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East Village Mixed-Use Development at 1201 St. Emanuel

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I heard from someone in the real estate community that this property traded hands.

 

Does anyone know what the new owners plans are? I believe the restaurant depot store has already shut down.

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I believe that property is going to be developed into mixed use with retail and creative/community work spaces. It may also incorporate part of the block south... next to the building being developed into the comedy club.

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Ancorian's new retail development at 1201 St. Emanuel, East Village is coming soon. From their website:
 

 

East Village is a 60,000 SF mixed use project in the heart of east downtown Houston. The project is the first of its kind in EaDo and includes concepts from some of Houston and Dallas’ most talented and respected operators.

More from Swamplot

 

 

Houston’s Own East Village Planned Next to 8th Wonder Brewery in East Downtown
 

From the folks currently in the process of bringing you Heights Mercantile: plans for East Village, a 2-block mixed-use complex planned along St. Emanuel and Hutchins Sts. between Polk and Lamar in East Downtown — a few blocks south of the Dynamo’s BBVA Compass Stadium, and across 59 from the George R. Brown Convention Center and Discovery Green. Real estate investment and development firm Ancordian (founded by Finial co-founders Neil Martin and Michael Sperandio with Matthew Donowho) is behind the development; as of two months ago, land for the project (across the street from the Yen Huong Bakery and the now-closed Kim Hung Supermarket) was still being acquired.

 

A few renderings are up on the Ancordian portfolio website — the view above is of a Lamar-facing courtyard and a renovated version of the warehouse currently housing Kitchen Depot. But a presentation dated late November shows many additional angles, siteplans, and renderings of the planned development, one block of which is credited to the design firm of Austin-based Michael Hsu, and the other to Māk Studio Architecture:

 

Māk did the 1201 St. Emanuel St. block (on the left above, south of Dallas St. across Hutchins from 8th Wonder); a more detailed view of the siteplan includes a “creative office” space tucked into the L of the forthcoming Secret Group comedy club, as well as retail spaces, a parking lot, and an area labeled for Air BNB rental:

 

A conceptual rendering of the corner of Dallas St. and St. Emanuel (bottom right in the site plan above) incorporates the structure of an existing warehouse on the site:

 

Meanwhile, on the north side of Dallas St., Hsu’s section (referred to as 2118 Lamar in the presentation deck) includes several large outdoor areas, an office building, restaurants, and a distillery:

More conceptual renderings also incorporate some existing structures into their designs — check out the corner of Lamar and St. Emmanuel:

 

 

 

 

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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The distillery at 2118 Lamar St, corner of Lamar and Hutchins at EaDo's East Village is Our/Vodka, according to CultureMap and Twitter.

12501711_165765093788185_642767738_n.jpg
[Photo from Our Houston Vodka on Instagram]

 

 

From CultureMap

 

 

Vodka-fueled party place headed to EaDo as international distillery teams up with Houston duo

 

Two Houstonians who are experts in helping other people have a good time are bringing the city a new place to party, fundraise and compete. Fresh off the success of the Day for Night festival, Omar Afra and Dutch Small have joined forces to open a Houston branch of the global Our/Vodka project in East Downtown. 

 

Established in Sweden in partnership with spirits giant Pernod Ricard, Our/Vodka is a series of micro distilleries in cities around the world including Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Detroit and Seattle. In each city, the company partners with creatively-minded people who help source local ingredients for the vodka and program events at the distillery. Currently working its way through the permitting process, the facility should open later this year.

 

"One day I get a call from this guy named Thurman," Afra recalls. "He says, 'Yo man. Opening a distillery in Houston, are you interested?' I said, 'Who are you and where did you get my phone number?' He said, 'I’ve been researching you and looking for you. This one real estate guy had your number. Why don’t you let me come talk to you?'"

 

After a meeting, Afra and Small flew to meet with the Our/Vodka partners in the other cities.

 

"It’s a really rad group of people. Everybody in these respective cities are cool. They’re kind of the Dutch and Omar of Amsterdam, Detroit . . . We decided to move forward on it. From there, we’re here now."

 

The vodka itself will be packaged in a clear bottle with a simple label and a signature crown cap. While the spirit in the bottle is an important part of what's happening, Afra and Small are excited about the distillery's potential as event space for non-profit organizations. 

 

With 3,000 square feet of space available to 501c3 organizations at select times "for gatherings of any kind" and 1,500 square-feet of space "attached to the distillery for galas or other events geared towards raising funds for non-profits," the distillery will likely become a major fundraising destination. A 600 square-foot patio will also be available either separately or in conjunction with the other spaces.

 

"The most sexy part about this was the way this program fits into the community," Afra says. "It’s got a lovely geography where it both works with and helps the local community of non-profits and entrepreneurs. It (also) ties Houston into this global movement."

 

Afra adds that it's up to the individual groups to determine how groups to use the space and what kind of events they hold there. He and Small are hoping the opportunity fosters creativity. 

 

"We’ve worked with so many non-profits. People are constantly getting in our ears about 'hey, I need a space for this non-profit event.' There’s not a lot of great spaces for non-profits to program in at no cost. We’re glad to offer this space for that," Afra says.

 

In addition to fundraising events, the duo also have plans to allow organizations to hold fundraising happy hours at the distillery, and Small will plan bartender and chefs competitions similar in spirit to the Thanksgiving Leftover Throwdown he organized in 2013.

 

 

 

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More on the distillery Our/Vodka aka Our Vodka Houston at 2118 Lamar St from Houston Chronicle:
 

 

Local names plan launch of a Houston vodka micro-distillery east of downtown

 

 

An East End block lined with nondescript warehouses and commercial buildings doesn't offer much in the way of atmosphere now.

 

But it's here, at the corner of Hutchins and Lamar, where a brain trust of local names will build an event destination anchored by their upcoming Houston vodka micro-distillery Our/Houston.

 

Free Press Houston publisher Omar Afra and public relations guru Dutch Small have become staples in the local arts and music scene for launching such successful events as Free Press Summer Fest and – just this past December – Day For Night.

 

Afra and Small were drawn to 2118 Lamar because of their affinity for this neighborhood, as well as its proximity to 8th Wonder Brewery. Our/Houston's 4,200-square-foot structure – which will house both the distillery and and venue– is about a block north of 8th Wonder. Afra, Small and the 8th Wonder brewery owners plan on hosting street festivals along Hutchins, the street that connects both of their sites. Along with block parties, the distillery's event space will be used and leased out for charity events, public receptions and private parties. Small says the warehouse will see a renovation overhaul by product launch time, sometime around fall 2016.

 

"It's going to be made right here in Houston, right off of St. Emanuel. This is not one of those vodkas that comes in on an aircraft carrier that's distributed to a dozen people who put a sticker on it," Afra says. "It will use local ingredients to create the distillate."

 

The global connection

The duo is working in collaboration with France-based spirits powerhouse Pernod Ricard and with Åsa Caap of Sweden-based Great Works to launch the local Our/Houston micro-distillery. While these investors may have headquarters abroad – far from Houston's up-and-coming east-of-downtown neighborhood – the duo explain that Great Works' goal is to impact major, evolving metropolises.

 

Great Works' mission is two-fold: create a profitable product that translates to markets around the world and connect with key creative community players in these major cities.

 

The corporation reached out to Small and Afra – who have individually and collectively amassed an assemblage of local talent, from writers to musicians and artists – to be the Houston branch of the global project. The pair have creative-minded counterparts with Our/Houston plants in New York City, Seattle, Amsterdam, Berlin, Detroit, London, Los Angeles and Miami.

"The great thing about it is, this isn't going to be a ticketed venue," Afra says. "This is going to be a place where you can say, 'Hey I'm in this burgeoning neighborhood with a brewery down the road. I can hop in here and see a great art show by a local artist, or a great art show from Amsterdam that we brought in via our partners in Amsterdam.'"

 

"It gives me stronger tools to do the things I've already been doing," Small says.

 

Afra is quick to explain that this isn't "something to subsidize Omar and Dutch's existing projects," but he admits that the profit from this launch will help them accomplish certain other goals; he cites bringing in international artists as an example.

 

The product's Houston connection

The liquid itself is intended to taste markedly different from city to city, so Houston's vodka will have a unique flavor profile. Visually, the product's packaging won't match the current standard. The sleek, modern bottle is a smaller, 375-milliliter container. "It's about the size of a Red Stripe. This is something you share with friends," Afra says.

 

Vodka has traditionally been the bar industry's most lucrative product, selling in higher volume that most other spirits. Within the service industry, it's often denounced for its lack of flavor nuance.

 

"All bad vodkas taste the same, much like all bad tequilas might as well be the same garbage, but this is a really beautiful, high-quality vodka," Afra says.

 

It's also a spirit that offers flexibility, since it adapts to most cocktails ideas. And that, for a diverse group of artists, is the ideal blank canvas.

 

 


 

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From Houston Chronicle:

 

 

EaDo developer opts to reuse rather than tear down

 

Two aging midcentury industrial buildings on the east side of downtown have been spared demolition by a local development company that plans to remake them into a mixed-use space and continue the trend of rehabilitating older structures in the transitioning neighborhood.

 

"Instead of wiping them out, we wanted to bring them back to life and create something unique," said Neil Martin, a partner in Ancorian.

 

He said developers worked for about a year to piece the land together at Hutchins, St. Emanuel and Dallas streets. They vied with townhome developers for the land.

 

The Ancorian project, dubbed East Village, will include 60,000 square feet just a few blocks from the Metro light rail line and BBVA Compass Stadium. Preliminary renderings show storefronts incorporating the original industrial architecture with brick and metal siding and bike racks in front. They show a grassy open area with picnic tables and trees with hanging lights filling part of the development that is now a large truck parking zone.

 

"We have really cool buildings and structures that we want to take advantage of," said Michael Sperandio, another Ancorian partner. "The area is so transitional. That's what drew us to the East End."

 

The two buildings will ultimately have space for between 10 to 15 retail and commercial tenants. The developers say that before construction begins, the space will be 65 percent leased. Already on board are a vodka distillery and an architecture firm, Three Square Design Group. The project is slated for completion as early as this summer.

 

The East Downtown area, known locally as EaDo, has blossomed in recent years to become a mix of original homes and buildings and built-from-scratch townhome developments. Recently, several developers in the neighborhood have announced projects to revitalize older buildings into hip projects that could give a bigger boost to the neighborhood just east of U.S. 59, said Anton Sinkewich, executive director of the East Downtown Management District.

 

The predominantly Hispanic neighborhood boasts a tight-knit community of older residents as well as the soccer stadium, which opened for Dynamo fans in 2012. The even newer 8th Wonder Brewery is within walking distance of the stadium and the East Village project.

 

Vacant lots, industrial buildings and overgrown land still cover much of the area, but Sinkewich cited other adaptive-reuse pro-jects on the books. They include plans to reuse a former coffee plant and to turn a former furniture building into lofts.

 

Preserving character

"We are seeing all these very visible, vacant, under-utilized buildings transforming," he said. "We welcome density, but I'm thrilled to see developers want to preserve the character everyone loves about this area."

 

'Unique vibe'

The East Village developers said they are looking for businesses, shops and restaurants that have a "grittiness" and "unique vibe." They hope their project will set a tone for the developing area.

 

"We are excited that we are in the shadow of downtown, a place that is uniquely Houston," Sperandio said.

 

One of the debut tenants will be a micro-distillery, Our/Houston, that will open in 4,200 square feet in the former Kitchen Depot space at 2118 Lamar. It's led by Omar Afra, publisher of Free Press Houston, and public relations official Dutch Small.

 

"It's going to be made right here in Houston, right off of St. Emanuel. This is not one of those vodkas that comes in on an aircraft carrier that's distributed to a dozen people who put a sticker on it," Afra said. "It will use local ingredients to create the distillate."

 

Afra said that by fall, the space also will be ready for use as event space for charity events, public receptions and private parties.

 

"The great thing about it is, this isn't going to be a ticketed venue," Afra said. "This is going to be a place where you can say: 'Hey, I'm in this burgeoning neighborhood with a brewery down the road. I can hop in here and see a great art show by a local artist or a great art show from Amsterdam that we brought in via our partners in Amsterdam.' "

 

The two are working with French spirits powerhouse Pernod Ricard and with Åsa Caap of Sweden-based Great Works to launch the distillery.

 

 

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This will be a great addition to the neighborhood. Its the kind of project I hope will continue to happen. There are many wonderful industrial buildings both brick , lathe and plaster, and metal that will lend themselves to creating the kind of vibe that is so now.

Hutchens street has quite a few new bars and businesses going in. I just hope that the townhouse developers don't come in before the creative youth and tear down this wonderful stock of buildings that have so much potential for this type of growth.

I commend these guys for having the vision and understanding which needs to continue. It reminds me of the growth in East 6th street in Austin.

Which brings up something I've often contemplated. It seems like all Texas cities major growth is to the West, or north.

Dallas, Houston,  San Antonio, Austin. Is this a product of our culture to go west young man or is it just a coincidence? 

 

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I like brewery tours, but distillery tours are much more fun.

 

Aren't there more distilleries in the Houston area? Our/Houston vodka isn't the only distilled in Houston. There's BJ's Hookers for one but they and other Houston vodkas didn't get this kind of fanfare. I would take a gander that it's who you know being Omar and Dutch are well known in town.

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This will be a great addition to the neighborhood. Its the kind of project I hope will continue to happen. There are many wonderful industrial buildings both brick , lathe and plaster, and metal that will lend themselves to creating the kind of vibe that is so now.

Hutchens street has quite a few new bars and businesses going in. I just hope that the townhouse developers don't come in before the creative youth and tear down this wonderful stock of buildings that have so much potential for this type of growth.

I commend these guys for having the vision and understanding which needs to continue. It reminds me of the growth in East 6th street in Austin.

Which brings up something I've often contemplated. It seems like all Texas cities major growth is to the West, or north.

Dallas, Houston,  San Antonio, Austin. Is this a product of our culture to go west young man or is it just a coincidence? 

 

It's great but I'd like to see affordable housing with less strings attached in the mix in this area. People who have lived there for years will no longer be able to afford living there. I hate that's the price to gentrification.

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It's great but I'd like to see affordable housing with less strings attached in the mix in this area. People who have lived there for years will no longer be able to afford living there. I hate that's the price to gentrification.

Displacement isn't nice, but if they own the house/property won't they make a decent amount of money to then afford a nice house close by?

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It is unfortunate and I'm not sure that most of these people actually own their homes or are renters.

It happened in the Heights and Montrose and now its the near North, Third ward and the east end that are 

feeling the costs of gentrification. I was suggesting that the East end has the potential to have a bohemian feel 

and could possibly grow into a very nice village.

I'm a little confused though and forgive me because I'm not completely aware of the housing situation around the area I'm talking about but I thought that most of this area was light industrial and abandoned warehouses. I thought that most of the housing was more in the area of Navigation , Canal and Harrisburg to the north and much farther east of Live oak in the Polk ,Leeland, area to the south towards 45. The area I'm speaking of primarily hugs 59 to Live Oak and I didn't  think there were many homes in this area, except for all the new town homes that have been recently built. 

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 The area I'm speaking of primarily hugs 59 to Live Oak and I didn't  think there were many homes in this area, except for all the new town homes that have been recently built. 

 

You are correct

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It is unfortunate and I'm not sure that most of these people actually own their homes or are renters.

It happened in the Heights and Montrose and now its the near North, Third ward and the east end that are 

feeling the costs of gentrification. I was suggesting that the East end has the potential to have a bohemian feel 

and could possibly grow into a very nice village.

I'm a little confused though and forgive me because I'm not completely aware of the housing situation around the area I'm talking about but I thought that most of this area was light industrial and abandoned warehouses. I thought that most of the housing was more in the area of Navigation , Canal and Harrisburg to the north and much farther east of Live oak in the Polk ,Leeland, area to the south towards 45. The area I'm speaking of primarily hugs 59 to Live Oak and I didn't  think there were many homes in this area, except for all the new town homes that have been recently built. 

 

In the very near east end (the area eado), it was primarily warehouses, now a lot of it is townhomes. That's the area where East Village is being built. So in this specific instance, yeah, it's just growing a neighborhood in what was otherwise an industrial neighborhood.

 

Farther out though, the concerns above are for real. The area is changing. There's small pockets of hipster that have been here for a minute or two, there's bigger pockets of artists. small businesses are following. It's not a bad change, and hopefully it never becomes what montrose or the heights have become. I guess if it does, I can sell my house and buy another one closer to a bike path, cause I hate riding my bike in traffic. There are some signs of huge things to come. someone is building a single home on two lots, it's huge. Comically so. There have been other new constructions replacing empty lots and tear downs.

 

On the street I live only 1/4 of the houses are rentals, the rest are lived in by the owners. Maybe my street is the exception rather than the rule?  and if they're owners, they just need to keep up with the tax and insurance. if they're on a fixed income (retirement) the tax should stay the same as it was when they turned 65, so really we're just talking about the possibility of insurance costs going up and what they've always had to pay in upkeep. I'm unclear as to why they'd be priced out of the neighborhood. 

Edited by samagon
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Samagon, you're right, that house on two lots is enormous!  I'm guessing he plans to stick around the East End for a while, considering the style is also very specific to seemingly one person's tastes.  

 

If I were to sell and move, I'd still stay in the east end as well, just relocate a little closer to the light rail.

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How close is this to the proposed microunit highrise? Would be a plus for that development to have a nice mixture of mixed use space near it.

 

It's about 4 blocks away

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I'm sorry but four blocks is nothing. Go to New York and see how many blocks you walk to get to different things.

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so too far to walk. disappointing. 

 

joking!

 

Not sure if you're being sarcastic or not, but it's very easily walkable...I have walked to that area from my house about 6-7 blocks away....

 

EDIT:  Sorry Samagon -- didn't see your "joking" part !!

Edited by HoustonMidtown

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In the very near east end (the area eado), it was primarily warehouses, now a lot of it is townhomes. That's the area where East Village is being built. So in this specific instance, yeah, it's just growing a neighborhood in what was otherwise an industrial neighborhood.

 

Farther out though, the concerns above are for real. The area is changing. There's small pockets of hipster that have been here for a minute or two, there's bigger pockets of artists. small businesses are following. It's not a bad change, and hopefully it never becomes what montrose or the heights have become. I guess if it does, I can sell my house and buy another one closer to a bike path, cause I hate riding my bike in traffic. There are some signs of huge things to come. someone is building a single home on two lots, it's huge. Comically so. There have been other new constructions replacing empty lots and tear downs.

 

On the street I live only 1/4 of the houses are rentals, the rest are lived in by the owners. Maybe my street is the exception rather than the rule?  and if they're owners, they just need to keep up with the tax and insurance. if they're on a fixed income (retirement) the tax should stay the same as it was when they turned 65, so really we're just talking about the possibility of insurance costs going up and what they've always had to pay in upkeep. I'm unclear as to why they'd be priced out of the neighborhood. 

This was my concern. Not too far from the warehouse district, EaDo or whatever it'sbeing marketed as are homes that are either rented or have been owned by families for years. As property taxes rise, there's a real possibility that homeowners who have lived there for years won't be able to afford it. The East End has a rich history and I for one would hate to see it fall by the wayside like Freeman's Town in the Fourth Ward Montrose area.

 

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This was my concern. Not too far from the warehouse district, EaDo or whatever it'sbeing marketed as are homes that are either rented or have been owned by families for years. As property taxes rise, there's a real possibility that homeowners who have lived there for years won't be able to afford it. The East End has a rich history and I for one would hate to see it fall by the wayside like Freeman's Town in the Fourth Ward Montrose area.

 

 

Like as not, back before it was primarily Hispanic, there was a large and vibrant German and Italian population that lived in the east end (not to mention the eastern European Jewish community that thrived as well), no one lamented when they were forced out of the area due to suburbs having less crime and higher school quality.

 

Don't get me wrong, I love this neighborhood just the way it is. My house is less than 3 blocks from the home that my mother grew up in, and that my grandmother lived in from the late 1930s until 1995. So I have personal connection with the neighborhood that initially drew me to the area. Since moving here though I've found my neighbors are awesome, local restaurants that have been in the area for 30 or 40 years offer great food. The small shops and such are very nice too (as well as the constant garage sales).

 

It would suck to see the current state of the neighborhood change, but let's not kid ourselves, this neighborhood has history that encompasses more than the current state minus 50 years, and even when you include the people who left prior to the current state, it's no where near as historic as the loss of the freedmen's (not freeman's, but freedmen, as in literally, the area where the men and women newly freed from slavery chose to live) town.

 

Anyway, sorry for the rant-like post, but ultimately, if the homeowners are put in a position where they have to sell many of them will make out amazingly well. The home my mom grew up in, was sold for about $30,000 back in the late 90s. So the owners stand to make an exceedingly tidy profit.

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An interesting note from a blurb in The Leader that hinted at the vodka distillery, Our/Vodka (Our/Houston Vodka or Our Houston Vodka) opening in EaDo back in December:
 

 

Keane, who also did the lease for Johnny’s Gold Brick next door, said that the space at 2522 Yale couldn’t be a restaurant or a bar because there’s not enough parking. He thinks a retail concept with limiting parking would be more appropriate.
 

“The parking codes have changed,” he said. “You have to have 10 spots for every 1,000 square feet.”
 

He said that Absolut Vodka looked at the space to open a distillery but the cost of renovations was too high and they chose to move to east of Downtown. A custom car shop has also expressed interest.

 

Absolut Vodka is part of the Pernod Ricard portfolio and so is Our/Vodka. Omar, Free Press Houston and Dutch have done lots of work with Absolut over the last two years, most recently throwing an Absolut Houston vodka launch party last summer. I think the distillery is cool, although there are a few Houston-based distilleries in the city producing vodka,but having a major corportate owned distillery in the Heights would have taken away from what that area is about: local and small businesses.

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We know distillery Our/Houston (Our Houston Vodka, Our/Vodka) and Three Square Design Group are opening at what appears to EaDo's premiere venue. Here's another upcoming tenant to Ancorian's East Village: gastropub Chapman & Kirby, which will be an anchor for the mixed-use devolopment in East Downtown at t 2118 Lamar St (in the former Kitchen Depot in Old Chinatown).


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The gastropub is named after the middle names of Houston founders,The Allen Brothers. A lease was finalized in January under the entity Eado Enterprises Group LLC and is expected to open September 2016.

Chapman & Kirby is a project from two Hughes Hangar's original owners Steven Bien Tran and Hoang Cao (conceptulized and opened Hughes Hangar, The De Gaulle and event center The Astorian on Summer Street). Mazen Baltagi (Saint Dane’s but took over and revitalized Christian's Tailgate, Rich's, EscoBar and Mi Luna) is also a part of the gastropub.


Here's more about Chapman & Kirby:

Chapman & Kirby will be a gastrolounge concept and premium event space located in East Downtown Houston. The business is named after the founders of Houston (brothers Augustus Chapman Allen and John Kirby Allen) and its design, menu and concept draw inspiration from the city’s rich history of growth, struggle and resilience. Chapman & Kirby’s management team comprises four accomplished entrepreneurs with over 40 years of combined experience in owning, operating and leading food & beverage development for high-profile restaurants, bars and event venues located throughout Greater Houston. These businesses include Rich's, EscoBar, Mi Luna, Saint Dane’s, Christian’s Tailgate, Hughes Hangar and The Astorian.

 

Chapman & Kirby will be an anchor tenant in a new 60,000 square foot mixed-use project called East Village in Houston’s edgy East Downtown. East Village will transform 2 blocks of East Downtown into a pedestrian-friendly urban office and entertainment mecca.
 

With over 9,000 square feet of space (including a 1,000 square foot outdoor terrace), Chapman & Kirby is designed to transition seamlessly from a daily lunch and dinner spot to a festive evening and weekend destination. It will also serve as a high-end venue for corporate and private events.

 

 

More about the restaurant component of Chapman & Kirby:
 

Chapman & Kirby will be open for lunch and dinner seven days a week, and the bar will be open all week into the evenings to provide an upscale, relaxing experience for its patrons. Conveniently located in East Downtown, Chapman & Kirby will be able to serve the downtown business crowds as well as the increasing residential community in East Downtown. The goal is to provide a diverse array of customers with a beautifully designed space for meetings and getaways at all times of the day.
 

On Friday and Saturday evenings, the venue will be flipped into a chic lounge to host Houston’s nightlife scene. Various Midtown bars and nightlife venues that are currently popular in Houston are less than two miles away, and the Chapman team believes that Chapman & Kirby can anchor a growing movement towards East Downtown.
 

The space at Chapman & Kirby will also be designed to host private social events and corporate gatherings. The Chapman team's experience in developing and managing private event spaces like Hughes Hangar and The Astorian informs its ability to leverage the design and flow of Chapman & Kirby’s physical space to best serve this growing market.
 

Houston recently surpassed New York City as the most diverse city in America, with more nations and ethnicities represented than in any other city in the country. The Chapman & Kirby food and beverage menu will celebrate the cultural depth and heritage of Houston, while also striving for a wholesome, close-to-farm concept.
 

Here is a sampling of what will come to your table:

  • Lobster tamale, steamed and served with salsa swissa
  • Pork belly chicharone, seasoned with Tajin and served with salsa verde
  • "Wow Bao," a steamed hand-held dumpling stuffed with pulled Peking duck
  • Bell & Evans organic chicken tikka masala
  • Pizzette flat bread with chicken and shrimp pad thai
  • Pho noodle soup with shaved ribeye steak

There's a video explaning the concept featuring the owners and partner, with proposed renderings on NextSeed (the privacy setting prevents the video from being linked and shared). Eado Enterprises Group LLC is seeking to raise funds to complete the project via NextSeed.

 

 

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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Nearby Māk Studio in EaDo designed Chapman & Kirby. Here are renderings of gastropub Chapman & Kirby at 2118 Lamar St, one of the tenants in Ancorian's upcoming mixed-use development, East Village in Houston's East End / East Downtown (EaDo):



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Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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Info on other tenants opening in the Ancorian East Village in Houston's EaDo in addition to Our Vodka (Our/Vodka Our/Houston Our Houston vodka), Three Square Design and gastropub Chapman & Kirby:

East Village will contain several other food & beverage options, as well as office space and some non-traditional hospitality offerings. Pernod Ricard’s Our Vodka subsidiary has announced plans for a micro-distillery and tasting bar in East Village, and the wildly successful Truck Yard, a beer garden concept from Dallas plans to open a 3,000 square foot indoor restaurant and bar with a 15,000 square foot patio in East Village. Houston’s Three Square Design is scheduled to take 10,000 square feet of office space over 20,000 square feet of retail space in the first phase of the project as well.


Very exciting pieces coming together for the development. I haven't been to the food truck park on St Emanuel but if Truck Yard opens, it will kill that food truck park's EaDo and Downtown location.Truck Yard hosts food trucks and serves beer, cocktais and food. I would like to know more about the AirnB component.

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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It's going to be a micro distillery from spirits giant Pernod Ricard, city-branded Our/Vodka (Our/Houston, Our Houston vodka) in the nex mixed-use development East Village. More info here:

http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/33040-east-village-at-1201-st-emanuel/#entry522046

and here:

http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/33040-east-village-at-1201-st-emanuel/#entry522063

and here:

http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/33040-east-village-at-1201-st-emanuel/#entry522071

and here:

http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/33040-east-village-at-1201-st-emanuel/#entry522167

and here:

http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/33040-east-village-at-1201-st-emanuel/page-2#entry522584

 

 

 

As for the restaurant/kitchen depot, it's going to be apart of the new East Village development too. It will be a gastropub. More info here:

http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/33040-east-village-at-1201-st-emanuel/page-2#entry523079

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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More on the gastropub Chapman & Kirby at 2118 Lamar originally posted here and here:


From Houston Chronicle:
 

 

 Gastropub the latest tenant signed on at East Village


A group has signed a lease hoping to bring a gastropub restaurant to a renovated mixed-use project in East Downtown.
 

East Village, by Houston's Ancorian, will house a vodka distillery and an architecture firm on the east side of U.S. 59, across from downtown Houston. A full story about the 60,000-square-foot project is here on HoustonChronicle.com.
 

The Chapman & Kirby would take up 3,000-square-foot indoor restaurant and bar space and a 15,000-square-foot patio in the project at 2118 Lamar Street, in the place of the former Kitchen Depot. 
 

The name for the gastropub comes from the middle names of the Allen brothers, who founded Houston. A lease was finalized this month under the entity EaDo Enterprises Group. It's expected to open this fall. 
 

The concept will be launched by Hughes Hangar original owners Steven Bien Tran and Hoang Cao and Mazen Baltagi, who runs Christian's Tailgate, Rich's, EscoBar and Mi Luna.



 

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judging by the way those ghostly apparitions are dressed, this place is way above my salary band to get in, but I'm excited for the area and east end in general.

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So this is already underway or all talk?

 

It's underway. Most of the spaces for this development have been leased. Construction will possibly start in this quarter or next. I saw a Craiglist for a building in this property a week ago almost giving away scrap pieces because it's closing.

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The best renovations are the ones where you get to knock down walls with a bobcat

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