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Le Meridien (Melrose Building) At 1121 Walker St.


dbigtex56

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^^^ jesus christ, this looks like a circa 1950's hospital in the med center. no way, they should re-create this god awful 1950's look, in today's 2015 downtown CBD. this would be a national embarrassment for houston....

Monarch forgetting to make the usual grammar/spelling errors. Pretty funny.

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You've stated your opinion on the building. Many people disagree with you.

I think it's going to be awesome!

^^^ well then, it seems that we have both become equal to some degree.  you've stated your opinion as well, and now many people disagree with you.....

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This thread has become chronish. The Melrose Building is far better than anything currently under construction in this city.

 

I've lost all hope in the world. Im gonna go listen to some death metal and break stuff.

 

Kind of startled by your second sentence but you're right, the Melrose isn't a bad building, and captures a certain era of our architectural history, turquoise and all.

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Idk....maybe this will grow on me as I see it more and more often, but as of now......don't really like it....

 

And yea you're right houstontexasjack, we should, I don't like seeing this forum get all crazy over one building and how they perceive it.....

Edited by H-TownChris2
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^^^ jesus christ, this looks like a circa 1950's hospital in the med center.  no way, they should re-create this god awful 1950's look, in today's 2015 downtown CBD.  this would be a national embarrassment for houston....

 

 

If they're going to restore an old building, it only makes sense to, you know, restore it, original color and all.  Look how nice the Marriott turned out, compared to its 806 Main predecessor.  Would you prefer they demolish it?

 

Another period detail that I really like is the 'brises soleil' providing some shade on the southern and eastern exposures.  A number of buildings from that era had something similar:  First City, Exxon, Fannin Bank.  It makes such perfect sense in a climate like Houston.  I'm surprise that it isn't used more often.

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If they're going to restore an old building, it only makes sense to, you know, restore it, original color and all. Look how nice the Marriott turned out, compared to its 806 Main predecessor. Would you prefer they demolish it?

Another period detail that I really like is the 'brises soleil' providing some shade on the southern and eastern exposures. A number of buildings from that era had something similar: First City, Exxon, Fannin Bank. It makes such perfect sense in a climate like Houston. I'm surprise that it isn't used more often.

You can't really compare two very different designs on a building though. Yeah, it's cool how the Marriott turned out, but this is the Marriott. You can't just throw out a blanket statement like that without really looking at the two projects you're referring to.
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If they're going to restore an old building, it only makes sense to, you know, restore it, original color and all.  Look how nice the Marriott turned out, compared to its 806 Main predecessor.  Would you prefer they demolish it?

 

Another period detail that I really like is the 'brises soleil' providing some shade on the southern and eastern exposures.  A number of buildings from that era had something similar:  First City, Exxon, Fannin Bank.  It makes such perfect sense in a climate like Houston.  I'm surprise that it isn't used more often.

^^^ subdude, god knows that i love you.  i am most appreciative that you have joined in upon this particular melrose edifice debate.  however, my good pal, please bear in mind that i am a member that has worked and traveled extensively basically all over the world.  i am not an architect, a notable building historian, an engineer, or anything of the sort.  however, i do indeed love building architecture.  i do indeed know a thing or two about scopes and scales, beauty, along with overall aesthetics of edifices, and how it relays to the immediate environment and element.  i have had the foremost privilege of residing at some of the most formidable LE MERIDIEN hotels while abroad.  HOTEL LE MERIDIEN & YACHT CLUB, thailand, LE MERIDIEN HOTEL dubai, LE MERIDIEN ISTANBUL, turkey, just to name a few.  please trust me my pal subdude, i do indeed know LE MERIDIEN.

 

i see that you have brought up the new JW MARRIOTT upon this particular debate as well.  basically everyone here, may attest that i was one of the foremost drivers as per that particular restoration / renovation project.  heck, i am still beaming every time that i think of it.  that particular project was hereby developed with foremost taste and grandeur.  along with a superior style and quality, to a degree that we had yet seen in the houston area for edifices of hospitality.  the history of the carter building, was always front and center during the restoration. nonetheless, there was always the very hint of "making everything much more luxurious, stylish, and qualitative.  therefore, taking a historical edifice and making it a modern / contemporary dream, is something that i can very easily cherish if it is done correctly.

 

i absolutely love the very idea of restoring and renovating the old historical MELROSE BUILDING.  personally, i do not know very much about it, aside from what i have researched and referenced.  i think that it is one of houston's CBD gems.  however, should it be restored, i think that it should be done so brilliantly.  it should be restored all the while incorporating the very same mindset of the MARRIOTT, bringing back the old splendor, and yet enhancing it to make it fit in with modern day houston.  sorry my pal, but those turquoise tiles, are not modern day houston. those highly flamboyant colored tiles, would stand out horrendously, and not allow this prospective hospitality edifice the luxury and warmth, that this building would need to obtain the allure of style and taste.  trust me, my pal, everything goes hand in hand with a restoration project... it's just not always that easy.

 

i want the MELROSE building transformation to a LE MERIDIEN, to become a paramount success.  i want it to be beautiful, stylish, warm, and qualitative.  i want it to shine like a star.....            

 

le_meridien.png

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i see that you have brought up the new JW MARRIOTT upon this particular debate as well.  basically everyone here, may attest that i was one of the foremost drivers as per that particular restoration / renovation project.  heck, i am still beaming every time that i think of it.  that particular project was hereby developed with foremost taste and grandeur.  along with a superior style and quality, to a degree that we had yet seen in the houston area for edifices of hospitality.  the history of the carter building, was always front and center during the restoration. nonetheless, there was always the very hint of "making everything much more luxurious, stylish, and qualitative.  therefore, taking a historical edifice and making it a modern / contemporary dream, is something that i can very easily cherish if it is done correctly.

 

i absolutely love the very idea of restoring and renovating the old historical MELROSE BUILDING.  personally, i do not know very much about it, aside from what i have researched and referenced.  i think that it is one of houston's CBD gems.  however, should it be restored, i think that it should be done so brilliantly.

 

It's worth pointing out that when all this is said and done, the Melrose will have its original brick, while the Marriott will have brick-patterned foam board that any woodpecker could take a chunk out of.

 

And the history of the Carter building was not front and center when they put those cheesy stars on it. I'll take the turquoise.

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It's worth pointing out that when all this is said and done, the Melrose will have its original brick, while the Marriott will have brick-patterned foam board that any woodpecker could take a chunk out of.

 

And the history of the Carter building was not front and center when they put those cheesy stars on it. I'll take the turquoise.

26-JW-Marriott-Houston-exterior-at-night

 

the new JW MARRIOTT downtown houston CBD is drop dead gorgeous.

this shall include it's "brick-patterned foam board" along with artistic qualitative masonry.

heck, even your woodpecker's beaming...

Pica-Pau.png

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Tbh the original design might not be so bland if they covered the blank walls abutting on the southeast(?) corner with a glass curtain wall facade. Like different colors and sizes of glass paneling or something kind of funky to make this hotel stand out. Those walls seem far too barren for a high class hotel..

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26-JW-Marriott-Houston-exterior-at-night

 

the new JW MARRIOTT downtown houston CBD is drop dead gorgeous.

this shall include it's "brick-patterned foam board" along with artistic qualitative masonry.

heck, even your woodpecker's beaming...

Pica-Pau.png

 

 

Monarch, I think the JW looks great, especially when it is lit up like this. The original building was incredible.

 

I know I wont convince you, nor will I try, but I think of it like a different flavor completely.... JW Marriott is the classic Chocolate with sprinkles - hard not to like, a staple for most.... Le Meridian is like a Red Velvet - only recently has it come back into favor, its becoming trendy... its not a classic... But the fact that Houston can have both flavors... a 1950s mod building and a 1920s classic, compliments the city, the diversity, and each's architectural styles. I think that the sharp lines will be both dramatic and sleek when Le Meridian is done with it... I welcome the uniqueness.

 

:) 

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^^^ i wholesomely agree avossos.  i do indeed.  however, i just do not like or appreciate those horrendous turquoise tiles.  nonetheless, i shall wait patiently for the renderings / concepts to come forth, and then we shall see the overall scope and scale of the project.  let us be at peace and keep our fingers crossed....

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26-JW-Marriott-Houston-exterior-at-night

 

the new JW MARRIOTT downtown houston CBD is drop dead gorgeous.

this shall include it's "brick-patterned foam board" along with artistic qualitative masonry.

heck, even your woodpecker's beaming...

Pica-Pau.png

 

 

I don't think there is any actual masonry in that photo, except for the bricks on Main Street. But it does look pretty.

Edited by H-Town Man
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I'm welcoming a dash of actual color in a downtown palette made up primarily of buff brick, glass in various shades of gray from almost black up to silver, dark brown or silver mullions, and gray or white stone, broken only by a couple buildings on the Western Wall.

 

Will I paint my house turquoise, or order up a new turquoise car?  No, in part because it wouldn't fit - the house is too old, and the car is too new.  It is, however, one of the signature colors of that era, and fits in much better with the overall vibe of that building than the dark glass spandrels.  Thankfully, they're probably not going to be as hard to get rid of as the white marble and spandrel glass on the Carter building was.

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I don't think there is any actual masonry in that photo, except for the bricks on Main Street. But it does look pretty.

 

There is actual stone masonry from the third floor down.  IIRC, though, the ledge above the third floor is foam and Silly Putty.

 

Now for some real masonry, head west a block to the Neils Esperon, which even has detailed, multi colored terra cotta medallions on the 20th or 21st floor, with enough adornment above that to make Le Corbusier snarl.

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There is actual stone masonry from the third floor down.  IIRC, though, the ledge above the third floor is foam and Silly Putty.

 

Now for some real masonry, head west a block to the Neils Esperon, which even has detailed, multi colored terra cotta medallions on the 20th or 21st floor, with enough adornment above that to make Le Corbusier snarl.

 

If that is the case, I stand corrected. I thought that portion was EIFS.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Might there be a reason that the period for turquoise was brief?

 

Fleeting, like many fads.  I think it was really only popular for a decade or so, from the early 1950s to 1960s.  The post-modernism of the 1980s and brutalism of the 1970s also had short shelf lives.

 

I just dug up some old photos, and when I get the chance I'm going to do a post on Houston's historic turquoise buildings.

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Fleeting, like many fads.  I think it was really only popular for a decade or so, from the early 1950s to 1960s.  The post-modernism of the 1980s and brutalism of the 1970s also had short shelf lives.

 

I just dug up some old photos, and when I get the chance I'm going to do a post on Houston's historic turquoise buildings.

 

Oooooh I'm looking forward to your turquoise post!!!

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I'll give you a yaaaaah. With this, the upcoming Aloft, the JW, Capitol Lofts, upcoming 1111 Rusk Apartments, Kirby Lofts, the Saint Germain, Commerce Towers, BG Group Place and 609 Main all within 2 two blocks, the Dollar / Food store at Main and Walker seems increasingly out of place. The Main Street corridor is going to be awesome and will be the bridge linking south Downtown, Market Square Park and the new Ballpark district - not to mention areas outside of Downtown via the light rail.

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The name fooled you... LM is not a luxury hotel in the truest sense of the term. It's a nice brand but that's about it. Architecturally the one in San Francisco is similarly architecturally unremarkable.

 

^^^ not so fast my good pal swtsig.  please reference below illustrations as per a couple of LE MERIDIEN hotels that i have lodged at .  i can assure you that true LUXURY abounds...

 

mer1848ag.102711_xx.jpg

LE MERIDIEN beach resort phuket, thailand

Le-Meridien-Phuket-Beach-Resort-family-f

this particular resort hotel was a masterpiece.  luxury was everywhere...

Le-Meridien-HKT-OV-JSuiteMP.jpg

the rooms are super luxurious... to die for...

Le-Meridien-resized.gif

LE MERIDIEN dubai. just one of two.  simply gorgeous

18686_009_QmFsbHJvb20=.jpg

i would say that this is quite luxurious... indeed.

8429569_x.jpeg

 

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Monarch, don't confuse resorts and hotels. Marriott resorts can be very nice, but that doesn't make it a luxury hotel brand. I've stayed in the LM in LA and it was nice but not a luxury brand. The building didn't stand out and the location wasn't great either. My only wish would be for balconies. That would be baller if they could incorporate that somehow.

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  • The title was changed to Melrose Building At 1121 Walker St.
  • The title was changed to Le Meridien (Melrose Building) At 1121 Walker St.

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