much to see and do all in one little neighborhood in Midtown. 

What a great night.

 

Now that's what a great neighborhood can offer.

But you can't tear down all of the old just to put up a lot of cold slick steel and glass, mixed use development and get the same funky feel you get in the heart of Midtown.  Its the fabric that makes the difference.

 

 

Good point and great description. As Jane Jacobs said, older buildings are essential in urban neighborhoods because they have the lower rents that allow mom and pop businesses.

 

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There are some great old buildings still hiding out in Midtown on the East side of Main Street. Hopefully as the Aussie's tower goes up , they will be re purposed from urine stained  sleeping sidewalks to more of what you have described. 

 

Great prose by the way. I feel like I was there!

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Thanks. I know that developers want to make money and its not always possible to save every old structure, but Bob Schultz, who opened the Continental Club and developed the surrounding venues along with Mid Main, is as responsible for this part of Midtown as anyone, and he has provided a master plan on  how a developer that is savvy, can mix old and new, to help create that fabric, and hopefully a successful neighborhood. I hope that Caydon realizes this also. There is a plethora of old interesting structures in Midtown just waiting for their rebirth. A great example is Mongoose and Cobra, or 13 degrees Celsius. It just takes someone who is thinking about the big picture. 

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25 minutes ago, bobruss said:

Thanks. I know that developers want to make money and its not always possible to save every old structure, but Bob Schultz, who opened the Continental Club and developed the surrounding venues along with Mid Main, is as responsible for this part of Midtown as anyone, and he has provided a master plan on  how a developer that is savvy, can mix old and new, to help create that fabric, and hopefully a successful neighborhood. I hope that Caydon realizes this also. There is a plethora of old interesting structures in Midtown just waiting for their rebirth. A great example is Mongoose and Cobra, or 13 degrees Celsius. It just takes someone who is thinking about the big picture. 

 

If you are thinking of the Greensheet building, it would have been renovated two years ago if we weren't in a horrible office market. The Central Square building does not look like it's brimming with tenants and that is much closer to the type of product that the average Houston office user desires. It could be a great incubator but we need to wait for the market to absorb the other ones first. If the 600-unit PMRG tower rumor at that spot is real, then it was a bad market plus a perfect location (for other uses) that killed Greensheet.

 

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1 hour ago, MarathonMan said:

I haven’t heard of the 600 unit PMRG tower rumor.   What is that?

 

It appeared on another developer's list of projects and was posted somewhere on these pages.

 

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2 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

If you are thinking of the Greensheet building, it would have been renovated two years ago if we weren't in a horrible office market. The Central Square building does not look like it's brimming with tenants and that is much closer to the type of product that the average Houston office user desires. It could be a great incubator but we need to wait for the market to absorb the other ones first. If the 600-unit PMRG tower rumor at that spot is real, then it was a bad market plus a perfect location (for other uses) that killed Greensheet.

 

No, not at all. I'm actually talking about some of the small one and two story structures that are just lying dormant or underutilized that would make great restaurants bars, stores, service oriented businesses, boutiques, florist, barber shops, coffee houses, donut shops, whatever. Just little neglected buildings that would add character to a block of new glass and steel mid and high rise buildings. People like a comfort zone. I'm not talking about Greensheet sized buildings, however they should be repurposed also. It so much more efficient to salvage whats already here than to tear it down and start over in some cases. Just work with what we have. 

There are plenty of vacant lots for new development.

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19 minutes ago, bobruss said:

I'm actually talking about some of the small one and two story structures that are just lying dormant or underutilized that would make great restaurants bars, stores, service oriented businesses, boutiques, florist, barber shops, coffee houses, donut shops, whatever.

In particular, I hope the block that houses the Wheeler Watch Clinic (and formerly the Venture-N) can be revitalized. It's a little jewel of a building. I only hope that our absurd parking requirements can be waived to allow this to happen.

Wheeler.PNG

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40 minutes ago, dbigtex56 said:

In particular, I hope the block that houses the Wheeler Watch Clinic (and formerly the Venture-N) can be revitalized. It's a little jewel of a building. I only hope that our absurd parking requirements can be waived to allow this to happen.

Wheeler.PNG

 

I agree totally. Short of a major renovation, they should be grandfathered for parking.

 

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18 hours ago, bobruss said:

It would be beneficial for the future of the neighborhood if they could repurpose as many of the early 30's-60's era buildings still standing, especially ones with good bones, within reason. I'm not suggesting that  anyone has to do this, but if they want a successful area it needs to feel good. Those efforts  would provide space for retail, and other conveniences while enhancing the public realm. The idea is to hopefully create an environment that people enjoy living, working and playing in. Diversity of architecture mixing old and new are all important ingredients, and hopefully most developers understand the important role they play. Of course  smart landscaping, lighting, signage and safe sidewalks are all important pieces to the puzzle. As an example...

A recent Friday night in a great little neighborhood.

  Stepped off the train, at a very busy  Ensemble Station and headed across the street, to Match, the new Lake Flato, arts venue, to catch an early lecture. Besides the lecture there was also a performance in one of the theaters. Afterwards, we detoured west to Holmans on Milam, for a quick cocktail on their patio, then headed back over to Main Street, where we turned south for a little food and fun. We worked our way down the next four blocks of retail and entertainment, while trying to decide what kind of food to try with  so many new options and  old reliables. Mid Main, and its row of expanding retail spaces, is the brand new mixed use apartment complex which spans a block and a half and is right in the heart of Ensemble Station.  We stop for a beer at Natchatee, a little hamburger joint with music, and an interesting art collection including a great Art Guys piece. It's a little repurposed bungalow, that  sits just south of Mid Main and it's the first of the  bohemian section which has developed over the years around the Continental club.  Just across Main street lies the Ensemble Theater, a mainstay and the only thing in the area for ever. After sticking our heads in some of the eclectic shops, we hurry past The Continental Club and Tacos A Go Go and back across Main Street, just south of Alabama, for an art exhibition at Inman gallery, one of several galleries with exhibitions that night, which are housed  in the ground floor of Isabella Court, probably one of the coolest early Houston apartment buildings, with a most remarkable courtyard. We meet up with our friend, and he gives us a quick tour of his new apartment. Afterwards we all head back to catch the late show at Continental Club. This bohemian,  neighborhood spans possibly four or five blocks on both sides of Main and  Milam and packs a wallop and the great thing was,we never had to get in our car.  We ended up for some late night spring rolls at Mai's.  Had a nightcap across from Continental club

After finishing off  a couple Ice coffees, we  connect with our Uber driver and head home. We had  so much fun, with so much to see and do all in one little neighborhood in Midtown. 

What a great night.

 

Now that's what a great neighborhood can offer.

But you can't tear down all of the old just to put up a lot of cold slick steel and glass, mixed use development and get the same funky feel you get in the heart of Midtown.  Its the fabric that makes the difference.

 

 

In my opinion the width of the streets in Midtown really work against any neighborhood feeling—the narrower streets on the east side work so much better. If the main arterials could be reconfigured a la Bagby, it’d help a lot. 

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I agree that they're too wide. That would be great. I don't know if they plan on continuing the north south streets like Bagby and soon to be Caroline.The federal govt. had all of the north south streets completely rebuilt with new sidewalks, lighting and landscaping just 18 years ago so I doubt they would want to give us more money to take lanes out. 

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35 minutes ago, bobruss said:

I agree that they're too wide. That would be great. I don't know if they plan on continuing the north south streets like Bagby and soon to be Caroline.The federal govt. had all of the north south streets completely rebuilt with new sidewalks, lighting and landscaping just 18 years ago so I doubt they would want to give us more money to take lanes out. 

 

35 minutes ago, bobruss said:

I agree that they're too wide. That would be great. I don't know if they plan on continuing the north south streets like Bagby and soon to be Caroline.The federal govt. had all of the north south streets completely rebuilt with new sidewalks, lighting and landscaping just 18 years ago so I doubt they would want to give us more money to take lanes out. 

 

Any chance the 45/59 realignment will reduce the Midtown drive-through traffic?

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8 hours ago, Houston19514 said:

It came from this New Development Map that was referenced in another thread

 

https://www.berkadia.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Q2-2018-New-Development-Maps_Houston-FINAL.pdf

I realize they're giving a specific address here but considering that they don't list the other two towers that Caydon has planned here, it seems more reasonable that those 600 units are spread out across all three towers.

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Individual buildings aside, for the purposes of neighborhood feel, I think the distinction between old and new is less important than the distinction between fine-grained and course-grained. By fine-grained, I mean places like the northern end of Main St downtown, the good parts of 19th St, or the area around Natachee's and the Continental Club, where each tenant/owner occupies only a fraction of the block face. So every ten steps or so, you're passing by something different. Course-grained, on the other hand, is when a single use (apartment building, office tower, parking garage, CVS) takes up an entire block face.

 

There's so little good fine-grained development in Houston, it's important to preserve what we have and encourage more. Fine-grained correlates with older buildings, and course-grained with newer development (there are a number of reasons for this, including complexity of regulations, setbacks, parking rules, availability of financing, etc.), but I would give up an old-coarse-grained block for a new fine-grained block with very little hesitation.

 

Back to the topic of the thread: what I like about the "tower on a podium" development style is that you get the feel of a midrise building from the street level, but the density of a high-rise. And if done well, by keeping the laneways narrow and including well-done GFR, you can even get some faux-fine-grained development.

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On 7/27/2018 at 4:43 AM, CrockpotandGravel said:

Here is the first known retail and restaurant tenant for Caydon's The Midtown at 2850 Fannin in Houston: Flying Biscuit Cafe.

https://www.facebook.com/flyingbiscuitcafemidtownhouston/

 

 

Eater Houston wrote about Flying Biscuit opening in Houston

https://houston.eater.com/2018/2/16/17020324/flying-biscuit-cafe-houston-opening-two-locations

 



More on an opening timetable for The Flying Biscuit Cafe, opening at Caydon's The Midtown at 2850 Fannin in Houston.


A second Houston location [Flying Biscuit] is set for 2019.
https://www.chron.com/business/real-estate/article/Retail-wrap-Fortress-BeerWorks-heading-to-13138391.php

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This thread has some great suggestions regarding Midtown that align with a number of efforts underway.  The entirety of Midtown is currently working with COH Plannning & Development to address/change ordinances to encourage some of the very things I'm reading above, here. 

 

If you have the time and interest P&D has the final public workshop for the Walkable Places Pilot Project on September 6, 2018 at Trinity Episcopal (Main Street entrance) from 4:00 to 6:00.  

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/241468949940281/

 

Mark your calendar.

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17 hours ago, Diaspora said:

This thread has some great suggestions regarding Midtown that align with a number of efforts underway.  The entirety of Midtown is currently working with COH Plannning & Development to address/change ordinances to encourage some of the very things I'm reading above, here. 

 

If you have the time and interest P&D has the final public workshop for the Walkable Places Pilot Project on September 6, 2018 at Trinity Episcopal (Main Street entrance) from 4:00 to 6:00.  

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/241468949940281/

 

Mark your calendar.

 

There was talk of extending the area exempt from parking minimums all the way to 59 on the south and the spur on the west. Did this make it into the final recommendation? 

 

 

 

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On 8/9/2018 at 11:08 PM, Triton said:

I realize they're giving a specific address here but considering that they don't list the other two towers that Caydon has planned here, it seems more reasonable that those 600 units are spread out across all three towers.

 

But it's a different developer. Caydon is not PM Realty Group.

 

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Did they buy the Art Supply building? It's on the platting agenda this week as moving to Almeda and Oakdale.

 

Quote

e. A down-sized version of The Art Supply at 2711 Main Street will be relocated to the proposed site resulting in a smaller area building, while maintaining the same mixture of uses of their current store, including art studios and living spaces. Like the current location on Main Street, they intend to create a building that will be attractive to those driving or walking.

 

Quote

(5) Economic hardship is not the sole justification of the variance. Economic hardship is not the justification of this variance. The justification for this variance is the need and desire of the developers to provide a pedestrian, eyes-on-the-street, safe, and visually active addition to the Almeda corridor. The irony of this proposal is that the conditions at the current location on Main Street have created an economic hardship forcing the move from Main Street to this site on Almeda. 

 

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