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United Airlines Terminal C and B


nativehoustonion

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United renewed there leases with the COH and will begin construction of the new North Terminal C.  This to make room for the new International Terminal  D.  Also redesign North Terminal B, construction will start May 11th.  United is also added more Latin America flights this summer.  Another flight to LIM, UIO and SAL.   

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United renewed there leases with the COH and will begin construction of the new North Terminal C.  This to make room for the new International Terminal  D.  Also redesign North Terminal B, construction will start May 11th.  United is also added more Latin America flights this summer.  Another flight to LIM, UIO and SAL.   

 

Oh... I wished they could add one more route to Europe...

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I would think that a non-stop IAH to Shanghai would be a big seller for them.

More international flights will be good!

Not really. Having the 2nd flight to PVG from LAX or SFO will have a higher chance. Profitability of China routes is not as high as you think, except from west coast. Delta had ATL PVG route twice in history but proved to be a loss. AA was aggressive in China market last year in their DFW hub, which also makes new Asia routes out of IAH less possible.

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The end of this year United will have 25 787-8 and 9s and will retired 2 747-400s.  And there are 60 more 787 on order and IAH will even get more International flights.  Now who says United is not committed to Houston the largest hub.  I love their new planes and they also have 25 737-900ERs and ERJ-175s coming this year.  I'm hoping they can move their headquarters back to Houston!  

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According to an article published in the Chron last week the HAS' main focus right now is adding more international flights to and from Africa. I was hopeful for Johannesburg. That's based on absolutely nothing except that excerpt.

 

I also posted this in the Terminal D thread. Here is the article:

 

March 24--Houston's thriving immigrant community and diverse economy will help the city's airports continue to expand despite an oil slump that may temper the boom in business travel, Houston Airport System Director Mario Diaz told business leaders Monday.

Delivering the annual State of the Airports address, Diaz said he remains confident the airport system's unprecedented growth over the last two years would continue, with Bush Intercontinental, Hobby and Ellington airports all poised for major changes.

"Houston is without a doubt the most diverse city in the nation, and the Houston Airport System has made that possible," Diaz told a crowd at the Royal Sonesta. "We will continue to connect Houston to the rest of the world."

Houston's airports set a record in 2014 with more than 53 million passengers passing through. Internationally, 9.8 million travelers went through Bush, double the rate in 2000. Last year alone, travel to Asia and Africa increased 55 percent, and travel to Europe increased 10 percent.

This is in large part thanks to a string of new international nonstop flights added at the airport, including six new markets last year.

Among the flights added are a nonstop Korean Air flight to the Seoul area, and Scandinavian Airlines nonstop to Stavanger, Norway.

"Right now, the city of Houston is within reach of a very unique and very powerful opportunity," Diaz said. "Houston is poised to become a key global gateway destination, with international passengers flowing through Houston on their way throughout the Americas and to various destinations in the U.S."

The airport has consistently touted Houston's powerful economy when attracting new carriers. Diaz said even with a tumble in oil prices, he expects to attract more flights. He noted the large number of immigrants in the Houston area, and the health of the medical, aerospace and petrochemical industries locally.

"People ask me, why is it so easy for me to find airlines?" Diaz said. "What they want to hear is how powerful is the economy, how many passengers can you generate, what quality passenger?"

He said a drop in oil prices could dampen demand for first class and business class travelers. But, he added, passengers looking to visit family in other countries could find lower prices for coach seats, thanks to added competition.

The next area he would like to add is nonstop flights is Africa, Diaz said.

International flights are expected to continue growing.

Hobby will open a $156 million, five-gate international terminal in October. Southwest Airlines, which is primarily funding the project, will add several flights to Latin America. The airport will have a 3,000-space parking garage to accommodate the1 million passengers expected to be added annually.

Bush will have a new Terminal D by 2020. The City Council approved the funding and phasing plan for the terminal project in June. Construction is slated to begin in 2017. Diaz said one hurdle to Houston's role as an international player is the aging terminal at Bush for international passengers.

The airport system also completed its Federal Aviation Administration application for Ellington to become a commercial spaceport.

Diaz also touted the free WiFi service now available at all terminals at Bush and Hobby, automated kiosks to expedite the process for international travelers, and the NextGen federal project that the airport adopted to improve on-time arrivals.

 

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Thanks I read the article and the pdf looks exciting.  I wish they can start Terminal D sooner.  Last time I landing at Bush Terminal D is so crowded.  I saw Air Chia 777 a Turkish Airline 777, and a Lufthansa parked away from the terminal.  There was also another Lufthansa 380 and a Emirates 380 parked at the terminal.  I was odd to see 2 Lufthansa 380s something must of happened maybe one was xxled the previous day.

 

A United employee told me yesterday they released the expansion on IAH Terminal and B and C and ground breaking is May11th through their company internet.          

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Where exactly is this going/what is it replacing? From the article it says the existing terminal C north would be demolished after this is complete, so I'm assuming it will go to the west of the current terminal C north. But is it actually replacing the banjos at terminal B, or is it going in between the two, near the hotel where B84 is? One would think if it was replacing the banjos it would be called the new terminal B north terminal but who knows.

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Ok per airliners.net it's going to occupy the space starting at C24 west to B84. So the banjos will survive unfortunately.

 

Yes, the banjos survive, for now.  But they have a pretty limited life expectancy.  Phase III of the Terminal B project will eliminate the remaining banjos.

 

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Found a diagram showing the plan. The part in green is the terminal C north renovation/new pier that broke ground today (previously was going to be phase 3 of terminal B north). Looks like the removal of the banjos and reconstruction of B north will occur after this and possibly after terminal D. This makes some sense, as B north will be able to connect to C when complete.

 

 

Edited by asubrt
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Found a diagram showing the plan. The part in green is the terminal C north renovation/new pier that broke ground today (previously was going to be phase 3 of terminal B north). Looks like the removal of the banjos and reconstruction of B north will occur after this and possibly after terminal D. This makes some sense, as B north will be able to connect to C when complete.

 

attachicon.gif1431382689QAYVJP.jpg

 

That diagram indeed shows the location of the new Terminal C North which they broke ground for yesterday.  But it's an old diagram and the details of the new concourse have changed a bit. (e.g. It will have some wide-body capabilities which I don't think was in the plan shown in this diagram).

 

This concourse was previously going to be phase II of the Terminal B project (not Phase 3).  Phase I was the south side concourses.  And it still is often referred to as Phase 2 of United's Terminal B program (it just ends up resulting in a new Terminal C North. It will also be connected to Terminal B.  

 

Yes, the removal of the north-side banjos is and always has been Phase III of the Terminal B program.  AFAIK, there is no set schedule for that phase.  It will certainly be after this new C north concourse is completed.  Phase III will be done when United decides they need additional capacity. I would be surprised if they start it before the new Terminal D is completed, but who knows?

 

1147019-Aerial.jpg

Edited by Houston19514
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I'm flying in to IAH tomorrow (Friday) and I noticed on flightaware this morning that the United ERJ-145's are utilizing terminal A, not B. What's up with that? I've never known United to use A. I was looking forward to seeing the new terminal B.

Edited by wxman
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United has been using Terminal A since the reconstruction of south Terminal B.  I have been flying Continental and United for 25 years.  Everybody hates the merger but know if it did not happened Continental would be in a lot of trouble.  Continental could not compete with American, Delta, and Southwest and the IAH hub would be gone.  They just need to get there s--- together.

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According to an article published in the Chron last week the HAS' main focus right now is adding more international flights to and from Africa. I was hopeful for Johannesburg. That's based on absolutely nothing except that excerpt.

I also posted this in the Terminal D thread. Here is the article:

March 24--Houston's thriving immigrant community and diverse economy will help the city's airports continue to expand despite an oil slump that may temper the boom in business travel, Houston Airport System Director Mario Diaz told business leaders Monday.

Delivering the annual State of the Airports address, Diaz said he remains confident the airport system's unprecedented growth over the last two years would continue, with Bush Intercontinental, Hobby and Ellington airports all poised for major changes.

"Houston is without a doubt the most diverse city in the nation, and the Houston Airport System has made that possible," Diaz told a crowd at the Royal Sonesta. "We will continue to connect Houston to the rest of the world."

Houston's airports set a record in 2014 with more than 53 million passengers passing through. Internationally, 9.8 million travelers went through Bush, double the rate in 2000. Last year alone, travel to Asia and Africa increased 55 percent, and travel to Europe increased 10 percent.

This is in large part thanks to a string of new international nonstop flights added at the airport, including six new markets last year.

Among the flights added are a nonstop Korean Air flight to the Seoul area, and Scandinavian Airlines nonstop to Stavanger, Norway.

"Right now, the city of Houston is within reach of a very unique and very powerful opportunity," Diaz said. "Houston is poised to become a key global gateway destination, with international passengers flowing through Houston on their way throughout the Americas and to various destinations in the U.S."

The airport has consistently touted Houston's powerful economy when attracting new carriers. Diaz said even with a tumble in oil prices, he expects to attract more flights. He noted the large number of immigrants in the Houston area, and the health of the medical, aerospace and petrochemical industries locally.

"People ask me, why is it so easy for me to find airlines?" Diaz said. "What they want to hear is how powerful is the economy, how many passengers can you generate, what quality passenger?"

He said a drop in oil prices could dampen demand for first class and business class travelers. But, he added, passengers looking to visit family in other countries could find lower prices for coach seats, thanks to added competition.

The next area he would like to add is nonstop flights is Africa, Diaz said.

International flights are expected to continue growing.

Hobby will open a $156 million, five-gate international terminal in October. Southwest Airlines, which is primarily funding the project, will add several flights to Latin America. The airport will have a 3,000-space parking garage to accommodate the1 million passengers expected to be added annually.

Bush will have a new Terminal D by 2020. The City Council approved the funding and phasing plan for the terminal project in June. Construction is slated to begin in 2017. Diaz said one hurdle to Houston's role as an international player is the aging terminal at Bush for international passengers.

The airport system also completed its Federal Aviation Administration application for Ellington to become a commercial spaceport.

Diaz also touted the free WiFi service now available at all terminals at Bush and Hobby, automated kiosks to expedite the process for international travelers, and the NextGen federal project that the airport adopted to improve on-time arrivals.

Joburg would be quite nice. Also wonder if we could get Etiopian to fly here with the Star Alliance connections. Maybe TAAG Angola if oil prices climb again.

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So I flew into Terminal B south for the first time today to which I was excited about. To be honest with you, it was very underwhelming. While the main B south terminal itself is very slick and modern, the welcome into the terminal via walking outside from the plane to the terminal gives credence to walking into a prison. I was very disappointed. It looks like they simply ran out of money to bring the slick, modern look to the jetways and left cinder block walls exposed instead. Is this really what some of the finest architects could come up with?! I have pics but for some reason it says the pic files are too large. I'll try to post them later tonight.

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It was built without jetways so the United Express flights can taxi quicker, and very few aircraft damages.  North Terminal C is looking good now it will have jetways for mainline aircrafts.  I hope they renovate Terminal B North, to crowded, people sitting on the floor and no restaurants like the new Terminal B south.   

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4 hours ago, nativehoustonion said:

Looks like the new Terminal C North for United may open early.  Looks like they are building the jetways.  

 

It appears to be moving along nicely.  But you should look more carefully.  Pretty sure they are not yet building jetways.  (And FWIW, when the time comes, they won't be "building" jetways; they will be "installing" jetways.)

 

1474573228215.jpg

Edited by Houston19514
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On 7/12/2016 at 0:49 PM, nativehoustonion said:

It was built without jetways so the United Express flights can taxi quicker, and very few aircraft damages.  North Terminal C is looking good now it will have jetways for mainline aircrafts.  I hope they renovate Terminal B North, to crowded, people sitting on the floor and no restaurants like the new Terminal B south.   

 

HAS in planning stages with United for 2 concourses to replace B North Banjos once Terminal C & D are done. An overhaul of Terminal A is also in planning stages. 

 

https://communityimpact.com/houston/lake-houston-humble-kingwood/development-construction/2016/10/06/iah-plans-4-billion-facelift/

 

Also, given the "within a year" timeframe, these local restaurants are probably slated for Terminal B & C. 

 

The new restaurants will open within a year and include Greater Houston area eateries, such as The Breakfast Klub, Hubcap Grill and Mexican restaurant Hugo’s, Simmons said.

Edited by tigereye
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1 hour ago, nativehoustonion said:

I think they will tear down Terminal D and use the old Terminal C north during construction.  Once that is complete then they will tear down old Terminal C to enlarge D.  They new Terminal C north is twice the size.    

 

You have it exactly backward.  Once the new Terminal C North is completed and occupied, the old Terminal C North will be demolished and replaced with the first portions of the new Terminal D. 

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3 hours ago, nativehoustonion said:

You are so cool.  I would like to meet you at the new Polaris Club.  I have no idea where it will be.  Most likely Terminal E somewhere? 

 

Get a room. :lol:

 

But yeah, I like the fact that everything seems to be running on schedule. I go to Sky Harbour in Phoenix periodically and it seems they have been doing construction there for 20 years and counting. They are always building, destroying or improving upon SOMEthing. It's a pain to navigate through.

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Eight new restaurants revealed for United's second phase at IAH

Chicago-based United Continental Holdings Inc. (NSYE: UAL) and New York-based OTG, which specializes in airport redesigns, have revealed eight restaurants that will open in the second phase of the ongoing renovation at George Bush Intercontinental Airport.



Additional projects will continue through 2021, as existing restaurant leases throughout the terminals expire, according to Rick Blatstein, OTG’s CEO. Altogether, the projects will cost $120 million when completed, Gavin Malloy, United’s vice president of corporate real estate, previously told the HBJ.

In addition to the eight new planned restaurants in Terminals C South and E, United and OTG will also renovate the holding areas for passengers waiting to board flights, Malloy said.

Agave

iah-tc-south-agave-view-1.jpg

iah-tc-south-agave-view-2.jpg

Agave from restaurateur Sharon Haynes, who started Taco A Go Go in Houston in 2006, is a casual taqueria that will focus on fajitas. Agave will be in terminal C South.

H-Burger

iah-tc-south-burger-bar-view-2.jpg

H-Burger, a burger bar with ranch-to-table offerings with a Houston twist, will be in Terminal C South. H-Burger is from Houston Chef Antoine Ware, the chef behind Harold's Heights.

CIBO Express

iah-tc-south-cibo-express-gourmet-market

A new concept to IAH as part of the renovations are the CIBO Express Gourmet Markets, where United customers can use reward miles to purchase food and other items. Terminal E will also include a CIBO Express Gourmet Market.

Magnolia Meatball Shop

iah-tc-south-magnolia-view-1.jpg

Magnolia Meatball Shop will offer comfort food and will be in Terminal C South. Magnolia Meatball Shop is a concept from Chef Christopher Williams, who co-founded Lucille's Restaurant in Houston.

BeerHive

iah-te-beerhive-view-1.jpg

In Terminal E, BeerHive is a locally sourced craft beer bar. It will also include bar pies, sandwiches, salads and other foods.

Gavi

iah-te-gavi-view-1.jpg

iah-te-gavi-view-2.jpg

Gavi is an Italian concept by by Chef Ryan Pera and will be in Terminal E. Pera is the chef behind Houston restaurants Coltivare and Revival Market. Gavi will also have a wine bar.

Q

iah-te-q-view-1.jpg

iah-te-q-view-2.jpg

iah-te-q-view-3.jpg

Q is a project by Chef Greg Gatlin of Gatlin's BBQ and will be in Terminal E. Q will include fresh-smoked meats made in a custom smoker along with signature rubs.

Tanglewood Grille

iah-te-tanglewood-grille-view-2.jpg

iah-te-tanglewood-grille-view-3.jpg

Tanglewood Grille is a collaboration between Chefs Seth Siegel Gardner and Terrence Gallivan. The chefs met developing Maze at the London Hotel in New York and are behind Houston's Pass and Provisions. Tanglewood Grille will be in Terminal E and serve hand-cut steaks, burgers, fresh seafood and farm-to-table greens.

Yume

iah-te-yume-view-1.jpg

iah-te-yume-view-2.jpg

Yume will be in Terminal E and is a sushi and ramen kitchen with a focus on Japanese-sourced ingredients. Yume will also have an Asian biergarten and is a collaboration between Chefs Chris Kinjo and Mike Tran. Tran is also the chef at Tiger Den, a Houston yakitori and ramen restaurant and Kinjo is behind Houston's MF Sushi.

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I am shocked! This development is turning out much better than I imagined. It's finally starting to look like Houston is becoming a unique destination even at the airport. Terminals are always the first impression of a city for those flying in and I can't wait to see how the rest of the airport is going to turn out these next few years. 

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