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M•K•T, The Standard in The Heights | 600 N Shepherd Dr

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17 hours ago, Purdueenginerd said:

The architect isnt making the structural engineer's life easy on this one. Tilt Wall construction like that and it looks like theyre cutting huge holes in it and significantly altering building profiles. I get the feeling this might be scaled back significantly once it gets to the DD issue of the drawings. Neat complex though

 

If there is a significant steel structure like they are showing, then this probably isn't a tilt wall complex don't you think? (as an architect asking an engineer). From the renderings its possible that they will strip the building to the bear structure (which in this market will save millions on steel costs) and just redo the envelope and roof. Thats just from a first pass at looking at this.

 

EDIT: Upon doing a second pass and then looking at the original building, this looks like a steel structure with precast aggregate concrete panels for the exterior. I'm just not convinced this is tilt wall. Could be wrong though.

Edited by Luminare

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Houston Chronicle wrote two articles yesterday on  M·K·T the site of Shepherd 10 Business Park, 600 N Shepherd Dr @ W 6th St and W 7th St in Houston.

Here is the link to one of them. It's paraphrasing the press release and has the exact information as the Houston Business Journal article from the day before:
https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Heights-developers-embark-on-12-acre-retail-and-13398311.php



Here is the second one with more details and an interview with the developers:



How M·K·T was born:
 

It didn’t take long for Houston developers Steve Radom and Scott Arnoldy to realize they share a similar vision about preserving old buildings, even if the buildings are unremarkable warehouses from the 1970s. Most any other developer would promptly call in the wrecking ball.

Radom, who built Heights Mercantile , the eclectic shopping district fashioned out of a collection of old structures and new ones, called Arnoldy when he learned that the fellow developer was buying an industrial park at the northeast intersection of North Shepherd and 6th Street that he had also long admired.

“We hit it off on about every level you could,” recalled Arnoldy, managing partner of Triten Real Estate Partners. “I eventually just said, ‘Why don’t you just come in and do it with us.’”

That was the beginning of project called M-K-T, which will transform a 12-acre site into 200,000 square feet of high-end offices, shopping, restaurants and a fitness complex. Triten and Radom’s company, Radom Capital, are seeking tenants.





On the construction and design:
 

The five industrial buildings on the property will be redesigned and repurposed — and in some cases, deconstructed — as a walkable development that also will include parks, public art and “abundant bicycle parking,” the developers said. The property’s location is along the Heights Hike and Bike Trail. The White Oak Bayou Trail is south of the property.

Slated for an early 2020 completion, the development will be split equally between office and retail space. The architects are Michael Hsu Office of Architecture and SWA Group. Method Architecture is also involved.

Radom said the new design peels away the flat, monolithic facades of the warehouses. Some of the buildings may be gutted, leaving their joists exposed to create plazas or space for parking.

“The landscape design for M-K-T preserves yet enhances the historic Houston Heights character,” Kinder Baumgartner, Principal at SWA Group, said in a statement. “We complemented the design with new greenspaces, native plantings and community seating opportunities.”

 




Cost and expected start of construction:
 

Radom and Arnoldy declined to disclose their investment in the property and the estimated development cost other than saying it would be tens of millions of dollars. The project has financial backing from Long Wharf Capital LLC, a Boston private equity firm.

Construction is expected to start by the middle of next year after the last tenants move out. All of the leases contained clauses that tenants may have to relocate if the property changed hands. The seller had owned the property since the early 1990s. The deal closed in May.

The developers said they intend to lease space to local and first-to-market tenants, similar to the approach at Radom’s Heights Mercantile, which includes Warby Parker, Local Foods, Postino Wine Cafe and Aesop.



https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Heights-warehouses-to-see-new-life-as-urban-13400147.php


 

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On 11/16/2018 at 1:38 PM, Luminare said:

 

If there is a significant steel structure like they are showing, then this probably isn't a tilt wall complex don't you think? (as an architect asking an engineer). From the renderings its possible that they will strip the building to the bear structure (which in this market will save millions on steel costs) and just redo the envelope and roof. Thats just from a first pass at looking at this.

 

EDIT: Upon doing a second pass and then looking at the original building, this looks like a steel structure with precast aggregate concrete panels for the exterior. I'm just not convinced this is tilt wall. Could be wrong though.

 

I could be wrong as well as I have not seen the interior framing. But if I had to guess, I would opine that its steel frame for the center columns and beams to support the roof bar joists however the exterior perimeter appears to me to me tilt wall with a decorative finish. That tilt wall is likely supporting the other side of the bar joists. Those exposed aggregate tilt wall buildings were really popular in the 70's and 80's. Link below with some construction details on how theyre built.

 

https://www.concreteconstruction.net/how-to/tilt-up-exposed-aggregate_o

 

I pulled an image from 1978 from when the complex was under construction. Pretty hard to tell but it looks like the walls are up and theres no roof on the building(the Center building) yet which is consistent with tilt-wall construction.

 

 

 

 

1978.png

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Related, I love/hate how Google Maps takes the MKT Trail and interprets it as "Market Trail". Same how sometimes "West Road" becomes "W Rd". Robots aren't beating that CAPTCHA soon.

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Related, I love/hate how Google Maps takes the MKT Trail and interprets it as "Market Trail". Same how sometimes "West Road" becomes "W Rd". Robots aren't beating that CAPTCHA soon.

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On 11/16/2018 at 1:49 PM, s3mh said:

I would not want to own a house on Waverly between 11th and this development.  Waverly is going to end up being the street to access this development from the north.  They really should build 6th street to go all the way through, but pylons for a bridge over the retention pond would displace too much water and require them to dig deeper into the very contaminated soil.  But I bet a bridge over the retention pond would be a great home for bats.

 

 

 

 

Access to this site is tricky for anyone actually coming from the Heights (by car). 

 

If Shepherd/Durham weren't the functional equivalent of an 8-lane highway running through the neighborhood, but were instead a pair of 3-lane two-way streets, it wouldn't be as much of a problem.

 

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Loopnet listing is up for The M·K·T or M-K-T.
This is the site of the Shepherd 10 Business Park, 600 N Shepherd Dr @ W 6th St and W 7th St in Houston.


The M-K-T is the transformation of 12 acres in Houston’s urban core into an active, bike-trail-facing destination for fitness, retail, restaurants and creative office. The project has 1,000 linear feet of frontage on the Heights hike & bike trail (formerly the M-K-T rail line) as well as easy access to Shepherd Drive, I-10, and the Heights neighborhood. The existing industrial structures will be deconstructed and reinvented as art-forward, modern buildings linked by green pathways and a several-acre park. Delivery late 2019.


https://www.loopnet.com/listing/600-n-shepherd-dr-houston-tx/14398730/
https://web.archive.org/web/20181206140445/https://www.loopnet.com/listing/600-n-shepherd-dr-houston-tx/14398730/   (archive link)

Edited by CrockpotandGravel

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Rendering and site map from Loopnet listing of The M·K·T or The M-K-T.
This is the site of the Shepherd 10 Business Park, 600 N Shepherd Dr @ W 6th St and W 7th St in Houston.


https://www.loopnet.com/xNet/Looplink/TmplEngine/ListingProfilePage.aspx?LID=14398730&siteid=3349&LL=true



The  M-K-T Bldg 4 and Bldg 5 Rendering
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The M-K-T Bldg 4
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The M-K-T Bldg 4 Evening Rendering
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The M-K-T Bldg 1 Plaza Rendering
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Edited by CrockpotandGravel

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Love the "BUY" and "NOSH" signs-as-imperatives in the Bldg 4 rendering. If this is an emerging trend for design placeholders, I look forward to "CONSUME" and "OBEY" in future renderings. 

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Before the Shepherd 10 Business Park was built, the site was used for low income housing. There were several two story structures, of the post WWII barracks style construction. I'm sure the lower Heights residents were glad to see them go at the time. Now we a ready for the next use of this land. MKT looks like a good fit for this site, however it appears hard to get in and out of.

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On 12/21/2018 at 6:14 PM, plumber2 said:

however it appears hard to get in and out of.

 

This is true, but easily solved: re-stripe both Shepherd and Durham from 4-lane, one-way to 3-lane, two-way, so instead of having an 8-lane highway running through the neighborhood, we have two functional commercial streets.

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7 hours ago, Angostura said:

 

This is true, but easily solved: re-stripe both Shepherd and Durham from 4-lane, one-way to 3-lane, two-way, so instead of having an 8-lane highway running through the neighborhood, we have two functional commercial streets.

Oh, hell no. That's honestly one of the stupidest ideas I've heard in a long time. Shepherd and Durham work fine as they are. You are suggesting cutting the travel lanes in half, which would result in massive traffic jams and backups trying to get out of the businesses on those streets. And, that's ignoring the costs to redo the traffic signals on both streets, and making the merge North of 610 work.

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47 minutes ago, Ross said:

Oh, hell no. That's honestly one of the stupidest ideas I've heard in a long time. Shepherd and Durham work fine as they are. You are suggesting cutting the travel lanes in half, which would result in massive traffic jams and backups trying to get out of the businesses on those streets. And, that's ignoring the costs to redo the traffic signals on both streets, and making the merge North of 610 work.

 

Shep and Durham work OK if you're in a car. They kind of suck if you're not.

 

3-lane 2-way streets have almost the same carrying capacity as 4-lane 2-way streets, since they handle left turns more efficiently. (They're also a lot safer.)  Shepherd and Durham between 11th and 20th both carry less traffic than (3-lane) Studewood between 11th and White Oak. A 3-lane configuration would reduce travel speeds to a safer level, discourage cut-through traffic, and allow space for wider sidewalks or bike lanes. Reducing average travel speeds from 40 mph to 25 mph along this corridor would add all of 2 minutes to a trip from I-10 to 610.

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The city is already planning to put in bike lanes on Shepherd and Durham. I don't know if they're planning on taking a car lane from each street or what, but even just taking each street down the 3 lanes would help.

 

The other thing that would really help? Lights at 10th, 12th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, and 30th streets. The biggest problem with this couplet is how difficult it is to cross.

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2 hours ago, Texasota said:

The city is already planning to put in bike lanes on Shepherd and Durham. I don't know if they're planning on taking a car lane from each street or what, but even just taking each street down the 3 lanes would help.

 

The other thing that would really help? Lights at 10th, 12th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, and 30th streets. The biggest problem with this couplet is how difficult it is to cross.

If they add that many lights I can guarantee there will be at least one less car that ever goes down either street ;)

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15 hours ago, Texasota said:

The city is already planning to put in bike lanes on Shepherd and Durham. I don't know if they're planning on taking a car lane from each street or what, but even just taking each street down the 3 lanes would help.

 

The other thing that would really help? Lights at 10th, 12th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, and 30th streets. The biggest problem with this couplet is how difficult it is to cross.

 

It's hard to cross because there are four lanes of one-way traffic, and the road design encourages people to drive way faster than the 35 mph speed limit. You're crossing what is effectively an 8-lane divided highway.

 

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Sort of. Except there's an enormous median with grocery stores and stuff in the middle.

 

Don't get me wrong; I would love to see the number of car travel lanes cut down. I just think (regarding the road design) that a huge part of the problem is the distance between stop lights. People speed because the street is so wide AND because there's no reason to stop. 

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20 hours ago, Angostura said:

 

Shep and Durham work OK if you're in a car. They kind of suck if you're not.

 

3-lane 2-way streets have almost the same carrying capacity as 4-lane 2-way streets, since they handle left turns more efficiently. (They're also a lot safer.)  Shepherd and Durham between 11th and 20th both carry less traffic than (3-lane) Studewood between 11th and White Oak. A 3-lane configuration would reduce travel speeds to a safer level, discourage cut-through traffic, and allow space for wider sidewalks or bike lanes. Reducing average travel speeds from 40 mph to 25 mph along this corridor would add all of 2 minutes to a trip from I-10 to 610.

 

According to the City of Houston Traffic Counts site, Shepherd between 11th and 20th carried 10,000 more cars per day than Studewood between 11th and White Oak. If you are biking, there are better streets than Shepherd and Durham a couple of blocks to the East. You would be insane to bike on Shepherd and Durham until the City gets around to redoing the pavement.

 

Right turns will back up the one lane and a turn lane you propose, since people can't seem to make a right turn without stopping in the middle of the turn.

 

1 hour ago, Texasota said:

Sort of. Except there's an enormous median with grocery stores and stuff in the middle.

 

Don't get me wrong; I would love to see the number of car travel lanes cut down. I just think (regarding the road design) that a huge part of the problem is the distance between stop lights. People speed because the street is so wide AND because there's no reason to stop. 

A light at 10th would be stupid. A better choice there would be an island that forces people to turn right from 10th onto Shepherd, not allowing them to cross over to Merchants Park and the stores. Otherwise, there are plenty of lights between 11th and 610. 

 

I spend more time driving on Shepherd and Durham than any other streets, and would hate to see any reductions in traffic flow.

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20 minutes ago, Ross said:

 

According to the City of Houston Traffic Counts site, Shepherd between 11th and 20th carried 10,000 more cars per day than Studewood between 11th and White Oak.

 

Studewood @ 8th: 19,632. Shepherd @ 14th: 18,654. Studewood DOES see fewer cars north of 11th, but the point is that a 3-lane road configuration can carry similar levels of traffic to what Shepherd currently carries, and do so with much higher levels of pedestrian safety.

 

 

20 minutes ago, Ross said:

 

If you are biking, there are better streets than Shepherd and Durham a couple of blocks to the East.

 

Unless your destination is on Shepherd. Within a few years, Shepherd will have transformed into a series of used car lots into a pretty dense commercial (and residential) district. It has a better chance of thriving if people can navigate this area safely.

 

BTW, CoH will never make this change, because we value moving cars efficiently more than we value not killing pedestrians. I'm just trying to move the Overton window a little. (Though, one way to avoid killing pedestrians is to do everything possible to ensure we never have any.) 

 

 

26 minutes ago, Ross said:

 

You would be insane to bike on Shepherd and Durham until the City gets around to redoing the pavement.

 

On this, we agree.

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Eh, I've actually biked more than a few times on Shepherd and (with a group) it can actually be pretty nice. Traffic gets pretty light north of I-10 at various times of day and you can easily take a whole, excessively wide lane quite comfortably.

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36 minutes ago, Angostura said:

 

Studewood @ 8th: 19,632. Shepherd @ 14th: 18,654. Studewood DOES see fewer cars north of 11th, but the point is that a 3-lane road configuration can carry similar levels of traffic to what Shepherd currently carries, and do so with much higher levels of pedestrian safety.

 

Extracted today from the CoH site, averages for the year:

 

STREET NAME SEGMENT ADT YEAR
SHEPHERD N DURHAM TO W 34TH ST 47227 2018
SHEPHERD N KATY FWY TO W 11TH ST 34958 2018
SHEPHERD N KATY FWY TO W 11TH ST 33958 2018
SHEPHERD N LITTLE YORK TO NORTH FWY 20167 2018
SHEPHERD N PARKER TO LITTLE YORK 35175 2018
SHEPHERD N PINEMONT TO TIDWELL 31605 2018
SHEPHERD N TIDWELL TO W MONTGOMERY 30899 2018
SHEPHERD N W 11TH ST TO W 20TH ST 25355 2018
SHEPHERD N W 34TH ST TO W 43RD ST 46498 2018
SHEPHERD N W 34TH ST TO W 43RD ST 46498 2018
SHEPHERD N W 43RD ST TO PINEMONT 41366 2018
SHEPHERD N W MONTGOMERY TO PARKER 34891 2018
       
STUDEWOOD KATY FWY TO WHITE OAK 16654 2018
STUDEWOOD W 11TH ST TO N MAIN 9091 2018
STUDEWOOD WHITE OAK TO W 11TH ST 15158 2018

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http://www.housingforhouston.com/media/54608/august 2018 board packet.pdf

 

The southern half of this property that is currently being prepped for construction is going to be the Standard in the Heights.  51% of the units will be reserved for low and moderate income residents.  This is in the Love Elementary school zone.  Love is chronically under enrolled.  So, no Briargrove freak out will happen with this project.   

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Looks a little project-y. Just a little, though.

 

This is becoming an interesting little area. Michael Hsu is design the redevelopment of the warehouse on Shepherd at the hike and bike trail. He also did Heights Revival to the east. It might make sense to connect 6th Street through the retention pond at some point. Then the last couple warehouses at 6th and Waverley could give way to something with a little height (considering the views), maybe a mixed residential and office development.

 

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I didn't see a drawing--only a photo of an existing HHA project used as artwork on the Report Cover. Is there a rendering? I would assume this would be a dense mid-rise or something similar like the one planned in Uptown a few years back.

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The website for The M•K•T was updated last month.

 

 

On restaurants: 

m•k•t will feature 6 thoughtfully-selected dining destinations, including first-to-market national concepts along with locally inspired restaurants.

 

On office spaces:

m•k•t caters to office needs from 2,000 to 50,000 sq ft, accommodating a variety of spaces ideal for creative, collaborative businesses.

Mezzanine-style lofted spaces, 26ft ceiling, and large windows overlooking the trail create a home for inspiration & innovation.

 

On retail:

m•k•t combines the area's affinity for unique and independent retail with thoughtful architecture, walkability, and green space.

 

 

Trail Oriented

Linking the m•k•t trail with creative opportunity.

m•k•t is named after the historic Missouri-Kansas-Texas (MKT) railroad line. This abandoned rail line was transformed into the vibrant MKT Heights Hike and Bike Trail that will form the project's 3-acre linear park.

 

m•k•t sits at the epicenter of Houston's award-winning trail system, linking 150-miles of greenways and trails. Ridership on the MKT Heights Trail has increased significantly and continues to grow as the trail network is further expanded.

The trail-oriented nature of the project makes it the ideal places for urbanites to thrive. Passers-by can immerse themselves avant-garde chefs, artists and merchants with quality retail, unique dining and drinking experiences.

 

 

 

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https://tritenre.com/projects/swift

 

Triten Real Estate Partners purchased over four acres of land and three original buildings the Heights neighborhood of Houston. The buildings, first constructed in 1909, were formerly a meat packing and distribution facility for Swift & Company. The Swift site is immediately adjacent to Triten’s m-k-t Heights project and gives Triten 16.5 contiguous acres and over 2,000 linear feet of frontage along the Heights Hike and Bike Trail.

 

DJI_0230.jpg?crop=focalpoint&fit=crop&fp

 

DSC07827.jpg?fit=clip&h=1200&q=80&w=1680

 

DSC07838.jpg?fit=clip&h=1200&q=80&w=1680

 

DSC07839.jpg?fit=clip&h=1200&q=80&w=1680

 

DSC07886.jpg?fit=clip&h=1200&q=80&w=1680

 

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Just noticed that John Deal's company acquired 600 W 6th back in 2015.  

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On 3/2/2019 at 11:18 AM, CrockpotandGravel said:

 

On restaurants: 

m•k•t will feature 6 thoughtfully-selected dining destinations, including first-to-market national concepts along with locally inspired restaurants.



I noticed in the brochure for M•K•T, the development near the Heights in Houston, the number of restaurants is different than what's on the website.


From the brochure linked in posts above:
m•k•t will feature 8 thoughtfully-selected food and beverage destinations including first-to-market national concepts paired with locally-inspired, chef-driven restaurants.


And on the website:
Six on-site food and beverage options. 

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This was published in December on the conversion of office spaces at the site of Shepherd 10 Business Park. This is being transformed into  M•K•T, located at 600 N Shepherd Dr at W 6th St in Houston.
 
From Globe St.


 

Houston-based Triten Real Estate Partners’ recently announced Heights adaptive reuse project, M.K.T., will provide an infusion of creative office space for which there is growing demand but little available inventory in Houston. M.K.T. is located at the southeast corner of North Shepherd Drive and the Heights Hike and Bike Trail.
 

The project will convert five dock-high industrial buildings into an urban district that will include 100,000 square feet of office space and 100,000 square feet of curated retail. Triten selected JLL to lease all of the creative office space.
 

“Houston lags both coasts with respect to creative office offerings,” said JLL’s Russell Hodges, who along with Bubba Harkins will lease the office component on behalf of Triten Real Estate Partners. “There is significant demand for this product type starting to come from traditional office users as companies seek to differentiate themselves through real estate to compete for top talent.”
 

The office component will provide customizable spaces ranging from 2,000 to 40,000 square feet and will cater to more open-concept users. Certain tenant spaces will allow for the addition of skylights, private restrooms within the space and the possibility for private outdoor terraces along the Heights Hike and Bike trail. The buildings’ original use as warehouse space will give tenants the flexibility to incorporate aspects of the original design into the office space. For instance, 24-foot ceiling heights leave room for interior loft or mezzanine spaces that are typically not feasible in traditional office buildings.
 

“Tenants across industries are looking for the unique elements of creative space to build their brand and recruit the next generation of talent,” Hodges tells GlobeSt.com. “Nationally, we’re seeing creative office space command premium rents, experience fast lease up and fetch record-high disposition pricing. Yet, it’s an underserved niche in Houston. M.K.T. will provide a much-needed infusion of creative office space to the Houston market and is an indication of the type of product we can expect to see more of.”

Indeed, M.K.T. is expected to attract technology, arts, media and professional services office tenants that align with the independent spirit of the Heights. The project is expected to be ready for occupancy the first quarter of 2020.
 

Austin-based Michael Hsu Office of Architecture and Houston-based Method Architecture are providing design services on the project. SWA Group is the landscape architect on the project.
 

Triten is developing the mixed-use destination in partnership with Houston-based Radom Capital and Boston-based Long Wharf Capital. The project pays homage to the site’s history and its name is an abbreviation for the Missouri-Kansas-Texas railroad that originally ran through the Heights.
 

“With every project, you need to let your plans be informed by the legacy of the neighborhood and what it needs today,” said Scott Arnoldy, founder and managing principal at Triten Real Estate Partners. “We plan to weave features of the existing buildings into the modern structures and use the history of the neighborhood to develop a hallmark lifestyle destination for the community. The finished product will be a cultural and community amenity that will grow, evolve and improve with the neighborhood for years to come.”
 

The heavily traveled Heights Hike and Bike Trail serves as the northern border of the project. Catering to pedestrians and cyclists, the project will have 1,700 feet of frontage on the Heights Hike and Bike trail, which sees more than 12,000 users a month. The project will include an urban boardwalk along the path with a series of terraces, patios and outdoor dining, open lawns for yoga and games, a hammock grove, and art installations.
 

One block south of the project, the White Oak Bayou Greenway Trail winds from 34th Street and T.C. Jester Blvd. to the northern edge of downtown, where it connects to miles of other trails.
 

While it is clear that the market is beginning the early stages of stabilizing, undoing more than 7 million square feet of occupancy losses and a near doubling of the vacancy rate will not happen overnight, JLL points out in its third quarter office report. Positive net absorption and a drop in vacancy in the third quarter was certainly a step in the right direction, but many more quarters of sustained growth are necessary before the market returns to a more balanced state. As such, Houston market conditions are expected to remain tenant favorable through the remainder of 2018 and well into 2019 at least, JLL predicts.


https://www.globest.com/2018/12/05/creative-office-infusion-looks-to-tackle-demand
 

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That building would make an excellent techno club. Come on Houston lets make our own version of Berghain!

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Living in central Austin, with my heart in Houston, I so desperately want to see a bigger version of graffiti park in Houston. Seeing this building makes me dream of it

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45 minutes ago, HoustonBoy said:

Living in central Austin, with my heart in Houston, I so desperately want to see a bigger version of graffiti park in Houston. Seeing this building makes me dream of it

 

The Silos out in 5th Ward has a lot of potential to be that + a great venue. Went to an event out there not long ago, and was like....Wow I had no idea we had something like that here. This space too has the potential to be that as well.

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8 hours ago, Luminare said:

 

The Silos out in 5th Ward has a lot of potential to be that + a great venue. Went to an event out there not long ago, and was like....Wow I had no idea we had something like that here. This space too has the potential to be that as well.

 

The Silos are a trip and a half. Used to know a guy who's parents owned it. 

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At one point (not sure if this is still the case), this owner planned to re-purpose this as a boutique hotel. 

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I did a video shoot at The Silos a couple of months ago. I felt like I was in a Mad Max dystopian world... lol

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