Jump to content
s3mh

M•K•T, The Standard in The Heights | 600 N Shepherd Dr

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:

Mods, @Urbannizer @Triton @Subdude @intencity77 @editor

Please add the address back to the title of this thread. Putting the address in the title makes it easy for people to know EXACTLY where this is located, making it easy to plug the address into Google maps or whatever map service versus posting street intersections. Also makes it easier to find when using the search or when searching on Google and easy to find additional information on the property (past and present) when there is an exact address.

Please change the title to include 600 N Shepherd Dr or change it to M•K•T |   600 N Shepherd Dr . It's cleaner looking and includes the name of the development and the address attached to it since this is a complete renovation and adaptive reuse of the Shepherd 10 Business Park at 600 N Shepherd Dr.


I don't understand why certain mods are so hellbent against to adding the address to the title of these projects or even the official names of the projects once they're known.

 

If you resist the urge to make something perfect, although it is very difficult, the urge will gradually diminish for the next thing and then the next thing. But if you act on the urge to make something perfect, then the urge will only be stronger for future things and you will drive yourself into a frenzy trying to perfect everything.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:

Mods, @Urbannizer @Triton @Subdude @intencity77 @editor

Please add the address back to the title of this thread. Putting the address in the title makes it easy for people to know EXACTLY where this is located, making it easy to plug the address into Google maps or whatever map service versus posting street intersections. Also makes it easier to find when using the search or when searching on Google and easy to find additional information on the property (past and present) when there is an exact address.

Please change the title to include 600 N Shepherd Dr or change it to M•K•T |   600 N Shepherd Dr . It's cleaner looking and includes the name of the development and the address attached to it since this is a complete renovation and adaptive reuse of the Shepherd 10 Business Park at 600 N Shepherd Dr.


I don't understand why certain mods are so hellbent against to adding the address to the title of these projects or even the official names of the projects once they're known.

 

So I changed the title but it looks like someone added The Standard in the Heights... isn't that a different development?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Triton said:

 

So I changed the title but it looks like someone added The Standard in the Heights... isn't that a different development?

 

See posts starting from May 23rd on this page.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Urbannizer said:

 

See posts starting from May 23rd on this page.

Thanks! Is it weird that Phase 2 is really kicking off before Phase 1?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Triton said:

Thanks! Is it weird that Phase 2 is really kicking off before Phase 1?

 

I believe the apartments u/c aren't considered as phase II. Triten Real Estate owns the old Swift building, which is rumored to become a boutique hotel once the retail component is complete.

 

https://tritenre.com/projects/swift

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive had design projects that were broken into Phase I and Phase II... and by the time drawings got issued for both, the owner/contractor elected to start with Phase II. 

 

Though in this case, I think @urbannizer is correct. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

If you resist the urge to make something perfect, although it is very difficult, the urge will gradually diminish for the next thing and then the next thing. But if you act on the urge to make something perfect, then the urge will only be stronger for future things and you will drive yourself into a frenzy trying to perfect everything.

 

image.png.f5b2594077a5fbe8ff22b5a5a2e251b2.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

If you resist the urge to make something perfect, although it is very difficult, the urge will gradually diminish for the next thing and then the next thing. But if you act on the urge to make something perfect, then the urge will only be stronger for future things and you will drive yourself into a frenzy trying to perfect everything.

 

 

eed9400369b13d32fd9b15c04f4ebaa8.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/11/2019 at 10:00 AM, H-Town Man said:

 

If you resist the urge to make something perfect, although it is very difficult, the urge will gradually diminish for the next thing and then the next thing. But if you act on the urge to make something perfect, then the urge will only be stronger for future things and you will drive yourself into a frenzy trying to perfect everything.

 

Well this explains Houston perfectly. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wooden wrap apartments continues to get higher, demo of the interior of the warehouses retail area has started.

2p8drGW.jpg

TQUIn45.jpg

VCUvcuf.jpg

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The apartments of phase 2 continue to wrap around the parking garage. A fence has gone up around the MKT project. Harvey is the contractor of phase 2.There is a gap between the 2 projects.

3PgRZ6e.jpg

Ljqrd14.jpg

 

ne3poA8.jpg

imr2lla.jpg

ni2y2LT.jpg

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me or is this flying? Also, its a great sign for this development that in Q3 2019 you have tenants already lining up for a Q2 2020 move when the projected office space hasn't really gotten off the first floor yet, so to speak. Its going to be added pressure to deliver on time. This could also speak to a market that is ready for a development of this sort, since nothing like this is really out there in that area. 

 

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heights mixed-use development announces two new retailers 

  • A rendering of M-K-T, a mixed-use development that Radom Capital and Triten Real Estate Partners are developing.

A rendering of M-K-T, a mixed-use development that Radom Capital and Triten Real Estate Partners are developing.

MICHAEL HSU OFFICE OF ARCHITECTURE

laura-gillespie-1*90xx1000-1333-0-0.png
By Laura Gillespie  – Reporter, Houston Business Journal 
5 hours ago
 

M-K-T, mixed-use project repurposing more than 200,000 square feet of industrial buildings in the Heights, has signed on two additional tenants to add to its growing collection. 

Burdlife will open its first retail location at M-K-T, according to a press release. The 1,193-square-foot space will sell jewelry and statement pieces. The Heights-based company was founded by Natasha Dadwani in 2015. Brett Levinson, assistant vice president with Weitzman, was the broker for Burdlife. Brittney FreedLinda Rubiola and Christie Amezquita with Shop Companies represented the landlord. Although this will be Burdlife's first brick-and-mortar location, the brand has been available in retailers such as Anthropologie. 

Houston-based Elite Meals will also open its first retail location in 1,653 square feet in M-K-T, according to a separate press release. The meal plan service offers meals for ketogenic, paleo and plant-based diets and more, as well as snacks such as bone broth and brownies. Levinson also was the broker for Elite Meals. Prior to this brick-and-mortar location opening in M-K-T, the company offered meals via home delivery or pick-up at its commercial kitchen at 6906 Airline Drive, Suite 108.

Other tenants previously announced, to debut in summer or early fall 2020, include: 

 

M-K-T was designed by acclaimed Austin-based architect Michael Hsuwho recently opened an office in Houston. Houston-based Method Architecture is the architect of record, and SWA Group is the landscape architect. Boston-based Long Wharf Capital LLC is financing the project. Houston-based Radom Capital and Houston-based Triten Real Estate Partners are developing the 12-acre site at North Shepherd Street and 6th and 7th Streets

M-K-T will offer office users modern structures with 10- to 20-foot exposed ceilings that provide the ability to install internal stairwells leading to mezzanine spaces, JLL said previously. Other features include stained concrete floors, exposed beams, private outdoor spaces, and large windows and skylights.

Tenants and guests will have access to a wide array of lifestyle amenities including approximately 100,000 square feet of creative office space and 100,000 square feet of chef-driven restaurants, first-to-market retailers and studio fitness concepts. In all, the development will have space for up to 30 restaurant, retail, and health and fitness businesses, including over 1,000 feet of frontage along the Heights Hike and Bike trail. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Soon there will be no place in the Heights that isn't within walking distance of a boutique ice cream shop.

  • Like 5
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Angostura said:

Soon there will be no place in the Heights that isn't within walking distance of a boutique ice cream shop.

 

ice cream shops are killing it right now apparently. The same thing is happening in Montrose.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More ice cream shops needed in midtown and downtown though

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Purdueenginerd said:

YooVzSA.jpg

 

Quite a bit of activity going on now. cut holes in the tilt walls now

 

They must be using some different tools than the concrete cutting going on at the Sears in Midtown...

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

They must be using some different tools than the concrete cutting going on at the Sears in Midtown...

 

 

If its tilt wall (which is an assumption) then they wouldn't have the problem of all the rebar/ reinforcing nets like at the sears right?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

If its tilt wall (which is an assumption) then they wouldn't have the problem of all the rebar/ reinforcing nets like at the sears right?

 

Not sure, I would think tilt wall has rebar in it as well? I suspect that if someone wanted to make a clean cut then there's a way to do it, rebar or not. The fact that the cuts on the Sears building were so ragged makes me think that all the concrete is going to come off those beams.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Not sure, I would think tilt wall has rebar in it as well? I suspect that if someone wanted to make a clean cut then there's a way to do it, rebar or not. The fact that the cuts on the Sears building were so ragged makes me think that all the concrete is going to come off those beams.

 

 

I have no clue either. The make up of the walls are clearly different. The old wall at the Ion is a cast in place with a lot of rebar and this one seems to be tilt with minimal rebar necessary. I'm working on a job where they did a clean cut on an existing building a long way back where you can see the rebar, and its only a couple decades younger than the old Sears building.

 

I'm wondering if they initially were doing exploratory demo and then just decided to take it down all the way to beam?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 10/7/2019 at 11:34 AM, H-Town Man said:

 

They must be using some different tools than the concrete cutting going on at the Sears in Midtown...

 

 

 

ha, I took a look at the photos of sears. Interesting demo technique. But it should be noted these are quite different structures. Sears appears to be a structural concrete frame. With Sears I'm not sure what their end goal is there, but they may be performing more drastic modifications to the frame system which is precipitating the need to have a more "ugly demo".

 

For this structure, This is definitely tilt-wall. I can't tell if these particular ones are load bearing. (i'll check next time I ride by). But generally the demo procedure is "saw cut" through the wall and push! One good thing this contractor has done is not over cut at the corners of the opening... so kudos to them for doing that. I would expect some sort of steel lintel  to be attached on the inside face/jamb at some point. Generally when I detail post-installed tilt wall openings, I have them install the steel prior to performing demolition.

 

CC @Luminare Tilt walls do have reinforcement, though traditionally less congested then your typical reinforced concrete beam. I've provided a photo from one of my old projects where we repaired a tiltwall. This is the reinforcement that is typical of Tiltwalls. 

 

image.png.0d18a8ff170aae4ce32ca58b8799ab7c.png

 

 

Edited by Purdueenginerd
Typo
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Purdueenginerd said:

 

 

ha, I took a look at the photos of sears. Interesting demo technique. But it should be noted these are quite different structures. Sears appears to be a structural concrete frame. With Sears I'm not sure what their end goal is there, but they may be performing more drastic modifications to the frame system which is precipitating the need to have a more "ugly demo".

 

For this structure, This is definitely tilt-wall. I can't tell if these particular ones are load bearing. (i'll check next time I ride by). But generally the demo procedure is "saw cut" through the wall and push! One good thing this contractor has done is not over cut at the corners of the opening... so kudos to them for doing that. I would expect some sort of steel lintel  to be attached on the inside face/jamb at some point. Generally when I detail post-installed tilt wall openings, I have them install the steel prior to performing demolition.

 

CC @Luminare Tilt walls do have reinforcement, though traditionally less congested then your typical reinforced concrete beam. I've provided a photo from one of my old projects where we repaired a tiltwall. This is the reinforcement that is typical of Tiltwalls. 

 

image.png.0d18a8ff170aae4ce32ca58b8799ab7c.png

 

 

 

This is what I thought, but couldn't prove substantially. That was a quick ninja response!

 

Its been interesting watching the demo because I haven't really seen demo with intent to preserve that intense before. I know on the project I was mentioning above that architecturally if you are going to poke holes into a facade that is concrete then most times it just makes sense to demo the whole wall and refill back in. It is interesting to see how rigid the Sears structure is to be taking such a beating.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
53 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

This is what I thought, but couldn't prove substantially. That was a quick ninja response!

 

Its been interesting watching the demo because I haven't really seen demo with intent to preserve that intense before. I know on the project I was mentioning above that architecturally if you are going to poke holes into a facade that is concrete then most times it just makes sense to demo the whole wall and refill back in. It is interesting to see how rigid the Sears structure is to be taking such a beating.

 

I'll concede that looking at Sears photos, that demo does seem more invasive than I would picture for a renovation project . A few things on Sears Im seeing based on the demo. 

 

It looks like a solid wall was demolished at sears. Other than the lateral system(loads that go left to right, like wind), theres nothing that indicates to me that its part of the gravity system(loads that go down, and hopefully not up). If its part of the lateral system, they're modifiying the lateral system of an existing old building. I'll put this bluntly, doing this sucks, is difficult and expensive and is very invasive to the existing structural systems. Generally on renovation projects youre not required to modify the existing lateral system to modern code provisions unless certain provisions are crossed. Changing a building from Risk Category II to Risk Category III is a good example. Another one is "enlarging" the building wind profile. 
The other thing I noticed at sears is they appear to have completely removed the roof framing. I dont know their end goal here so Im in pure speculation mode. They could be replacing it. Why would use replace it you ask? Roof framing are typically designed for relatively light loads. If the Architect wanted a green roof, or another occupied floor, demoing that roof structure may have precipitated just simply replacing the framing up there. The other item they could be doing is... simply never replacing it. This has the added benefit of reducing the wind profile of the building. Regardless, I think its important to note that whatever they're doing to sears, at least to me, seems significantly larger in scope that this MKT project... as far as demo goes. We also have a secondary portion that here on MKT: the structure is exposed, and will likely remain exposed. Thats less likely for sears. 

 

 

Edited by Purdueenginerd
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duw3g90.jpg

 

 

1 week update. So the tilt walls are clearly load bearing. They've installed shoring, with structural steel (a little surprising) with cribbing down to the slab on grade. Doesnt look tied down for uplift which irks me a little bit, but I digress. It could be theyre planning on performing select demolition at the roof in these locations. 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my industry they use very high pressure water (30,000 - 40,000 lbs of pressure) and a little garnet grit to cut steel plates when there is any trace of explosive/flammable residue, I wonder what they use to cut these concrete slabs so cleanly? Spotted the mock up of the apartments.

Fx7dT6j.jpg

Q9uoGc5.jpg

vjDlvoa.jpg

rliG57j.jpg

faRPxws.jpg

Jxd6fHi.jpg

GxqHHns.jpg

mqjIrxo.jpg

 

 

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...