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Oscar Colquitt (Yale Street) Bridge


IronTiger

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It's open. You can drive the entire length of Yale from near 45 North to where it turns into Waugh. It's actually a pretty cool drive. There's the site prep for the new Booker T Washington high school, the future site of the 365 market, sites in the Heights due for redevelopment, etc.

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I haven't seen any signage posted yet indicating an imminent closure, so I'd say it's safe to assume that it will still be open on Thursday. IIRC, they were going to start the rebuilding project sometime in February.

Where did you see a Feb start? I had only seen references to EOY. They did recently do some utility pole work that removed an old structure close to the bridge. I live very close and will be considerably impacted by the closure.

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Where did you see a Feb start? I had only seen references to EOY. They did recently do some utility pole work that removed an old structure close to the bridge. I live very close and will be considerably impacted by the closure.

 

This piece from the Chron was written at the end of September, and says "within the next six months":

 

http://www.chron.com/neighborhood/heights/news/article/Yale-Street-bridge-awaits-destruction-6540318.php

 

Traffic is already bad during rush hour on Yale near I-10 in both directions, so I imagine it's really going to suck once the construction starts and Yale isn't an option for through traffic for the duration of the project. 

Edited by mkultra25
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  • 2 months later...

The thing that amazes me is that apparently this bridge will be closed for 18 months.  We can all thank the WalMart NIMBY's who scrutinized this in their effort to stop Walmart for the new, presumably safer bridge we get, but we can also thank them for the cluster this is about to become.  In their glee, when they found out that this bridge wouldnt handle WalMart's trucks, they got it named a historic bridge, in an attempt to make it so WalMart could never replace it. However, all it really means, is that now instead of being eligible for state/federal money to replace, the city has to pay all of the costs and we get a nice fat year and half timeline for a simple bridge replacement.

Edited by JJxvi
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31 minutes ago, JJxvi said:

The thing that amazes me is that apparently this bridge will be closed for 18 months.  We can all thank the WalMart NIMBY's who scrutinized this in their effort to stop Walmart for the new, presumably safer bridge we get, but we can also thank them for the cluster this is about to become.  In their glee, when they found out that this bridge wouldnt handle WalMart's trucks, they got it named a historic bridge, in an attempt to make it so WalMart could never replace it. However, all it really means, is that now instead of being eligible for state/federal money to replace, the city has to pay all of the costs and we get a nice fat year and half timeline for a simple bridge replacement.

From the chron article:

"The federal Highway Bridge Program will cover 80 percent of the costs; the state will pay the remaining 20 percent."

Last I checked, 80 + 20=100, meaning the City of Houston pays nothing to replace the bridge.  The stuff about the bridge being ineligible for funding due to historic some historic designation is pure fiction.

But you are right that we should thank the anti-Walmart campaign.  They found out that the bridge was not structurally sound and worked hard to get plans in place to replace the bridge.  TxDOT and that City were completely asleep at the wheel as far as keeping track of the bridge's condition and planning for needed repairs and eventual replacement, despite TxDOT knowing that the bridge would see greatly increased traffic with the feeder road expansion and the City knowing that Walmart and the other development in the area would mean increase semitrailer traffic.  But for the civic activism, the issue of the bridge would not have come to light for years and then only when it became an emergency situation due to continual over load use.  Instead of keeping the bridge open with temporary repairs while planning for replacement, the bridge could have been subject to an emergency shutdown and taken years to scramble the funds and construction to replace it. 

The real fault in all of this lies with TxDOT and the City.  They pushed the feeder and Walmart development and hoped to sweep the issue of the condition of the bridge under the rug.  It should have been replaced when the feeder was expanded and there were closures of Yale St. in place or, at the latest, as part of the Walmart 380 agreement.  But the City and TxDOT at best were oblivious to it and at worst hoped to sweep it under the rug.  The facts are that the bridge is falling apart and must be replaced. 

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5 minutes ago, s3mh said:

From the chron article:

"The federal Highway Bridge Program will cover 80 percent of the costs; the state will pay the remaining 20 percent."

Last I checked, 80 + 20=100, meaning the City of Houston pays nothing to replace the bridge.  The stuff about the bridge being ineligible for funding due to historic some historic designation is pure fiction.

I stand corrected then, on that point, assuming you and the Chronicle are correct.

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Also wrong about the "Walmart NIMBY's" getting it declared historic so Walmart could never replace it.  Although Walmart isn't replacing it.  

The same guy who got the McKee street bridge named historic did that.  And it's irrelevant if it's actually been declared historic or just eligible, they still have to follow the same path which included offering it for sale.  

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/5/2016 at 11:46 AM, s3mh said:

From the chron article:

"The federal Highway Bridge Program will cover 80 percent of the costs; the state will pay the remaining 20 percent."

Last I checked, 80 + 20=100, meaning the City of Houston pays nothing to replace the bridge.  The stuff about the bridge being ineligible for funding due to historic some historic designation is pure fiction.

But you are right that we should thank the anti-Walmart campaign.  They found out that the bridge was not structurally sound and worked hard to get plans in place to replace the bridge.  TxDOT and that City were completely asleep at the wheel as far as keeping track of the bridge's condition and planning for needed repairs and eventual replacement, despite TxDOT knowing that the bridge would see greatly increased traffic with the feeder road expansion and the City knowing that Walmart and the other development in the area would mean increase semitrailer traffic.  But for the civic activism, the issue of the bridge would not have come to light for years and then only when it became an emergency situation due to continual over load use.  Instead of keeping the bridge open with temporary repairs while planning for replacement, the bridge could have been subject to an emergency shutdown and taken years to scramble the funds and construction to replace it. 

The real fault in all of this lies with TxDOT and the City.  They pushed the feeder and Walmart development and hoped to sweep the issue of the condition of the bridge under the rug.  It should have been replaced when the feeder was expanded and there were closures of Yale St. in place or, at the latest, as part of the Walmart 380 agreement.  But the City and TxDOT at best were oblivious to it and at worst hoped to sweep it under the rug.  The facts are that the bridge is falling apart and must be replaced. 

Why is it the Yale St bridge is declared unsafe, but the Heights bridge is OK?  The two must be the same age, at least they look the same and they have the same design. Maybe the city overreacted to  complaints about the bridge and chose to replace it because of publicity created by the Walmart nimby's. It's more political than structural.  Of course all bridges eventually need replacement - Unfortunately the Yale street bridge is getting it earlier than necessary.  I do believe the anti-Walmart zealots are to blame for this. It isn't even an unintended consequence, The anti-Walmart's would burn down the city to stop Walmart.  The end justifies the means with them.

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The Heights bridges were rebuilt like 20 years ago.  The Yale Street Bridge is 80 years old.  Bridges are designed to last 50 years.  How is it getting replaced early?   Why don't you get a group of 5 or 6 other people together and see if you can get a perfectly fine bridge closed to prove your point?  Please keep us posted on your progress.  

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Heights Boulevard  Bridge rebuilt 20 years ago?  I don't think so.  The lamp posts were replaced in 1991, that's all.  The Heights bridge was built in 1922 and has not been rebuilt.  Who says bridges are designed to last only 50 years? You think all Houston bridges built before 1966 are obsolete?  The bridge should be refurbished, not replaced, and not require a two year shut-down.  But, thanks to the political storm created by anti-Walmart fanatics we have a mess...thank you very much.

 

 

HeightsBridgePlaque.jpg

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The Heights bridges were either rebuilt or rehabilitated in 1997 according to the federal bridge data.  

 

I agree that the Yale Street Bridge should be rehabilitated and not replaced.  All of the bridge reports say it should be rehabilitated and not replaced.  

 

You are clearly wrong about the anti Walmart crowd about burning down Houston to get rid of Walmart.  As far as I can tell, both Walmart and Houston are still here, unburnt.  

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Heights Bridge was rehabilitated in 1997 - I believe the Yale St bridge was also rehabilitated in the same project. So why is the Yale bridge being destroyed and not the Heights bridge?  Answer - politics.

 

Yes Walmart is here, and a critical neighborhood bridge is being demolished.  Professional engineers all recommended rehabilitation, not demolition and construction of a new bridge. The motivation to destroy the bridge is suspect and smacks of revenge, and another attempt to drive Walmart away.

Edited by OutfieldDan
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Excuse the interjection gentlemen, but I can confirm the dual bridges on Heights were indeed rebuilt in 1997, as a longtime Heights resident that commuted through the south end of the Heights on a daily basis back then. The SB bridge was closed first, with two way traffic utilizing the NB bridge. Once the SB bridge was completed, the traffic flow was reversed and the NB bridge replaced. The reason the dual Heights bridges look like they do is because many of the old Heights residents went haywire when the thought of a modern looking set of bridges replacing the old ones were contemplated. The lamps themselves have been replaced several times over the years, or at least the glass globes on top. Likely all of them have been broken at one point or another in my 49 years of life. Some of them many times.

 

Yale's bridge has never rebuilt until now, and why it wasn't is as much of a mystery to me as the old Southern Pacific spur bridge over the bayou remaining next to it to this very day. There hasn't been a freight rail there in years. Why that one remnant of the line still stands is flat out ridiculous to me and terribly ugly to boot. 

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Btw, IronTiger, next time you're wanting to drive the continuous length of Yale, come on up to the north end and say hello! You might be interested to know there's even a small section of Yale on the north side of 45 that not everyone even realizes exists.

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1 hour ago, Purpledevil said:

 

Yale's bridge has never rebuilt until now, and why it wasn't is as much of a mystery to me as the old Southern Pacific spur bridge over the bayou remaining next to it to this very day. There hasn't been a freight rail there in years. Why that one remnant of the line still stands is flat out ridiculous to me and terribly ugly to boot. 

 

It's still there because it's part of the hydrology of White Oak Bayou according to the Harris County Flood Control District.

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So that rusty, old steel trestle sitting on wooden pylons next to Yale assists in the improvement of Buffalo Bayou's water quality and movement? Sorry, but I'm skeptical of the District's reasoning for allowing it to remain. Likely more about the cost involved in bringing it down. If that's the case, there should at least be some type of upkeep performed on it. Perhaps a good coating of silver paint on the steel, and a hearty weed wacking to get all of the overgrowth off of it. It would make a nice enough canvas for an artist, along the lines of what the 11th street post office looks like now.

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17 hours ago, Purpledevil said:

So that rusty, old steel trestle sitting on wooden pylons next to Yale assists in the improvement of Buffalo Bayou's water quality and movement? Sorry, but I'm skeptical of the District's reasoning for allowing it to remain. Likely more about the cost involved in bringing it down. If that's the case, there should at least be some type of upkeep performed on it. Perhaps a good coating of silver paint on the steel, and a hearty weed wacking to get all of the overgrowth off of it. It would make a nice enough canvas for an artist, along the lines of what the 11th street post office looks like now.

It's there because it can't be removed without a complete study of the potential impacts on downstream flooding. That's the same reason it took years to remove the unused bridge over White Oak Bayou East of TC Jester. The study for that one was done as part of the bike trail project, I believe.

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19 hours ago, Purpledevil said:

So that rusty, old steel trestle sitting on wooden pylons next to Yale assists in the improvement of Buffalo Bayou's water quality and movement? Sorry, but I'm skeptical of the District's reasoning for allowing it to remain. Likely more about the cost involved in bringing it down. If that's the case, there should at least be some type of upkeep performed on it. Perhaps a good coating of silver paint on the steel, and a hearty weed wacking to get all of the overgrowth off of it. It would make a nice enough canvas for an artist, along the lines of what the 11th street post office looks like now.

I would guess it's more of "who owns it" and the problems associated with that. It originally connected the MKT and SP lines (and probably serviced a business or two) and would likely be the responsibility of UP, though since the city got to use part of the MKT right of way for a bike path (or was it bought by TxDOT and then sub-leased to the city), it might be theirs. So is it the city? TxDOT? Union Pacific? A business that went under 15+ years ago? That might be the issue...

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14 minutes ago, IronTiger said:

I would guess it's more of "who owns it" and the problems associated with that. It originally connected the MKT and SP lines (and probably serviced a business or two) and would likely be the responsibility of UP, though since the city got to use part of the MKT right of way for a bike path (or was it bought by TxDOT and then sub-leased to the city), it might be theirs. So is it the city? TxDOT? Union Pacific? A business that went under 15+ years ago? That might be the issue...

 

14 minutes ago, IronTiger said:

I would guess it's more of "who owns it" and the problems associated with that. It originally connected the MKT and SP lines (and probably serviced a business or two) and would likely be the responsibility of UP, though since the city got to use part of the MKT right of way for a bike path (or was it bought by TxDOT and then sub-leased to the city), it might be theirs. So is it the city? TxDOT? Union Pacific? A business that went under 15+ years ago? That might be the issue...

We're about 20 feet west of the original topic of the Oscar Colquitt bridge, but hey...it's your thread. :lol: 

 

The M-K-T and SP lines did not connect at any point in the two lines existence. They ran parallel to one another for a few hundred yards west of Yale, then the SP spur crossed the Katy line as a diamond en route to Nicholson. Southern Pacific owned the trestle over White Oak Bayou, as it did the entire spur, and it had been abandoned and the switch cut off from the mainline prior to the UP/SP merger in 1996. Most of the right of way has apparently been bought up by the City, which allowed Nicholson to be widened between west 17th & 19th, while the bike trail paralleling Nicholson took up the rest. Where the Katy trail is currently, follows the original Katy line, not the SP line that ran about 20 or so feet directly south of what's now the east/westbound Katy bike trail. Where the SP line's ROW turned south just before Yale, then paralleled Yale crossing west 6th, 5th, and 4th, has all been taken in by private property now. The Katy Freeway feeder roads did not exist when the spur was still there, meaning TXDOT must've purchased the tract of ROW on each side of the overpass at some point, and then the Walmart property took the remainder of the spur up to where it switched into the northern mainline just east of Bonner, for the parking lot and adjacent business strips that front the Walmart building itself.

 

That leaves only the question of the trestle, which after Allison flooded White Oak bayou as badly as it did in 2001, had the wooden pylons removed from each side of the banks, leaving only the steel trestle and concrete pylons in the middle. Whoever is responsible for the bayou itself, is likely also the trestle's responsible caretaker. That may very well lie on the Bayou Preservation Society's doorstep, or it may be the COH, but I certainly don't know for sure. I can assure you that it is not the Union Pacific Railroad.

 

The SP spur served an industrial steel warehouse on West 25th at the northern terminus, a couple of small paper companies between 23rd and 24th, a warehouse on West 18th, and they used to store boxcars between West 19th and West 23rd on the doubled siding that was there. As kids, we used to play in those boxcars, as the railroad would leave the doors open on the cars most of the time, allowing trucks to pull alongside for unloading purposes.

 

I can't tell you how many times I got my butt whipped by my folks after Mrs. Cates, who lived on West 22nd, would call my mother and father griping that me and her grandson were playing down there on those dang train tracks again! One time, we were playing inside of one, when a switcher engine latched up to the row of boxcars and started pulling them off the siding and back towards the mainline. Talk about not knowing what to do; if we jumped off and ran we were busted for sure! The switchmen had no qualms with giving us kids the "what for" for playing around on their equipment. 

 

Good times...life was so much more simple in those days.

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6 minutes ago, Purpledevil said:

 

We're about 20 feet west of the original topic of the Oscar Colquitt bridge, but hey...it's your thread. :lol: 

 

The M-K-T and SP lines did not connect at any point in the two lines existence. They ran parallel to one another for a few hundred yards west of Yale, then the SP spur crossed the Katy line as a diamond en route to Nicholson. Southern Pacific owned the trestle over White Oak Bayou, as it did the entire spur, and it had been abandoned and the switch cut off from the mainline prior to the UP/SP merger in 1996. Most of the right of way has apparently been bought up by the City, which allowed Nicholson to be widened between west 17th & 19th, while the bike trail paralleling Nicholson took up the rest. Where the Katy trail is currently, follows the original Katy line, not the SP line that ran about 20 or so feet directly south of what's now the east/westbound Katy bike trail. Where the SP line's ROW turned south just before Yale, then paralleled Yale crossing west 6th, 5th, and 4th, has all been taken in by private property now. The Katy Freeway feeder roads did not exist when the spur was still there, meaning TXDOT must've purchased the tract of ROW on each side of the overpass at some point, and then the Walmart property took the remainder of the spur up to where it switched into the northern mainline just east of Bonner, for the parking lot and adjacent business strips that front the Walmart building itself.

 

That leaves only the question of the trestle, which after Allison flooded White Oak bayou as badly as it did in 2001, had the wooden pylons removed from each side of the banks, leaving only the steel trestle and concrete pylons in the middle. Whoever is responsible for the bayou itself, is likely also the trestle's responsible caretaker. That may very well lie on the Bayou Preservation Society's doorstep, or it may be the COH, but I certainly don't know for sure. I can assure you that it is not the Union Pacific Railroad.

 

The SP spur served an industrial steel warehouse on West 25th at the northern terminus, a couple of small paper companies between 23rd and 24th, a warehouse on West 18th, and they used to store boxcars between West 19th and West 23rd on the doubled siding that was there. As kids, we used to play in those boxcars, as the railroad would leave the doors open on the cars most of the time, allowing trucks to pull alongside for unloading purposes.

 

I can't tell you how many times I got my butt whipped by my folks after Mrs. Cates, who lived on West 22nd, would call my mother and father griping that me and her grandson were playing down there on those dang train tracks again! One time, we were playing inside of one, when a switcher engine latched up to the row of boxcars and started pulling them off the siding and back towards the mainline. Talk about not knowing what to do; if we jumped off and ran we were busted for sure! The switchmen had no qualms with giving us kids the "what for" for playing around on their equipment. 

 

Good times...life was so much more simple in those days.

I know that the Katy Trail doesn't follow "exactly" the line, especially close to the beginning, and that there wasn't a way near the Eureka Yards for the SP (the one that paralleled 290 and Washington), but in the 2002 aerial shot in Google Earth, the earliest shot available that's clear, you can note that the spur is still connected and continued almost to Koehler as an active spur. Sometime around 2009 or 2010 all this was torn down and what was left of the spur was dismantled. Up until the Walmart redevelopment changed the area, the tracks could still be seen at Koehler, even though by 2002 the spur north had long been abandoned. In 1989 all this was still visible (but not '95) and it does indeed continue as a parallel track to the MKT, not a direct connection. It is here where a spur connects to the warehouses on 6th Street (the shape of the buildings still pay true to their railroad spur heritage). Following the line, at Waverly (just east of the railroad crossing), a north spur crosses the MKT and parallels Nicholson (this is now also a bike path). However, it continues to appear west (Waverly appears to have three tracks crossing it) and the line merges between Nicholson and Herkimer. This is also supported by the 1978 aerial. 

 

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In my head, yes. It's all mapped out, lol. Tiger, can you give him the Google earth view. I'm not technically inclined enough to make that attachment happen.

 

You are correct, a part of the SP spur indeed continued onto the warehouse on Waverly. The SP line and MKT line never had a switch between them, moving SP traffic onto the Katy line and vise versa. I thought that was what you had mentioned previously; I must've misunderstood.

 

That spur was long abandoned before 2002. I haven't seen rail traffic on that SP spur since the 80's...maybe early, early 90's. Couldn't have been. The West 8th grade crossing was paved over in front of the elementary school due to the grade being made out of wood, which rotted and after being rolled over by all the school buses, became one hell of a mess to drive over before the city laid asphalt over it.

 

My God, how do I remember this worthless information after all this time, but can't tell you everything I did just yesterday?

 

Guess it's because I've always had a fascination with freight trains...just as I do with the radio dial. The Espee was my favorite line, the Katy a very close second. Loved those old red geeps on the Katy, and the always dirty as could be bloody nosed Espee & Cotton Belt power.

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39 minutes ago, SamHouston said:

Loving this topic, but it's tough to follow. Anyone have a map/maps/schematic?

 

Download Google Earth (the actual application—the mobile version or the browser-embedded version won't work)

Navigate to Yale Street and Koehler Street, where the Walmart and other stores are.

Go to the image of the clock in the upper left corner and drag the slider from 2016 to 1978.

At this point, the image of the stores should disappear and be replaced with a rather fuzzy picture of how that part of town looked in the late 1970s.

Follow the railroad bridge north and everything should make sense, hopefully.

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15 hours ago, Ross said:

It's there because it can't be removed without a complete study of the potential impacts on downstream flooding. That's the same reason it took years to remove the unused bridge over White Oak Bayou East of TC Jester. The study for that one was done as part of the bike trail project, I believe.

What impact? We're talking about a few concrete pylons sticking into the earth here, not a dam or a wall. The only thing that would be affected is that the trash and debris floating down White Oak would no longer get entangled around the base of it. Instead, it'd get caught up in 20 more feet on the Colquitt bridge. :mellow: There's the study; signed, sealed, and delivered...and it didn't cost thousands of taxpayer dollars to conduct it.

 

I swear, common sense doesn't run rampant within our elected officials community. :rolleyes:

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Removing an obstruction has an effect downstream.  The pylons may not be that big a deal - or they might - a hydrologist could tell us.  Regardless, the trestle structure on top of the pylons will also act as a dam and slow down water once it gets that high.  Speeding up an upstream drainage without a corresponding increase in downstream capacity means that those in the middle get flooded more frequently - for an up close and personal look, ask Meyerland.  FEMA and HCFCD now have regulations and a process that need to be followed to try to avoid that result, even if the result seems intuitive.

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Ok, I'll buy that. So, what happens then if we receive another huge deluge, resulting in White Oak topping its banks again while the Colquitt bridge's pylons and deck are being replaced during reconstruction? Wouldn't we experience the same perceived catastrophic result as we would if trestle next to it were to be removed? The bridge is supported by concrete pylons as well, which will require total replacement too, will they not?

 

I'm simply not following the logic as to how the bridge itself can be demolished for a total rebuild without any ill effects to bayou's water flow, yet the railroad trestle literally within a few feet of the same bridge requires an apparent mile of red tape to bring the unsightly and unnecessary structure down. 

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13 hours ago, mollusk said:

Bridge pylons aren't necessarily replaced during a rebuild, and a rebuild is a temporary situation regardless.

Not necessarily, but they could very well be. The Heights bridges, if memory serves, were replaced as well as the deck. If, during the time it takes to replace the pylons during the rebuild of Yale's, we get another storm that stalls out over the Heights just like the one last week did over Cypress and north Houston, wouldn't we experience the exact same scenario feared with the removal of the trestle? The Oscar Colquitt bridge is a significantly wider structure than the trestle. I do not understand how the trestle could cause a massive uptick in flood potential downstream, if removed, yet there's apparently no cause for concern if a catastrophic flood were to occur during this project. This is Houston, after all, and when it rains, it sometimes really pours. Having grown up with White Oak bayou, I very well know just how bad that particular waterway can flood. I'm not following the thought processing difference between a rather narrow railroad trestle causing such fear of altering the amount of water flow, but not a 4 lane bridge mere feet to the east of it, while it's under construction.

 

Maybe it's just the way it's coming off with regards to intent of my posts on this particular matter. Sometimes, it's hard to judge intent from what one reads, not knowing the author's tone nor mindset. I'm certainly not attempting to be argumentative, only wishing for education in the rationale of what makes one bridge destruction differ from the other.

 

Leonard: White Oak's water flow did not reach the deck of either Yale nor Heights Blvd bridges. My neighbor is a manager at the Sprouts right there, and they were wide open for business all day, with no major flooding in the immediate area. It was bad, but as mollusk duly noted, not near as bad as Allison.

 

At least not there. People in Greenspoint, Willowbrook, Katy, & Cy-Fair would most likely disagree with that statement. I personally worked in the Greenspoint area for over 20 years, and have never witnessed what Greens Bayou did to the immediate area like it did last week before. That was most assuredly the worst flooding in GP that I've ever personally seen. The video on KTRK and KRIV simply blew me away. North Belt, Hardy, and the North Freeway always flood in a heavy rain event, but to see Imperial Valley, Benmar, and Greens Rd. turned into absolute canals had me completely awestruck.

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Well it's closed now, and traffic as expected, is pretty horrendous in this area.  Hopefully as the months roll on and people alter their routes it will subside.  I need to head over to Heights/Koehler and see if they put in any type of traffic control since there isn't a permanent light there. 

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11 hours ago, Leonard said:

did the water come over the bridge last week?  

 

the long time given to replace the bridge makes me think they will replace the pylons, but the low price makes me think they won't.  

 

Nope, was about a foot below it. 

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When I came through the Yale intersection (EB I-10 frontage road, continuing to a left/north at Heights) mid afternoon it was a flashing red as they were monkeying with some temporary signals.

 

So do we think this will be the new norm? Or are they configuring it for a two-way signal? I've been getting off at Yale the last few years and am reconsidering the olde Studemont u-turn.

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  • 2 weeks later...

@Leonard and Purlpledevil,

 

When I drove to work on 4/18 around 9 or 10 AM I saw the bayou flowing over the deck of the Heights bridges and was forced to drive over the Yale bridge. Luckily the Yale bridge was left open even though that was the original date it was supposed to be closed.

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