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1810 Main St. (Block 387): Multifamily by Fairfield Residential


DrLan34

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/11/2020 at 3:16 PM, j_cuevas713 said:

What is the general consensus among us here in HAIF about all of this mid-rise apartments? Could we see these structures around for the next 100 years? Just curious what yall think

 100 years anywhere in the US (or most places) for an apartment building is very aspirational. 50 years seems a little more realistic, though still optimistic, and I'd guess many will meet that criteria.

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My rankings for downtown development:

  1. Tall building with GFR
  2. Mid-rise with retail on the ground floor
  3. Lot line building, 1-2 stories, with a shop, bar, or restaurant in it
  4. Mid-rise building 
  5. Tall building
  6. Park (public space mainly with grass)
  7. Plaza (public space mainly with concrete)
  8. Nice looking parking garage
  9. vacant lot covered in grass
  10. active construction site
  11. giant hole in the ground
  12. parking lot
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11 minutes ago, cspwal said:

My rankings for downtown development:

  1. Tall building with GFR
  2. Mid-rise with retail on the ground floor
  3. Lot line building, 1-2 stories, with a shop, bar, or restaurant in it
  4. Mid-rise building 
  5. Tall building
  6. Park (public space mainly with grass)
  7. Plaza (public space mainly with concrete)
  8. Nice looking parking garage
  9. vacant lot covered in grass
  10. active construction site
  11. giant hole in the ground
  12. parking lot

I would have put "Johnny on the Job edifice" for #12 and parking lot as #13, but your list is spot on.

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9 hours ago, cspwal said:

I'm thinking more day to day, walking around level.  That vacant lot makes a great dog-playing-catch area downtown 

You mean the old YMCA lot? If so then I can do without that grass field. That old yellow and red brick building was cute. 

Edited by HoustonIsHome
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I'm guessing the developer is overjoyed they chose concrete over wood frame considering lumber prices currently. 

 

Also does anyone live in block 334 or on the red line? It's horn is actually really loud I can hear several blocks away I couldn't imagine living right next to it. 

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1 hour ago, Squirrel said:

I'm guessing the developer is overjoyed they chose concrete over wood frame considering lumber prices currently. 

 

Also does anyone live in block 334 or on the red line? It's horn is actually really loud I can hear several blocks away I couldn't imagine living right next to it. 


It's not so loud, I honestly hear the bell and the train over the track switch in front of the greyhound more. Kinda pleasant to hear honestly, makes me feel like I live in a city :)

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On 9/27/2020 at 3:13 PM, hindesky said:

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I know this Fairfield Residential project is probably going to look very nice in the middle of downtown.  However, that horrible old huge eyesore of a hotel/Days Inn? is still there unimproved, AND the old Exxon tower STILL hasn't been re-clad as has been Shorenstein? Properties' plan for years.  Yeah, I want it all done and now, right LOL! 

 

But, it sure does seem like these two (almost) abandoned remodels are taking much much longer than expected to begin renovations, with no start date in sight.

 

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1 hour ago, Texasota said:

Some of us like the Exxon tower just the way it is, although it would be nice to get it some new tenants.

Agreed, I think it's really beautiful architecturally and historically. Why does everyone want ever building to look the same? 

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2 hours ago, KinkaidAlum said:

I get jealous of Dallas from time to time because they've converted several of their mid-century office towers to residential. I think the Exxon/Humble Tower would make a great apartment tower. Just needs an amenities level somewhere or a nearby garage/amenities facility with skybridge.

I was going to say this.

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20 hours ago, Texasota said:

Some of us like the Exxon tower just the way it is, although it would be nice to get it some new tenants.

 

nope yuk yuk yuk !  too mid-century un-modern for my taste.  and this being HOUSTON after all, it would be great to have it visually more appealing IMHO, perhaps though, another color of glass like bronze or green or something that really pops with some sort of homage to the past look, perhaps at the lower ground level.

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23 hours ago, KinkaidAlum said:

I get jealous of Dallas from time to time because they've converted several of their mid-century office towers to residential. I think the Exxon/Humble Tower would make a great apartment tower. Just needs an amenities level somewhere or a nearby garage/amenities facility with skybridge.

 

They did that because of a moribund downtown office market. We may end up having to do that now, but the reason why we haven't seen much of that yet is because our mid-century office buildings were still viable as offices, which offers higher profits than residential. For Dallas, I can only really think of the old Republic Bank building as having been converted, and then I think they finally started on that one with the wide pinstripes, but I doubt it's finished yet. Then maybe a few smaller ones?

 

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I can think of at least 6-7 residential conversions in downtown Dallas of major towers built between mid 1940s and 1970ish. The Merc with its iconic clock tower is my favorite. The old Exxon has been empty for years. It is not in prime office territory and it cannot compete with newer builds. It's obsolete unless they just want to have a lower class B or even C tower going forward.

 

 

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5 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

They did that because of a moribund downtown office market. We may end up having to do that now, but the reason why we haven't seen much of that yet is because our mid-century office buildings were still viable as offices, which offers higher profits than residential. For Dallas, I can only really think of the old Republic Bank building as having been converted, and then I think they finally started on that one with the wide pinstripes, but I doubt it's finished yet. Then maybe a few smaller ones?

 

 

2 hours ago, KinkaidAlum said:

I can think of at least 6-7 residential conversions in downtown Dallas of major towers built between mid 1940s and 1970ish. The Merc with its iconic clock tower is my favorite. The old Exxon has been empty for years. It is not in prime office territory and it cannot compete with newer builds. It's obsolete unless they just want to have a lower class B or even C tower going forward.

 

 

 

The Statler comes to mind as well. There has definitely been a number of conversions or redevelopments within the past 5 years.

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My apologies, on the "Shell Tower" comment above on October 2nd.  I was mistakenly talking about that hideous OLD outdated in both classical and post modern terms, Humble Oil 45 story tower that has been slated for a facade makeover with glass exterior panels for several years by Shorenstein, I believe.  And I was NOT talking about the beautiful white stone covered 55 story One Shell Plaza tower with the gigantic antenna, which I and everyone I've talked have always loved right in the middle of downtown as you approach from the west.  BTW I think we have enough "homage" to post modernism in our city and therefore, refacing some of these uglier ones from the past is fine with me.  I don't think we'll ever have a shortage of these old buildings around town.  Change is good at the same time that restoration and respect for "examples" of past Houston architecture are also good.  It shouldn't always have to be one or the other IMHO.

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  • The title was changed to Fairfield Block 387: Multifamily In Downtown At 1810 Main St.
  • The title was changed to 1810 Main St. (Block 387): Multifamily by Fairfield Residential

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