Jump to content

The Driscoll + Four Additional High-Rises Coming To River Oaks Shopping Center


sachouston

Recommended Posts

  • 1 month later...
  • 1 year later...

An update from the GHPA -

River Oaks Shopping Center changes compromise Art Deco design

Weingarten Realty Investors is installing corner turrets, taller parapets, sandstone elements and larger signs on the historic River Oaks Shopping Center (1937, 1948) on West Gray at South Shepherd. The alterations, pictured above, are changing the profile of the Art Deco landmark and compromising its low, streamlined design. The work is being carried out on all of the historic buildings in the center except the River Oaks Theater (1939).

In 2007, Weingarten Realty demolished one of the distinctive curved sections of the original shopping center. The extended height, new signs and, particularly, the sandstone detailing are in keeping with the appearance of the new Barnes & Noble wing built on the site of the demolished historic building.

River Oaks Shopping Center is a designated City of Houston historic landmark. Houston Archaeological and Historical Commission denied a Certificate of Appropriateness for this project, but Houston’s historic preservation ordinance allowed the City to issue permits for the work after a 90-day waiting period.

Amendments to the preservation ordinance eliminated the 90-day waiver in designated City of Houston historic districts. Individually designated landmarks that are not in historic districts can still be altered or demolished after 90 days. River Oaks Shopping Center is not located in a City of Houston historic district.

Click here to see photos of the River Oaks Shopping Center before the alterations.

post-939-0-59120100-1303940137_thumb.jpe

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a question, is the River Oaks Theater in those thumbnails recently posted? Or does it still kind of sit by itself...somewhat, awaiting an uncertain fate?

I haven't visited that area in a while. I run across the postcards of the original River Oaks Shopping Center streamlined design quite often.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

phttp://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2015/12/15/river-oaks-shopping-center-might-add-residential.html

 

Quote
Houston-based Weingarten Realty Investors (NYSE: WRI) is considering adding mixed-use components to its existing River Oaks Shopping Center.

 

Some of the options Weingarten is considering include a residential component, additional retail and structured parking, as well as improved pedestrian walkability and enhanced public spaces. However, the company said the plans are still very preliminary.

 

“If an option evaluated is feasible and a definitive plan is approved, we will make an official announcement,” Gerald Crump, senior vice president of leasing for Weingarten Realty, said in a statement.

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back when plans for redeveloping the River Oaks Shopping Center were first mooted (leading to the Barnes & Noble building) there was a diagram floating around that showed a residential development where the River Oaks Theater is.  I wonder if that is still what they have in mind.  

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back when plans for redeveloping the River Oaks Shopping Center were first mooted (leading to the Barnes & Noble building) there was a diagram floating around that showed a residential development where the River Oaks Theater is.  I wonder if that is still what they have in mind.  

The article says this component would be on the North side of W. Gray where Sur La Table, Local Pour and  Brasserie 19 currently are.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/columnists/sarnoff/article/Weingarten-River-Oaks-Shopping-Center-plans-6705313.php#photo-9126069

 

On Tuesday, the company said it is planning more changes. This time Weingarten officials are focused on the north side of the property along West Gray between McDuffie and Driscoll streets. The changes could include adding residential units, more retail space and parking.

 

"We've started engaging architects, and we're talking to various vendors," senior vice president of leasing Gerald Crump said in a phone interview. "We've had some tenant conversations over the last several weeks of what we could potentially do out here."

 

The company called the new plan "very preliminary."

 

n 2007, Weingarten demolished the building on the center's northwest corner to make way for a bigger structure, which is now anchored by Barnes & Noble. The company also added a multistory parking garage in the back.

The new development was one that drew the ire of historic preservation groups that already had concerns about losing their beloved River Oaks Theatre.

If Weingarten intends to demolish any parts of the center, it will have to notify the city's Houston Archaeological and Historical Commission because the property is designated as a historic landmark.

But even if the commission disapproves of the plans, Weingarten could still move forward after a 90-day waiting period, said David Bush, acting executive director of Preservation Houston.

Crump said Weingarten does not take the community's concerns lightly and would communicate its plans to residents as it gets closer to finalizing its plans.

Based on a preliminary timetable, the new development could be completed as early as 2019.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Weingarten Expands River Oaks Center Footprint with Acquisition 

 

Weingarten Realty has made a property acquisition in the River Oaks area that will allow it to expand its redevelopment plans for its iconic River Oaks Shopping Center.

 

The Houston-based real estate investment trust purchased the Pier One store at 1935 West Gray.

 

"The property will be part of the future redevelopment of the River Oaks shopping center," according to a company statement released Tuesday with information on fourth-quarter transactions.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

 

Drew tells us everything is on the table. The company is considering a residential component, office space, parking options and landscaping improvements (don’t worry, removing there are no plans to remove the palm trees).  The residential component would probably see more empty nesters than Millennials, considering the area, Drew says.

Weingarten is always looking for ways to modernize the iconic shopping center, Drew says, even when those improvements whip up controversy. The company's exploring ways to connect the north and south sides of the complex. They’ve considered an elevated crosswalk, but that idea never got off the ground—literally. The distance across the road is too short; the span would be too steep to walk comfortably. An underground tunnel would likewise have a number of obstacles. Discussions continue.
 

Kroger is being remodeled, no surprise since Drew says supermarkets are a bright spot in Houston's Goldilocks economy: OK, but not great. Weingarten’s grocers average an outstanding $602/SF in sales, Drew tells us.

Read more at: https://www.bisnow.com/houston/news/retail/drew-alexander-dishes-on-river-oaks-shopping-center-and-the-end-of-the-universe-57600?utm_source=CopyShare&utm_medium=Browser

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 months later...

More properties acquired  for redevelopment 

 

http://m.chron.com/business/real-estate/article/Weingarten-announces-Q4-earnings-and-River-Oaks-10949152.php

 

Weingarten Realty Investors said Tuesday that it purchased two free-standing buildings next to its River Oaks Shopping Center "that will facilitate planned future redevelopment."



 

The buildings were mentioned in the company's fourth-quarter earnings release, where Weingarten reported quarterly net income of $44.1 million, or 34 cents per share, down from $47.3 million, or 38 cents per share, for the same period in 2015.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Weingarten is always looking for ways to modernize the iconic shopping center, Drew says, even when those improvements whip up controversy. The company's exploring ways to connect the north and south sides of the complex. They’ve considered an elevated crosswalk, but that idea never got off the ground—literally. The distance across the road is too short; the span would be too steep to walk comfortably. An underground tunnel would likewise have a number of obstacles. Discussions continue.

 

I know I must be looking straight at it, but for some reason it escapes me... Can someone tell me why people can't just walk across the street there?

 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

 

 

I know I must be looking straight at it, but for some reason it escapes me... Can someone tell me why people can't just walk across the street there?

 

Lol! Since the redevelopment would likely include a second story, they could just... you know, span the two. Likely where there are to be stairs and elevators in place already?

 

People cross Westheimer in Highland Village all the time. All ages, all incomes, all times of day.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kroger is the only place I frequent in that area, and I normally ride my bike down Clay to Woodhead to get there. Too many parking lot entrances and cars darting all over the place. I actually had to go to JosABank and Kroger this last weekend and walked in between. Just a few stores and a parking lot apart. I almost got run over several times and watched people valet for Sunday brunch when they could have parked 50' away. Between the size of the parking lots, number of entrances, fast left turners coming off Gray, and the unfortunate nature of all the people around, not many people walk in that center. I think it will take more then an elevated crosswalk to change the way people move around the whole center.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

skwatra is right. I've seen people drive from the North side to the South side just to shop. Seriously. When I lived on Elmen I used to walk to the River Oaks Theater but that was in the 90s and there was also a theater at West Gray @ Waugh. Saw Mars Attacks there after a bowl. Never laughed so hard in my life. 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Mab said:

 

There will be one less of those turrets, which is a win.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, KinkaidAlum said:

skwatra is right. I've seen people drive from the North side to the South side just to shop. Seriously. When I lived on Elmen I used to walk to the River Oaks Theater but that was in the 90s and there was also a theater at West Gray @ Waugh. Saw Mars Attacks there after a bowl. Never laughed so hard in my life. 

A bowl of cereal? Lol 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

except no one walks around there! I'm telling you people drive from one store to another within the same parking lot.

The people that live in the neighborhood do. I walk to Kroger, Buffalo Bayou Park, River Oaks Theatre all the time and I see my neighbors out walking quite often.

Edited by jgriff
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/21/2017 at 8:56 PM, H-Town Man said:

 

 

 

I know I must be looking straight at it, but for some reason it escapes me... Can someone tell me why people can't just walk across the street there?

 

 

Perhaps they could install Gondolas, they're pretty popular right now.

 

17 hours ago, KinkaidAlum said:

skwatra is right. I've seen people drive from the North side to the South side just to shop. Seriously. When I lived on Elmen I used to walk to the River Oaks Theater but that was in the 90s and there was also a theater at West Gray @ Waugh. Saw Mars Attacks there after a bowl. Never laughed so hard in my life. 

 

Seriously though, why is W. Gray 4 lanes there? Why wouldn't they drop it to 1 lane each direction, and a suicide turn lane (or median with turn lanes)? At Waugh, they should get rid of the extra lane on both sides and slow it down to encourage pedestrians and discourage people using it as a through street.

 

I watched Mars Attacks at the theater that used to be at BW8 and I10, I didn't have a bowl previous to seeing it, but still laughed quite hard.

 

as far as why people drive across the street, they probably assume it's not one shopping experience, and if they leave their car on one side to go shopping on the other side they'll get towed.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Parking is a major part of it. I know at many of the areas the parking is strictly for the 1-5 business in that area. If you walk across, in theory you can get towed. That would have to be changed. For instance, the parking at Mens Warehouse is for their customers only. If you want to go to The Gap down the street, you will have to move your car. The parking at Kroger says for Kroger customers only. The same is for the parking garage at the corner by Barnes and Noble. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, samagon said:

 

Perhaps they could install Gondolas, they're pretty popular right now.

 

 

Seriously though, why is W. Gray 4 lanes there? Why wouldn't they drop it to 1 lane each direction, and a suicide turn lane (or median with turn lanes)? At Waugh, they should get rid of the extra lane on both sides and slow it down to encourage pedestrians and discourage people using it as a through street.

 

I watched Mars Attacks at the theater that used to be at BW8 and I10, I didn't have a bowl previous to seeing it, but still laughed quite hard.

 

as far as why people drive across the street, they probably assume it's not one shopping experience, and if they leave their car on one side to go shopping on the other side they'll get towed.

 

Houston seems to love 4 lane streets even when there could be a better configuration with less travel lanes

Take Westheimer for example - lower Westheimer could work better as a 2 lane street with parking on both sides and left turn lanes at the lights, since that is what people treat it as now anyway

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cspwal said:

 

Houston seems to love 4 lane streets even when there could be a better configuration with less travel lanes

Take Westheimer for example - lower Westheimer could work better as a 2 lane street with parking on both sides and left turn lanes at the lights, since that is what people treat it as now anyway

i disagree that would work better.  such an arrangement would be similar to Westheimer near Woodhead, and on the weekends in nice weather, the stretch to the east of that intersection is to be avoided at all costs.  i don't see any traffic issues on west gray or lower Westheimer at this time.  let's not create them.   and putting the towing issue aside (which should be fixed), how hard is it for people to walk 30 feet to the stoplight and cross like they do in every other city.  

Edited by htownproud
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, thatguysly said:

Parking is a major part of it. I know at many of the areas the parking is strictly for the 1-5 business in that area. If you walk across, in theory you can get towed. That would have to be changed. For instance, the parking at Mens Warehouse is for their customers only. If you want to go to The Gap down the street, you will have to move your car. The parking at Kroger says for Kroger customers only. The same is for the parking garage at the corner by Barnes and Noble. 

 

If Weingarten restricts (or lets tenants restrict) their parking so that you can't shop at more than one store, then they're as dumb as I thought.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

If Weingarten restricts (or lets tenants restrict) their parking so that you can't shop at more than one store, then they're as dumb as I thought.

 

The Village parking is similar in some areas as well.  Unfortunately, restricted parking like this is fairly common phenomenon in our "strip mall" centric city.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's literally a 6 story free garage that's is literally a 3 min walk max from any store in the entire complex. Is reserving 3-5 spots for big anchors really a dumb idea considering most people go there for a specific store? Someone going to Brasserie 19 is most likely not going to Gap or the gym equipment store under Americas. So many people here like to call big developers dumb but don't exactly seem to be successful developers. Market forces don't always match our ideals :)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Highrise Tower changed the title to River Oaks Shopping Center Developments
  • Urbannizer changed the title to The Driscoll + Four Additional High-Rises Coming to River Oaks Shopping Center

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...