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Finally, the new campus will feature a 19-story TMC Hotel and Conference Center. The hotel is expected to have 410 rooms, and the conference center is planned to encompass 50,000 square feet. A flag has not been selected for the hotel, McKeon said.

 

"We've been approached by many major flags," McKeon said. "Our data shows we could go without a flag, which is pretty impressive. Or we may choose to go with one if we meet the right partner."

 

I'm new to this terminology. A flag? I assume this is hotel branding.

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19 minutes ago, Twitter1 said:

 

I'm new to this terminology. A flag? I assume this is hotel branding.

 

Means franchise. Hilton, Marriott, etc

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2 minutes ago, Vy65 said:

 

Means franchise. Hilton, Marriott, etc

 

Thought so.  I still like the TMC Hotel branding. That's unique to us and the TMC.

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Im  confused. Is this stage one. In the above rendering the tall  building on the left is already there. its the M.D. Anderson tower south of MacGregor on Bertner. The one on the lower right is the future St. Lukes.

The one on the bottom left is the new forensic lab. So where did those other building and hotel go that were in all of the earlier renderings?

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18 minutes ago, bobruss said:

Im  confused. Is this stage one. In the above rendering the tall  building on the left is already there. its the M.D. Anderson tower south of MacGregor on Bertner. The one on the lower right is the future St. Lukes.

The one on the bottom left is the new forensic lab. So where did those other building and hotel go that were in all of the earlier renderings?

 

It is a phased project. Those other attached buildings next to the helix will be built out by the other institutions.

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Was pondering this last night.

 

While this is an amazing project and I'm already liking the design of it, without a doubt, if this gets built, this will solidify Houston as the "kings of Kitsch". Lets admit it, the concept/parti of this building...is pretty kitschy. Some Designer, "Medical building...what is something that is immediately identifiable as medical...DNA!" It took me awhile to figure out why we seemed to have an immediate emotional reaction to this building where others we sorta kinda have to wait for it to grow on us a bit. Maybe its the scale. Maybe its the idea of what it brings to Houston. Probably all of that. However, I think it might be the immediate representation of the building and its ties to the Medical field, is why it seems to get such favor from us. With that being said, what I seem to appreciate the most is that while the concept/parti is pure kitsch the final product is not. Its very much more refined. Refined Kitsch? I say this because there is the clear other example of kitsch that many of us architects (while adorable in some way) wouldn't ever subscribe to the thought of it as being good. There is a building near outside of Baytown that is a tool shop. The building, as if its the embodiment of what happens inside...is a literal toolbox on the outside. The outside looks like a literal tool box with large ornamental latches, etc... Its incredibly kitschy and on-the-nose (for some reason I admire it though). This new medical facility is exactly that in some ways, but more refined. I wouldn't even mind if this was an architectural direction for Houston. This town has always been a little kitschy, but this "refined kitsch" in concept, yet contemporary in execution, is actually pretty stunning and mostly unassuming unless we are looking from above. For that reason it feels like it really belongs here. A symbol in some way of Houston's maturity in all aspects. 

Edited by Luminare
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It might be "kitschy" in its concept and recreation of some object related to its field, but its execution and design is anything but. I guess it's serendipitous that the DNA double helix could make for a good design in any sort of campus, due to its graceful organic lines and cohesive gathering areas enclosed by the overlapping chains. 

Perhaps it's kitsch in concept; the design is anything but.

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1 hour ago, jmosele said:

It might be "kitschy" in its concept and recreation of some object related to its field, but its execution and design is anything but. I guess it's serendipitous that the DNA double helix could make for a good design in any sort of campus, due to its graceful organic lines and cohesive gathering areas enclosed by the overlapping chains. 

Perhaps it's kitsch in concept; the design is anything but.

 

Exactly. That's exactly my point! I don't mind kitsch that much actually. Kitsch can be fun. There is actually quite a bit of experimentation with it many different forms, but in a pragmatic sense. Pragmatically the parti was most certainly a means to an end. It probably made it easier to program as well. Some forms are just like that right? 

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Thank you, Luminare, for reminding us that HAIF, after all, is an architecture forum...and not just a real estate development forum.  Great point of view and post. 

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Any hope of tying this into the light rail somehow?  It's not that far to Fannin from the site - maybe a shuttle/trolley, or moving sidewalks....I guess you have to get all the way to Fannin x Pressler for the closest station though.  Hopefully this jump starts some further redevelopment of that stretch between Fannin and Bertner

 

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17 minutes ago, longcat said:

Any hope of tying this into the light rail somehow?  It's not that far to Fannin from the site - maybe a shuttle/trolley, or moving sidewalks....I guess you have to get all the way to Fannin x Pressler for the closest station though.  Hopefully this jump starts some further redevelopment of that stretch between Fannin and Bertner

 

 

It is a bit disappointing the site is not closer to a rail station, but I imagine it will be served by the Medical Center Shuttles. (There are currently three different shuttle routes that provide circulation within the Medical Center.)

http://www.tmc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/TMC_Shuttle_Brochure_031416.pdf

Edited by Houston19514
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1 hour ago, Houston19514 said:

 

It is a bit disappointing the site is not closer to a rail station, but I imagine it will be served by the Medical Center Shuttles. (There are currently three different shuttle routes that provide circulation within the Medical Center.)

http://www.tmc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/TMC_Shuttle_Brochure_031416.pdf

This is directly on a route that makes a Bertner loop so I'm sure it will be. There is a large parking area on this site right now adjacent to the 30 story M.D. Anderson boat shaped tower

on Bertner, so I would think that this will be addressed. Since my wife works in the UT school of nursing directly across the bayou from this site I will definitely spend time looking out her 6th floor office at the construction. Its a tighter fit than it seems from the renderings wedged between the DSt Lukes hospital; and the Forensic building. It will be interesting to see it come to fruition.

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On ‎4‎/‎26‎/‎2018 at 4:44 AM, Luminare said:

Was pondering this last night.

 

While this is an amazing project and I'm already liking the design of it, without a doubt, if this gets built, this will solidify Houston as the "kings of Kitsch". Lets admit it, the concept/parti of this building...is pretty kitschy. Some Designer, "Medical building...what is something that is immediately identifiable as medical...DNA!" It took me awhile to figure out why we seemed to have an immediate emotional reaction to this building where others we sorta kinda have to wait for it to grow on us a bit. Maybe its the scale. Maybe its the idea of what it brings to Houston. Probably all of that. However, I think it might be the immediate representation of the building and its ties to the Medical field, is why it seems to get such favor from us. With that being said, what I seem to appreciate the most is that while the concept/parti is pure kitsch the final product is not. Its very much more refined. Refined Kitsch? I say this because there is the clear other example of kitsch that many of us architects (while adorable in some way) wouldn't ever subscribe to the thought of it as being good. There is a building near outside of Baytown that is a tool shop. The building, as if its the embodiment of what happens inside...is a literal toolbox on the outside. The outside looks like a literal tool box with large ornamental latches, etc... Its incredibly kitschy and on-the-nose (for some reason I admire it though). This new medical facility is exactly that in some ways, but more refined. I wouldn't even mind if this was an architectural direction for Houston. This town has always been a little kitschy, but this "refined kitsch" in concept, yet contemporary in execution, is actually pretty stunning and mostly unassuming unless we are looking from above. For that reason it feels like it really belongs here. A symbol in some way of Houston's maturity in all aspects. 

 

Good comment. Lots of kitsch in American architecture, although it doesn't seem kitschy when it becomes familiar. A train station in New York modeled to look like the Baths of Caracalla. Most classical architecture, arguably. A giant Egyptian obelisk in the middle of the National Mall in D.C. A giant Egyptian obelisk with a huge star on top on the Houston Ship Channel. A replica of Mount Vernon on White Rock Lake in Dallas - that's got to be the most embarrassing. A replica of the Crystal Palace on Stemmons Freeway in Dallas, which is pretty nice.

 

Some of these have aged better than others. The Hines architecture school was initially pretty kitschy, being a replica of an 18th century design, but I think it has improved over time. The point is though, Houston does kitsch - but so does everybody else. And we do it very well, for the most part.

 

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43 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Why did you post a uterus diagram? Is there a women's health component going into this?

 

OMG that's hilarious I never thought of that for their mascot branding LOL !  well done.

 

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On ‎4‎/‎26‎/‎2018 at 4:44 AM, Luminare said:

While this is an amazing project and I'm already liking the design of it, without a doubt, if this gets built, this will solidify Houston as the "kings of Kitsch". Lets admit it, the concept/parti of this building...is pretty kitschy. Some Designer, "Medical building...what is something that is immediately identifiable as medical...DNA!" 

Much like St. Luke's, which can be seen either as hypodermic needles, or Madonna during her bullet bra phase.

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4 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Why did you post a uterus diagram? Is there a women's health component going into this?

 

The similarity occurred to me many years ago but, being married to a UT grad and having several others in the family, "I kept my vision to myself." :) 

 

Regarding the kitsch factor of the double helix as it becomes familiar the public will inure to it. Also, renderings are usually taken from a bird's-eye view, or at least an elevated perspective, that most people on the ground will never see so the association will not be as obvious.

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3 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Good comment. Lots of kitsch in American architecture, although it doesn't seem kitschy when it becomes familiar. A train station in New York modeled to look like the Baths of Caracalla. Most classical architecture, arguably. A giant Egyptian obelisk in the middle of the National Mall in D.C. A giant Egyptian obelisk with a huge star on top on the Houston Ship Channel. A replica of Mount Vernon on White Rock Lake in Dallas - that's got to be the most embarrassing. A replica of the Crystal Palace on Stemmons Freeway in Dallas, which is pretty nice.

 

Some of these have aged better than others. The Hines architecture school was initially pretty kitschy, being a replica of an 18th century design, but I think it has improved over time. The point is though, Houston does kitsch - but so does everybody else. And we do it very well, for the most part.

 

 

You bring some good points as well, but only to a point. I think this is where one thinks kitsch is a part of art or its a separate thing. I fall in line with the actual definition of kitsch and as it was put forth by the creators of the term in that; kitsch is more a cheap imitation of art with the attempt to bring about an immediate emotional response with little intellectual effort. Some don't believe this though and associate kitsch as just a lower form of art. There are best interpretations, but it is up to each person. Also just because its an imitation doesn't mean that its kitsch. A revivalist movement isn't kitsch, such as Egyptian Revival or Gothic Revival. Those movements only borrow motifs or derive inspiration from other buildings instead of ripping off. But a clear rip-off like the "Crystal Palace" building, that is in Dallas, is definitely kitsch. Its a cheap, low intellectual effort, that only has aged well because what it borrowed so blatantly from is so admired.

The train station you talking about is taking queues from, but its not a literal ripoff of that bath house. Same with the obelisk in DC. Now if they made the obelisk look like it was dug up from an egyptian ruin while making the lawn look like a sand dune...total kitsch (that would actually be hilarious haha). The San Jacinto Monument is actually original. Its purely art deco in style. The Replica you pointed out...defintely Kitsch and is embarrassing haha.

Most American architecture isn't really kitsch. Its mostly revival styles in nature. It's architecture that is heavily influenced by other architecture abroad, but not straight rip-offs. Kitsch is around the US definitely as you said correctly, but its mostly in isolated instances on roadways or in small towns. Houston is a city where it seems to embrace it in some way. Like the top of one of our skyscrapers literally looking like a mayan temple! Its not a motif. its a clear imitation. Its a cheap idea, but its so weird, goofy, and proud, that it actually works.

Interested to know what others think about this including you @H-Town Man

 

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5 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

You bring some good points as well, but only to a point. I think this is where one thinks kitsch is a part of art or its a separate thing. I fall in line with the actual definition of kitsch and as it was put forth by the creators of the term in that; kitsch is more a cheap imitation of art with the attempt to bring about an immediate emotional response with little intellectual effort. Some don't believe this though and associate kitsch as just a lower form of art. There are best interpretations, but it is up to each person. Also just because its an imitation doesn't mean that its kitsch. A revivalist movement isn't kitsch, such as Egyptian Revival or Gothic Revival. Those movements only borrow motifs or derive inspiration from other buildings instead of ripping off. But a clear rip-off like the "Crystal Palace" building, that is in Dallas, is definitely kitsch. Its a cheap, low intellectual effort, that only has aged well because what it borrowed so blatantly from is so admired.

The train station you talking about is taking queues from, but its not a literal ripoff of that bath house. Same with the obelisk in DC. Now if they made the obelisk look like it was dug up from an egyptian ruin while making the lawn look like a sand dune...total kitsch (that would actually be hilarious haha). The San Jacinto Monument is actually original. Its purely art deco in style. The Replica you pointed out...defintely Kitsch and is embarrassing haha.

Most American architecture isn't really kitsch. Its mostly revival styles in nature. It's architecture that is heavily influenced by other architecture abroad, but not straight rip-offs. Kitsch is around the US definitely as you said correctly, but its mostly in isolated instances on roadways or in small towns. Houston is a city where it seems to embrace it in some way. Like the top of one of our skyscrapers literally looking like a mayan temple! Its not a motif. its a clear imitation. Its a cheap idea, but its so weird, goofy, and proud, that it actually works.

Interested to know what others think about this including you @H-Town Man

 

 

I remember spending a day talking about kitsch in my Philosophy of Art class in college, but can't remember clearly what was said about it. I think we ultimately just decided that one couldn't draw any clear line or state any set of "necessary and sufficient conditions" for what constitutes kitsch, which fits with the postmodern spirit of that class, which never came to any definite conclusion on anything.

 

Hard to draw a distinction between a copy and a revival, or to say that one is always bad while the other is good. Although I agree in principle. Mount Vernon Dallas is bad, but does that mean that the Hines architecture school is bad, since it's a copy? Is close resemblance the same as a copy? Would the Transco Tower be a copy of the Panhellenic Building in New York (visible nightly as a wooden model behind Jimmy Fallon's desk)? The Infomart isn't an exact copy of the Crystal Palace, and since the CP burned down, I'm glad that it was brought back to life somewhere on earth. The San Jacinto monument is certainly original, but a Texas star on top of an Egyptian obelisk - some might call it kitsch.

 

There was once a thread on here way long ago about a high school that was going to be a giant Monticello, I think somewhere near Humble. Viciously attacked. Might satisfy your criteria.

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28 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

I remember spending a day talking about kitsch in my Philosophy of Art class in college, but can't remember clearly what was said about it. I think we ultimately just decided that one couldn't draw any clear line or state any set of "necessary and sufficient conditions" for what constitutes kitsch, which fits with the postmodern spirit of that class, which never came to any definite conclusion on anything.

 

Hard to draw a distinction between a copy and a revival, or to say that one is always bad while the other is good. Although I agree in principle. Mount Vernon Dallas is bad, but does that mean that the Hines architecture school is bad, since it's a copy? Is close resemblance the same as a copy? Would the Transco Tower be a copy of the Panhellenic Building in New York (visible nightly as a wooden model behind Jimmy Fallon's desk)? The Infomart isn't an exact copy of the Crystal Palace, and since the CP burned down, I'm glad that it was brought back to life somewhere on earth. The San Jacinto monument is certainly original, but a Texas star on top of an Egyptian obelisk - some might call it kitsch.

 

There was once a thread on here way long ago about a high school that was going to be a giant Monticello, I think somewhere near Humble. Viciously attacked. Might satisfy your criteria.

 

Don't even get me started with Post-Modernism haha. Lets not even go there! Been recently exploring Post-Modernism as a whole way too much. One could make an argument that post-modernism in many instances is glorified kitsch. I'm sorry, but, while there are many many interpretations of the world (a point post-modern's got right), there are only a finite set of best interpretations (then again I'm a pragmatist).

Transco is kitsch in a way for sure, but more in concept like this new building we are talking about. Its silhouette is that of a lighthouse, and takes edges from art deco, and is post modern in execution (Phillip Johnson was a crazy mad scientist haha).

Seems we could start a whole new thread on this, so we better stay on topic haha. @H-Town Man

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31 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

Don't even get me started with Post-Modernism haha. Lets not even go there! Been recently exploring Post-Modernism as a whole way too much. One could make an argument that post-modernism in many instances is glorified kitsch. I'm sorry, but, while there are many many interpretations of the world (a point post-modern's got right), there are only a finite set of best interpretations (then again I'm a pragmatist).

Transco is kitsch in a way for sure, but more in concept like this new building we are talking about. Its silhouette is that of a lighthouse, and takes edges from art deco, and is post modern in execution (Phillip Johnson was a crazy mad scientist haha).

Seems we could start a whole new thread on this, so we better stay on topic haha. @H-Town Man

 

Right. I meant the class was postmodern philosophically, in that one could never definitely say anything. No distinction between kitsch and non-kitsch, high and low art, etc.

 

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Relevant, although it wont be located in TMC3. But I'm sure TMC3 and the innovation corridor had everything do to with bringing this here. 

 

Houston, China to partner on biotech innovation

 

Quote

A Chinese nonprofit plans to open an innovation center in the Texas Medical Center to focus on fostering cutting-edge biomedical companies.

The proposed China U.S. Biotechnology Innovation Center, also known as CUBIC, will serve as a bridge for Chinese companies looking to invest in Houston, and vice versa. Jiangsu Industrial Technology Research Institute, or JITRI, a nonprofit group based in the eastern Chinese province of Jiangsu, plans to invest $3 million to $4 million a year to fund research and help companies expand their footprint abroad.


 

Quote

Liu has identified a 100,500-square-foot space in the Texas Medical Center, but he did specify the location.

He hopes to open CUBIC sometime this year.

“This center will act as a bridge for companies looking for investments, manufacturing partners and business partners,” Liu said. “We really hope we can attract some Chinese companies to come to Houston.”

The partnership is the latest in a string of announcements that aims to position Houston as the “third coast” for biotechnology and biomedicine after the northeast and the West Coast.


 

Edited by AREJAY
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As for the whole Amazon thing, the failure of HERO back in 2015 is likely what killed Houston's chances, especially in conjunction with other factors. LGBT friendliness is a huge (but unspoken) factor regarding Amazon's HQ2 search:
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-amazon-headquarters-gay-rights-20180427-story.html

 

No city in a red state will get picked.

Edited by AnTonY
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I agree with you, AnTonY. The repeal of HERO and the ridiculous bathroom bill attempts will not soon be forgotten by any progressive company, like Amazon. Damage done. 

Edited by Naviguessor
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Anyone know when ground breaking is scheduled for TMC3 ?  The rate of growth of the TMC ( this included) is going to push the square footage to over 60 million sq. ft.  which will place it 6th or 7th nationwide. Truly remarkable. Worked there for 22 years. It is amazing the changes since 2005. Same goes for midtown.

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2 hours ago, Twinsanity02 said:

Anyone know when ground breaking is scheduled for TMC3 ?  The rate of growth of the TMC ( this included) is going to push the square footage to over 60 million sq. ft.  which will place it 6th or 7th nationwide. Truly remarkable. Worked there for 22 years. It is amazing the changes since 2005. Same goes for midtown.

 

Groundbreaking is expected to be in 2019.

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The Texas Medical Center as well as NASA are places which cannot be replicated, especially TMC. They are unique. They are only in Houston.  It is our Wall Street. There cannot be  another Wall Street, there  cannot be another TMC. We have a great Port, great Art Museum, great skyscrapers and malls, but so do other cities. 

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Pretty sure NASA is in several other cities. And I’m sure those other facilities have more going on than what’s down in clear lake

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On 4/27/2018 at 10:17 AM, H-Town Man said:

 

Why did you post a UTerus diagram? Is there a women's health component going into this?

 

 

FTFY

 

UTerus.gif

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https://www.virtualbx.com/construction-preview/houston-planning-commission-gets-early-look-at-tmc3/

 



Houston (Harris County) – There’s been some sensational descriptions of the TMC3 campus over the past few years, but other than conceptual renderings little in the way of concrete action.

That all changed in late April when the founding institutions announced a 30-acre collaborative research campus with an “anticipated groundbreaking” in 2019 and completion in 2022.

Founding Institutions:

 

Texas Medical Center (TMC)

Baylor College of Medicine

Texas A&M University Health Science Center

University of Texas Heaalth Science center at Houston (UTHealth)

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

 

Since then, the civil engineer firm Walter P. Moore & Associates has submitted a master plan schematic to the Houston Planning and Development Department as part of a request for a variance to waive a requirement to extend Lehall Street, which at present reaches the west site of the project site at its center.

 

The Planning Commission has the variance request on its Thursday agenda.

 

The TMC3 Innovation Campus is proposed to be developed on the South Extension Parking Lot, something VBX first reported in April 2016. Also, see Project ID 2016-2796.

 

The briefing document submitted to the Planning Commission states, “This master plan, shown in the attached exhibit, includes a central multipurpose building surrounded by four research towers. When Bertner Avenue was planned to be realigned between Braeswood Boulevard and OST several streets were abandoned as part of the right-of-way dedication and abandonment.

 

These activities allowed for the development of the MDACC Administration Building at the southeast corner of Braeswood Boulevard and Bertner Avenue. At that time there was a conceptual plan for how the existing Texas Medical Center South Extension Parking Lot may be redeveloped in the future, but there were no definite plans for specific projects.”

 

Gensler is the architect designing the new campus, which is going to include more than 1.5 million square feet. The concept of a campus for five institutions is to bring together leading researchers with a broad array of top-tier expertise from the private sector.

 

During a joint press conference held April 23, TMC President and CEO William F. McKeon said, “The TMC3 campus will establish Houston as the Third Coast for life sciences, attracting the best scientific minds from around the globe. With researchers working hand-in-hand alongside industry titans on this new campus, Texas Medical Center as a whole will further advance its position as a preeminent global player in life sciences.”

 

The project is estimated to generate $5.2 billion and create 30,000 new jobs.

 

The centerpiece of the TMC3 campus – resembling the indelible double helix shape of a DNA strand – will be a multi-story building spanning nearly the entire length of the 30-acre complex. The shared facility will include core laboratories, restaurants, retail and commercial space.

 

The crown jewel of the facility will be an elevated park designed by famed High Line landscape architect James Corner. The rooftop park – which will be open to the public – will soar 60 feet above the campus, offer sweeping views of downtown Houston, and feature gardens, walking and running trails.

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Slightly off topic, but healthcare is always increasing. There are so many major healthcare projects in the works.

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On ‎4‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 2:39 PM, Luminare said:

Kitsch is around the US definitely as you said correctly, but its mostly in isolated instances on roadways or in small towns. Houston is a city where it seems to embrace it in some way.

Among the kitschiest examples relates to the Medical Center: the Bloch Cancer Survivors Plaza.
If for some people it serves its intended function of providing inspiration for those battling cancer, or those who've survived it, good. I'm happy that they're comforted.
For other people, it's so bad that it's funny, and falls into the category of "laughter is the best medicine". 

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1 hour ago, dbigtex56 said:

Among the kitschiest examples relates to the Medical Center: the Bloch Cancer Survivors Plaza.
If for some people it serves its intended function of providing inspiration for those battling cancer, or those who've survived it, good. I'm happy that they're comforted.
For other people, it's so bad that it's funny, and falls into the category of "laughter is the best medicine". 

 

What do you not like about it? I found it dignified and, although I don't think most cancer survivors will ever walk through it, many will see it and take something from knowing it's there. Apparently the Bloch family has done these in a number of cities, all different.

 

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Maybe my definition of kitsch is a stretch but the Amazing Body Gallery of the McGovern Museum of Health & Medical Science with its colossal body parts seems to fit the bill. It is also quite a contrast to the stately appearance of the building's exterior. In any case, dbigtex56 has a point. If a little kitsch inspires someone or just makes him feel a little bit more upbeat it has served a positive purpose. 

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