Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Sparrow

Holiday Inn Express North Main

Recommended Posts

Holiday Inn Express to go in at North Main and I-45--on next planning commission agenda. Not likely to be anything spectacular, but with the small footprint of less than an acre and a half, should be of some interest. SWC Norma and North Main. Grota Street officially abandoned by COH last month.

 

85 rooms. 6 floors.

 

Edited by Sparrow
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holiday Inn Express to go in at North Main and I-45--on next planning commission agenda. Not likely to be anything spectacular, but with the small footprint of less than an acre and a half, should be of some interest. SWC Norma and North Main. Grota Street officially abandoned by COH last month.

 

85 rooms. 6 floors.

 

Were those numbers in the planning commission?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Elevation and site plan are on the current planning commission agenda pdf if anyone is able to grab those and post. Nothing impressive. Fairly depressing actually. But hey, it's progress I suppose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CTZnw46UsAATTif.png

 

As I look at this I can't help but think how very poorly the building placement in the middle of the lot results in wasted space--look at all of that driveway encircling the entire building. Just eyeballing it without actually doing up a schematic, better building placement should result in additional parking spaces by reducing the wasted driveway acreage. I'm sure it's just the visual perception I'm getting, no doubt they did their due diligence, but it just seems like a poor choice. Building setbacks no doubt play a part, but that's what they're seeking a variance for anyhow I believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending on where your building is placed relative to roads, you might need to have fire lane access around your building. This is generally why so many non-urban properties are built like this.

 

As I look at this I can't help but think how very poorly the building placement in the middle of the lot results in wasted space--look at all of that driveway encircling the entire building. Just eyeballing it without actually doing up a schematic, better building placement should result in additional parking spaces by reducing the wasted driveway acreage. I'm sure it's just the visual perception I'm getting, no doubt they did their due diligence, but it just seems like a poor choice. Building setbacks no doubt play a part, but that's what they're seeking a variance for anyhow I believe.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The hotel just a couple of blocks from WOMH is starting construction now:

 

 

 

 

 

 

holidayinn2.png

holidayinn.png

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:


But this isn't part of the White Oak Music Hall development, right?

Yes, I didn't realize we already had a hotel thread. I'll merge it over there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So construction has started but I'm not confident this is a Holiday Inn Express anymore. The layout of the foundation doesn't match the schematics. Anyone think this became something else? I'll take some photos this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/8/2018 at 11:42 PM, Triton said:

So construction has started but I'm not confident this is a Holiday Inn Express anymore. The layout of the foundation doesn't match the schematics. Anyone think this became something else? I'll take some photos this weekend.

 

45271764705_62de065484_h.jpg

3401 N Main Holiday Inn Express by Marc longoria, on Flickr

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the former site of Mexican restaurant Casa Grande, and farther back it was Stuart's Drive-In. http://swamplot.com/casa-grande-on-n-main-st-isnt-just-closed-its-bank-closed/2015-03-20/

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True that. It looks like a completely normal, clean, and safe motel that normal people who are traveling away from home might actually spend the night in.

 

The other places in the area look sketchy, like hooker/drug hangouts.

Edited by zaphod
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now on the HAIF Development Map under the layer "Under Construction". For any updates on the status of this project. Please DM me.

Things to keep an eye on include (but not limited to):

-updated renders (will be adding pics to all projects later)
-project name changes

-changes in use or additions of uses

-changes in number of stories

-changes to Developer or additional Developers

-changes to Architect or additional Architects/Designers

-announcements or changes to construction dates / finish dates



If any of the above is missing in the project info already then please assist clarifying any missing info to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Luminare said:

Now on the HAIF Development Map under the layer "Under Construction". For any updates on the status of this project. Please DM me.

Things to keep an eye on include (but not limited to):

-updated renders (will be adding pics to all projects later)
-project name changes

-changes in use or additions of uses

-changes in number of stories

-changes to Developer or additional Developers

-changes to Architect or additional Architects/Designers

-announcements or changes to construction dates / finish dates



If any of the above is missing in the project info already then please assist clarifying any missing info to me.

Do you have a link to this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Triton said:

Do you have a link to this?

Oh nevermind. I didn't realize you just meant the Google Maps sheet. Ok cool!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With this hotel and the new Courtyard Houston Heights (see link below ... I think a nice looking building ... is there a thread on this project?), I’m wondering what is taking Midtown so long to get a midtier hotel, advertising proximity to downtown, the Med Ctr, Museum District, and Montrose.

 

Seems like a couple of these would work well in EaDo too.

 

https://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/houcw-courtyard-houston-heights-i-10/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, mattyt36 said:

With this hotel and the new Courtyard Houston Heights (see link below ... I think a nice looking building ... is there a thread on this project?), I’m wondering what is taking Midtown so long to get a midtier hotel, advertising proximity to downtown, the Med Ctr, Museum District, and Montrose.

 

Seems like a couple of these would work well in EaDo too.

 

https://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/houcw-courtyard-houston-heights-i-10/

 

The hotel guys can’t compete with the multi family guys on land pricing in midtown. It’s possible you might see some tighter sites being taken on by hotel guys once the parking requirements go away. 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, HNathoo said:

 

The hotel guys can’t compete with the multi family guys on land pricing in midtown. It’s possible you might see some tighter sites being taken on by hotel guys once the parking requirements go away. 

 

 

 

Agree. Until that requirement goes away, we will only get the super large ones in town, or tiny ones that reuse old buildings. Parking is such a drag in terms of costs especially when turn over is the whole point of a hotel, and you just don't know if you are going to get full occupancy or very few depending on the months. Parking is already deadspace, but even more so for hotels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, jmitch94 said:

It will be interesting to see what caused this. 

 

Project will most likely be on hold indefinitely till they figure this out. Normally the order of investigation goes like this; first test the whole building, then the architect, then the engineers, then the GC, and finally the subs.

If the other floors check out, then the check the drawings with the architect.

 

If that checks out then they approach the engineer to check specs on loads and field tests required.

 

If that checks out then they approach the gc to see if he mandated the tests required, and procedures were done correctly regarding moving up floors.

 

If that checks out then they approach the subs to see if they poured and cured everything correctly.

 

Don't know how long it will take, but it is a smaller job, but we will see.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Triton said:

@Purdueenginerd Any thoughts?

 

 

Holiday_Inn_collapse.PNG

 

You just gave me a heart attack. I have a light gage building of similar height and construction that's topping out soonish. 

 

Quote

Upon initial review of the incident, the inspector believes the shoring was "inadequate," Erin Jones, a spokesperson with Houston Public Works, said. That means whatever temporary support system was in place while workers poured the concrete may not have been working properly and resulted in the collapse.

 

 

Let me just say, from the imagery I can see -- theres not a lot I can discern. But I will comment on the quote above, which involves shoring. Typically (though not always) steel decking can support a live load (ie, people), but can't support the wet, uncured concrete weight (dead load) without additional shoring. Typically for this style construction, the shoring is designed by a subconsultant that the contractor hires. Once the concrete cures then it effectively "adds" strength, or can self support without the shoring. The shoring is subsequently removed and construction proceeds. Getting into the weeds here, but this is the load tables both the contractor and their subs would have access to http://vulcraft.com/catalogs/412 (PDF warning) and if you go down to the load tables. You'll see every single deck has a table of its capacity... followed by another table of its "Maximum Construction Clear spans". For Example go to page 30, you'll see in some of those configurations, the deck can only span 5-6 feet before needing shoring (during construction). Obviously, I dont have their span tables or deck drawings so I cant comment on if their shoring was sufficient.. however looking at the photos. I dont see shoring on the level below the collapse. Thats not unheard of, but not that common. Generally you want to shore 2-3 levels. I also dont see shoring on the area to the right, though its not clear if that area was to receive concrete decking. Was the contractor dumb enough not to install shoring? -- I'd be genuinely surprised if that was the case... but contractors have surprised me in the past. Maybe more likely is that the shoring got bumped out of place (or improperly installed) which lead to collapse during concrete placement. 

 

 

 

Edited by Purdueenginerd
slight clarification.
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Additional comment: I went back and looked at a few photos from earlier in construction. I'm not totally convinced shoring is the issue here. Im still at my office, so when I go home, I'll get into my blind speculation. 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Luminare said:

 

Project will most likely be on hold indefinitely till they figure this out. Normally the order of investigation goes like this; first test the whole building, then the architect, then the engineers, then the GC, and finally the subs.

 

My experience is that everybody gets involved in trying to sort out the how and why pretty much immediately. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, mollusk said:

 

My experience is that everybody gets involved in trying to sort out the how and why pretty much immediately. 

 

Agreed. What I described is more along the line of where does blame go first if their were a hierarchy for such things. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Purdueenginerd said:

rhhXOZ5.png

 

 

Fair Warning: I dont know what happened, but the reason I dont necessarily think its shoring is because of the joist spacing. The joist spacing, shown above is about 18-24". Which would be more than enough to prevent steel deck failure associated with a lack of shoring. The roof joists are spanning about 30-40' (based off google earth) which isnt too unusual. During construction, the joists could be weaker for lateral torsional buckling, if their bottom and top flange are insufficiently braced.

 

Other baseless speculation: If a joist was poorly connected, improperly connected, or designed poorly,  it could facilitate a cascading failure.  Lets imagine for a moment joist spacing is 24".  And we have 4" of concrete. 4"/12"*1ft*150pcf. =50 lbs/ft^2 ( or PSF) of weight. The construction live load should and could be 50 PSF. Keep note of the construction live load, thats important. The total load theoretically would 100 PSF (plus self weight). On a single joist it would 100 PSF * 2 feet (or 24") = 200 lbs/ft(or PLF). Which means the load bearing wall at each joist is supporting 200 PLF* 30ft/2 =3000 lbs. Now, Imagine one of the joists and its respective connections to the load bearing wall failed. The next joist over, immediately picks up the load.  So now the single 100 PSF * 3ft =300 lbs/ft. - a 50 percent increase in load on the next two joists over. Why did I bring up the Construction Live load?  Because the roof is traditionally designed for a live load of 20 psf.   -- This isnt a code discrepancy, Its just something a lot of contractors dont know about. So its plausible, that contractor may have inadvertently overloaded a connection, a single or multiple joists or some combination thereof. This could have precipitated the cascade. 

 

 Structural steel Column Failure: Not Likely.

 

Load bearing wall failure: Also not likely, but I have noticed that the studs are not currently braced for weak axis bending. Weak axis bending and strong axis bending are structural topics I wont get into unless you guys really want me to haha. Again, this isnt likely unless they used a much lighter gage steel at higher elevations (not unheard of). 

 

 

 

 

Now this is analysis we need more of! I talk about design stuff on various threads a bunch. Would not mind taking a step back to hear some about engineering. Though the equations immediately fly over my head, its great education nonetheless. This is also a building system I'm not familiar with yet. I know they use this system a lot for multifamily as well, but my only experience with steel has been web joists + steel columns. Not a forest of mtl stud acting as shear walls, and mtl stud being configured to act as beams.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Luminare said:

 

Now this is analysis we need more of! I talk about design stuff on various threads a bunch. Would not mind taking a step back to hear some about engineering. Though the equations immediately fly over my head, its great education nonetheless. This is also a building system I'm not familiar with yet. I know they use this system a lot for multifamily as well, but my only experience with steel has been web joists + steel columns. Not a forest of mtl stud acting as shear walls, and mtl stud being configured to act as beams.

 

Im not a super big fan of light gage. Its superior to wood framing and more uniform. But Owners sometimes dont realize there are load bearing walls in the structure. 

 

From an architectural standpoint the floor plans more or less have to be uniform. Which is great for a hotel/apartments. Its get problematic and expensive when the floor plans change from floor to floor. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Purdueenginerd said:

 

Im not a super big fan of light gage. Its superior to wood framing and more uniform. But Owners sometimes dont realize there are load bearing walls in the structure. 

 

From an architectural standpoint the floor plans more or less have to be uniform. Which is great for a hotel/apartments. Its get problematic and expensive when the floor plans change from floor to floor. 

I saw a lot of construction in the Middle East (had one temporary apartment that was next door to a high rise under construction and saw the construction about 50 feet away out the window), and they used concrete pillars for load bearing, then put in steel studs for room separation. That seems to be a lot more flexible, and stronger. Is there a major cost differential doing that as opposed to suing metal studs as load bearing elements? Houses there are built the same way, at least for the structure. Interior walls of those houses are generally concrete block.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Urbannizer said:

Still on hold after the collapse?

Yup, drive by it everyday. The only crews that have come out were to clear up the debris that was hanging over the edge of the building. Not much activity since then.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plaintiffs appear to have obtained a temporary restraining order to prevent any alteration to the structure. Defendants are complaining that it's not necessary, and costs them $500 per day in interest. One of the defendants has also argued that the suit is barred by the worker's compensation act. This should be interesting.

 

Case numbers 201952375- 7 and 201955986- 7 on the Harris County District Clerk's site.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Construction has started back up on the other side that was not affected by the collapse. I'll try to get a picture in. 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is very good news. I noticed it a couple of days ago, but was not completely sure whether work had resumed or I was deceiving myself. I was afraid this building site was bound to remain in limbo for years. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Happened to drive-by today (was not able to snap a photo). There is new scaffolding up on the S. side of the building, and they seemed to have started applying a layer of paint. 

Edited by southerncrj
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...