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Could Ferguson MO happen here?

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Probably not. Remember, Houston never had the race riot problems like so many other cities did, partially because it integrated early for the purposes of business. Here's a bit of an article quoting one William Lawson, an 85-year-old African American preacher for the Rose of Sharon Baptist Church in Freedmen's Town:

 

The reason Houston escaped big race riots, Lawson says, was not black or white but green: “Houston was not Klan-oriented, Houston was money-oriented.” City leaders met upstairs at the Rice Hotel downtown and agreed that the new Astrodome, space center, and other innovations were attracting big businesses to Houston, but “if we have Birmingham [racial conflict] in Houston, that’s gone.” They agreed that all businesses would “quietly desegregate. All the department stores would simply let customers come in and try on clothes. All the restaurants would just open their doors and people could just come in. They would take down the ‘white’ and ‘colored’ signs off of buses and drinking fountains.”

%5Bsource%5D

Edited by IronTiger
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Bingo IronTiger! Exactly what I was going to say. Good business has always helped to mitigate tensions in the past and with the migration of more Oil companies, HQ relocations, and a possible rise in Aerospace....i don't think it would be in the cities best interest to get to the position to have race riots. Of course lets not be naive and say that racial separation of territory hasn't happened in here. Even deep separation by social standing and money, but I think our city is so diverse that it will continue to shift around and get better.

 

Also I don't know if we have idiots in HPD that shot guys 6 times even if they were charging at them.

 

Finally, it really depends on if the media makes it an issue. One of the biggest crimes to have gone on in all of this is news networks making this into a national issue when it isn't. It's incredibly localized and should only be a state issue at the highest. Sending Eric Holder down there isn't going to do a darn thing. This isn't something where you look at this and say 'what does this say about america' or crap like that. If anything it says that people will exploit a situation such as this to get any kind of gains possible. From the people rioting just so they could loot stuff, to journalist looking to make this into the next 1960's riots, and to further alienate people to the fact that as a nation we have made significant strides as far as equality and continue to do so more than any other country in the world.

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Houston certainly has race problems, but not the same kind of police problems.

 

If you look at how the Mayor has handled mass protests, her methods have been far more effective than other cities. Other cities like Oakland tried to confront groups like Occupy rather than just manage them. Our Mayor told them they could stay in the park as long as they followed certain rules (no tents, for example). The group mostly fizzled out on its own here with very little violence or arrests. 

 

When Quanell X's group marched onto 288 and shut it down, the police managed to resolve it without resorting to violence. These cops are clearly under orders to work with these groups and resolve conflicts non-violently whenever possible.

 

When police resort to unnecessary violence (as in Occupy Oakland, Occupy New York, Ferguson, etc.) the people strengthen their resolve. 

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Of course it could.  Though it is my understanding that Furgeson has seen issues similar to (perhaps not as big) as this in the past few decades.  So the community is somewhat used to police trouble... if that's the right word.  Honestly if the Open Carry people had held their "meet-up" in the 5th Ward then we might have seen some really big issues erupt from that.

 

I do find the over militarization of the police (using swat teams to serve warrents for minor offenses to non-violent people for starters) a HUGE problem in the coming years.  The police, and defense contractors supplying them won't give up on getting/having these new, high powered weapons and vehicles.  Frankly only the military and major swat teams in big cities need high-tech equipement such as we're seeing everywhere.

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Houston has certainly had its problems over time; granted, not as big as Birmingham, Watts, etc., but still they occurred.  I hit teh Googelz, and one of the very first hits was http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/10563-infamous-riots-in-our-city/ , largely about the 1967 TSU riot.  Some contributors to that thread still post here.  I also found some materials on the Moody Park riot in 1978 here and here.  I was in grad school here at the time, and those two articles pretty closely follow my recollection, though they omit mention that Phil Archer and Jack Cato, Channel 2 guys at the time, both got stabbed; Cato quite seriously.

 

huge difference is the contrast between HPD then and now.  I'm certainly not saying that the department is perfect now, but at least it's no longer being run by our very own local version of Bull Connor, nor has it been for quite some time.  What does disturb me, though, is the militarization and "bad azzing" of the force, even down to such subliminal things as black shirts and cars rather than blue.

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The change in car color is due to Ford only providing that color, and HPD's lack of desire to spend money repainting.

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I'm pretty sure Ford, Chevy, and Chrysler are all still making white cars.  HPD vehicles have been white for quite some time with the blue being in the form of applied decal stripes.

 

I'm also pretty sure that the supply of blue dye for shirts has not vanished.   :ph34r:

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Moody Park Riot

I worked in an office downtown in the summer of 1978 when the Moody Park riot happened, and I was sharing a cubicle with a young hispanic girl. Being sensitive, I asked her what she thought of the riot and her repsonse was "Stupid Mexicans". I never brought it up again.

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Houston has certainly had its problems over time; granted, not as big as Birmingham, Watts, etc., but still they occurred.  I hit teh Googelz, and one of the very first hits was http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/10563-infamous-riots-in-our-city/ , largely about the 1967 TSU riot.  Some contributors to that thread still post here.  I also found some materials on the Moody Park riot in 1978 here and here.  I was in grad school here at the time, and those two articles pretty closely follow my recollection, though they omit mention that Phil Archer and Jack Cato, Channel 2 guys at the time, both got stabbed; Cato quite seriously.

 

huge difference is the contrast between HPD then and now.  I'm certainly not saying that the department is perfect now, but at least it's no longer being run by our very own local version of Bull Connor, nor has it been for quite some time.  What does disturb me, though, is the militarization and "bad azzing" of the force, even down to such subliminal things as black shirts and cars rather than blue.

 

And don't forget the riots that erupted after Houston Police assaulted a black soldier based out of Camp Logan. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston_Riot_(1917)

 

But you're exactly right. We still have plenty of bad apples in HPD, but the difference now is that on an institutional level the officers clearly seem to be under orders to clean up their act and not escalate an encounter whenever possible.

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There's been a huge change in HPD from even the 1990s.

 

I remember attending a pro-choice rally in 1992 at the Republican Convention near the Astrodome. Across the street, a group of ACT-UP AIDS protestors were doing their thing but without a permit (side bar, since when did protests start requiring permits in public spaces?). Out of nowhere came a cavalry of mounted HPD officers who rode into the ACT UP folks with clubs swinging. I watched in horror as a few people got their heads bashed in with NO warning. It was truly gruesome. I doubt that would happen today but it was sadly not surprising back then.

 

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http://www.houstonchronicle.com/local/gray-matters/article/Old-revolutionaries-never-die-They-go-to-5704374.php#/0

 

 

Various sources report that among those arrested in Ferguson, Mo., this week is one Travis Morales, a Brooklyn-based representative of the Revolutionary Communist Party.

Does the name seem familiar?

 

It's the same Travis Morales of the Revolutionary Communist Party prominent in Houston's own history of police-related riots. Morales, a Rice student, was charged with inciting "felony riot" related to the the 1978 Moody Park Riot.

 

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^That is always a problem.  Outsiders coming in either with their own agenda, or thinking that they are helping locals and distorting things to such an extent that its harmful.

 

As for the police.... I find the militarization very alarming!  I've said it before, and I'm reiterating it.  Someone needs to remind police forces they are here to serve and protect.  Protecting the innocent does not include intimidation.  Frankly, I think Law Enforcement officers need more training on top of what is required.  I'd also like to see all police forces make more of an effort to address the fact these men/women are here to serve the communities they're hired to work in.

 

Defense contractors have gotten into bed with the Pentagon and convinced them to sell military grade weapons and hardware to people who probably only need a service revolver (in 99.9999999% of all cases where they require deadly force).  Of course a .48 special isn't really cool looking like an AR-15 with red-dot scope and pistol grips etc.

 

And I'll never understand this "brothers in arms" nonsense.  Military guys/gals are different.  Serving in a war is a far cry from walking a beat!  That's for damn sure.

Edited by arche_757
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If the people of Ferguson want justice I have one word of advice for them:

 

Vote.

I agree. I kept hearing the media state the racial inequity on the city council, and school boards. The only way that happens is through apathy and by not voting. The national media left statements open ended like the inequities were the result of some type of appointment from the state level that caused this. Shame on the media for pointing it out like that, and shame on the residents for allowing it to happen.

Edited by plumber2
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I'm not sure how an unemotional thinking black city representative changes things much. Color should not cloud someone's judgement. That's why lady justice wears a blind fold.

To answer the OPs question, this can happen anywhere people rush to judgement without evidence, facts, and the complete story. If injustice is made after that, I could understand a little more. But to make a decision before that is unwise.

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If the people of Ferguson want justice I have one word of advice for them:

 

Vote.

 

That could be the solution, because they don't. Among black residents, a single digit turnout in the last municipal election. Why? I'm afraid that having everybody voting is not a popular option in some quarters.  For example, http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/08/18/Missouri-GOP-Michael-Brown-Voting-Registration-Booths-Disgusting.  Also, http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/08/18/1322606/-Ferguson-s-election-turnout-is-terrible-by-design-Here-s-how-to-fix-it#.

 

I'm not sure how an unemotional thinking black city representative changes things much. Color should not cloud someone's judgement. That's why lady justice wears a blind fold.

To answer the OPs question, this can happen anywhere people rush to judgement without evidence, facts, and the complete story. If injustice is made after that, I could understand a little more. But to make a decision before that is unwise.

 

I agree that an unthinking city representative won't change much, whether black, brown, white, or plaid. 

 

Likewise, color shouldn't cloud someone's judgment, but let's get real here. It does.  

 

Missouri's history is different from the rest of the Midwest. It was truly a "border state." Slavery was legal. It (and Kentucky) joined the CSA without seceding. And the southern part of Missouri has more in common with Arkansas than it does with northern Missouri, much less Iowa. 

 

I'm from here, lived in Louisiana for a couple years during the long hot summers, and have plenty of kin in Louisiana and Arkansas. But I didn't see what bigotry was really like, up close and personal, until I went to Springfield, MO for college. Shoot, some of those nimrods don't even like to be around Catholics (such as my college room mate's mother, who blurted out "but... but... you're so NICE!?!?!" when she found out, just weeks before graduation, that I was raised in the arms of Holy Mother The Church).

 

And that's how someone gets a summary death penalty for jaywalking.

Edited by mollusk
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AMEN, mollusk.

 

I've been laughing for a week now as my right wing friends talk about "it's their fault cause they don't vote" while ignoring the putrid 17% white voter turnout. I also think people often ignore another key reason some people don't vote... Voting takes place on workdays and usually during work hours. If you work at Burger King, do you think your boss is going to give you time off to vote? What if you don't have a car? What if you don't have a driver's license? What if, due to poverty, you move a lot (poor people tend to move a lot more than wealthy folks) and forgot to update your voter registration? 

 

 

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I'll choose to withhold my opinions on the matter until the real story is made clear. After all, the Trayvon Martin case was widely mis-reported, so I have reason to believe there's a part of the story not being told.

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AMEN, mollusk.

 

I've been laughing for a week now as my right wing friends talk about "it's their fault cause they don't vote" while ignoring the putrid 17% white voter turnout. I also think people often ignore another key reason some people don't vote... Voting takes place on workdays and usually during work hours. If you work at Burger King, do you think your boss is going to give you time off to vote? What if you don't have a car? What if you don't have a driver's license? What if, due to poverty, you move a lot (poor people tend to move a lot more than wealthy folks) and forgot to update your voter registration? 

 

Yes, but you still have to make the effort, even if you're poor and transient. It's the only way they are going to break the current jerrymandered control of the local government office holders.

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I agree. I always vote but I can see why more and more people fail to. 

 

As for the misinformation in the Treyvon case, what in the world are you talking about? 

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As for the misinformation in the Treyvon case, what in the world are you talking about?

Doctored 911 call audio released, misleading photos for the initial presentation of what happened, trying to spin it into a racial conflict from the get-go, etc.

Nevertheless, Ferguson is a different thing (and has, apparently, some real issues), so despite my jaded cynicism, am willing to give the news media the benefit of the doubt and not immediately attack them on mishandling the truth until that is proven or disproven. Only then will take a side in the issue.

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I agree. I always vote but I can see why more and more people fail to.

As for the misinformation in the Treyvon case, what in the world are you talking about?

Like all big stories like this and shootings etc, false information was initially reported and the facts sometimes don't come out until the trial. People run with misinformation and use it to support their case like the crowd immediately after the second killing in St. Louis this week. People yelling "hands up" when they don't even know a thing, then the video comes and shows the kid was totally in the wrong and had a knife walking towards the cops yelling "shoot me."

The these same people either don't bother to find out the truth or suppress it, or maybe they just want to stay in their ignorance bc of an agenda.

My point is, let's wait until the trial to find out the details. People rush to judgement before knowing them.

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Demanding the right to vote and then exercising it was an agent of change 50 years ago, and it needs to be again.

 

It never ceases to amaze me that in what is supposedly a democracy, there are those who fail to realize that if their ideas are so unappealing that they have to resort to disenfranchisement and other forms of game rigging, perhaps a reevaluation of those ideas might be in order.

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 Here's a bit of an article quoting one William Lawson, an 85-year-old African American preacher for the Rose of Sharon Baptist Church in Freedmen's Town:

 

%5Bsource%5D

 

Just a correction. Rev. Lawson is not affiliated with Rose of Sharon Baptist Church. He is the founding pastor of Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church in Third Ward. He was Senior Pastor at Wheeler from 1962 to 2005, and my family has been honored to personally know him over the past five decades. :)

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Just a correction. Rev. Lawson is not affiliated with Rose of Sharon Baptist Church. He is the founding pastor of Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church in Third Ward. He was Senior Pastor at Wheeler from 1962 to 2005, and my family has been honored to personally know him over the past five decades. :)

Their mistake, not mine. Unfortunately, like so many articles, most of it is behind a paywall now...though I can tell you that the first thing I noticed was the consistent misspelling of "Bissonnet".  :rolleyes:

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I honestly have no beef with the police having a few military weapons. Because we really don't have civilian militia's anymore it kind of makes a little since for someone to have it in case of an emergency. On the other had you don't want them having to much because then you literally have a standing army in your own town or city which is very alarming!

 

If they want military weapons then they should go to boot camp or other types of military training...or no weapons. Plain and simple. Especially if they go into training like this they will learn that there are ways of immobilizing someone instead of killing them. The fact the cop shot him like 6 times is indicative of the fact that it's not the guns fault in this matter, it's the cops training and attitude toward his own job. In that situation what was more important to him was his own life rather than trying to save the life of another. 

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To complaints that people don't exercise the right to vote:

 

I've noticed that people are easily manipulated by demagogues, but that left to their own devices, they tend to have a kind of bedrock common sense.
And, pace Kinkaidalum, voting, while never more pointless, has never been easier, amounting to a trip to the grocery store in the weeks leading up to an election.
 

I'm left to conclude that if the blacks of Ferguson don't bother to vote, it's because they understand what the simpletons in the media do not: most problems don't have political solutions. Would that they did.

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If the people of Ferguson want justice I have one word of advice for them:

 

Vote.

 

Yes, that's why people are there helping people register to vote, an action which the Missouri RNC chair calls "disgusting".

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I honestly have no beef with the police having a few military weapons. Because we really don't have civilian militia's anymore it kind of makes a little since for someone to have it in case of an emergency. On the other had you don't want them having to much because then you literally have a standing army in your own town or city which is very alarming!

 

For insurrection we have the National Guard. We don't need police armed like military.

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For insurrection we have the National Guard. We don't need police armed like military.

 

This. Militarizing the police can only end badly, since they will want to use the new toys whenever possible. I see no reason to have a fully automatic rifle in every police car - that's what SWAT teams are for on the exceedingly rare occasions where something other than shotguns and pistols are required.

 

I am also getting tired of police officers referring to citizens as civilians. Unless the police officers are active duty military, they are civilians too.

 

As for the situation in Ferguson, the sort of unrest that occurred there doesn't happen instantly, but is the result of tension that has built up over time, and finally comes to a head due to some triggering event.

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voting, while never more pointless, has never been easier, amounting to a trip to the grocery store in the weeks leading up to an election.

 

I'm left to conclude that if the blacks of Ferguson don't bother to vote, it's because they understand what the simpletons in the media do not: most problems don't have political solutions. Would that they did.

 

With all due respect, you're flat wrong.  

 

Unlike Texas, early voting does not exist in Missouri; instead, you have to get away between 7 AM and 7 PM on a Tuesday - that's a pretty big ask for someone with a lower income job (likely hourly - IF they can get the time off, it's a hit straight to a pocketbook that's undoubtedly already stretched), and probably other pressing obligations, like feeding the kids and/or going to the second job. As with many other municipalities (including Houston), the local elections stand alone, decreasing turnout further. Institutional disenfranchisement like this is unlikely to change in a place where the statewide executive director of a major political party refers to a voter registration drive as "disgusting." 

 

From one of my earlier links: 

 

Turnout is especially low among Ferguson’s African American residents, however. In 2013, for example, just 6 percent of eligible black voters cast a ballot in Ferguson’s municipal elections, as compared to 17 percent of white voters.

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While police militarizing has seemingly gone over the top, when I see people rioting, looting and burning buildings I want to see the police use every means at their disposal to protect innocent business and property owners, which by the way I believe the police up there showed remarkable restraint in reacting to the violent perpetrators that are no better then terrorists.

 

The people in New York peacefully protesting the death of Eric Garner I have empathy for, I have none for the people of Ferguson.  

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With all due respect, you're flat wrong.  

 

Unlike Texas, early voting does not exist in Missouri; instead, you have to get away between 7 AM and 7 PM on a Tuesday - that's a pretty big ask for someone with a lower income job (likely hourly - IF they can get the time off, it's a hit straight to a pocketbook that's undoubtedly already stretched), and probably other pressing obligations, like feeding the kids and/or going to the second job. As with many other municipalities (including Houston), the local elections stand alone, decreasing turnout further. Institutional disenfranchisement like this is unlikely to change in a place where the statewide executive director of a major political party refers to a voter registration drive as "disgusting." 

 

From one of my earlier links: 

 

Turnout is especially low among Ferguson’s African American residents, however. In 2013, for example, just 6 percent of eligible black voters cast a ballot in Ferguson’s municipal elections, as compared to 17 percent of white voters.

 

You're kind.

I am amazed Missouri is so thoroughly unpoliticized; they certainly are missing a trick. (I knew I liked it! - though I haven't been there since we buried my grandparents more than thirty years ago ...)

 

It is (perhaps?) worth noting that, among young black men, the particular group most concerned, much as we might all like to identify with them in a radical-chic sort of way, in these fatal police altercations - having a job that prevented you from going to the poll, could be considered a bargain at twice the price.

 

Black men have significantly lower employment rates than other demographic groups, but this wasn't always the case.  In 1969, the employment rates for men between the ages of 20 and 24 were about 77 percent for blacks and 79 percent for whites.  By 2012, the employment rate for young black men dropped to less than 50 percent, while young white men were about 18 percentage points higher at almost 68 percent. 

 

http://www.cepr.net/index.php/blogs/cepr-blog/addressing-chronic-black-male-unemployment

 

One wonders about that mayor, those 5 white city councilmen, the 94% of the police department: what's in it for them, what ranks of society they are drawn from (not the creme de la creme, one suspects). The rewards don't seem very great, prompting the suspicion that they are drawn to the conflict, and are carrying their own anger, about other things. That's practically another class issue right there.

But not one that attracts much notice.

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This really has nothing to do with race, but the DOJ and the feds were there from day 1 to make it about race, including FBI rats like Al Sharpton.  So yes, this kind of chaos can happen in Houston, we have plenty of race baiters here (remember Trayvon protesters blocking 288 traffic), and anywhere in America.  Your government will be working hard to make sure that it does.  So when you're all out in the streets stealing and rioting (because you can't help yourself, you're all victims), our militarized police in Houston will be brought in as our saviors, put in place martial law, and maybe kill some people, definitely attack people violently and indiscriminately. 

 

 

 

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Houston has a tolerance feel about it although ethnic groups tend to live in clusters as opposed to full integration. Another thread mentioned the days Herman Short ran HPD during the 60s-70s. Had things not changed, this city would have a very different climate.

Herman Short ran his department like the stereotypical Alabama state ... In 1970, when several policemen were accused of belonging to the Ku Klux Klan, Short told ... The Houston Police Department had only a handful of black patrolmen, and ...

books.google.com/books?id=zCsEAAAAMBAJ

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One wonders about that mayor, those 5 white city councilmen, the 94% of the police department: what's in it for them, what ranks of society they are drawn from (not the creme de la creme, one suspects). The rewards don't seem very great, prompting the suspicion that they are drawn to the conflict, and are carrying their own anger, about other things. That's practically another class issue right there.

But not one that attracts much notice.

 

It would be nice to be able to return to a time when having a decent job wasn't such a stretch.  The $1.60 minimum wage in 1969 would now be worth $10.50.  Henry Ford was excoriated for raising his workers' wages (granted, with all sorts of paternalistic oversight), but the idea was making those workers able to buy the cars they were building.

 

As far as the cop in question, his previous department was disbanded, largely because of tensions between the almost all white department and the almost all black community.

 

This really has nothing to do with race, but the DOJ and the feds were there from day 1 to make it about race, including FBI rats like Al Sharpton.  So yes, this kind of chaos can happen in Houston, we have plenty of race baiters here (remember Trayvon protesters blocking 288 traffic), and anywhere in America.  Your government will be working hard to make sure that it does.  So when you're all out in the streets stealing and rioting (because you can't help yourself, you're all victims), our militarized police in Houston will be brought in as our saviors, put in place martial law, and maybe kill some people, definitely attack people violently and indiscriminately. 

 

Wow. What color is the sky in your world?

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Herman Short was a bigot  ahole. Thank god he's still not around. 

 

Houston has a tolerance feel about it although ethnic groups tend to live in clusters as opposed to full integration. Another thread mentioned the days Herman Short ran HPD during the 60s-70s. Had things not changed, this city would have a very different climate.

Herman Short ran his department like the stereotypical Alabama state ... In 1970, when several policemen were accused of belonging to the Ku Klux Klan, Short told ... The Houston Police Department had only a handful of black patrolmen, and ...

books.google.com/books?id=zCsEAAAAMBAJ

 

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While police militarizing has seemingly gone over the top, when I see people rioting, looting and burning buildings I want to see the police use every means at their disposal to protect innocent business and property owners, which by the way I believe the police up there showed remarkable restraint in reacting to the violent perpetrators that are no better then terrorists.

 

The people in New York peacefully protesting the death of Eric Garner I have empathy for, I have none for the people of Ferguson.  

 

1. The abusive police response to peaceful protests created an unstable situation where looters and rioters prospered.

2. Your comment that you have no empathy for the people of Ferguson is a disgusting smear of many peaceful protesters who had nothing to do with rioting or looting.

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This really has nothing to do with race, but the DOJ and the feds were there from day 1 to make it about race, including FBI rats like Al Sharpton.  So yes, this kind of chaos can happen in Houston, we have plenty of race baiters here (remember Trayvon protesters blocking 288 traffic), and anywhere in America.  Your government will be working hard to make sure that it does.  So when you're all out in the streets stealing and rioting (because you can't help yourself, you're all victims), our militarized police in Houston will be brought in as our saviors, put in place martial law, and maybe kill some people, definitely attack people violently and indiscriminately. 

 

The 288 protest is precisely the example I cited earlier of police de-escalating a situation without the use of violence. The Ferguson police could take a lesson, and then maybe their town wouldn't have descended into chaos. Treat citizens like the enemy and they will become the enemy.

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Defend violence and mayhem  all you want. Good people wouldn't stand for it. I think we have better people here in Houston.

 

1. The abusive police response to peaceful protests created an unstable situation where looters and rioters prospered.

2. Your comment that you have no empathy for the people of Ferguson is a disgusting smear of many peaceful protesters who had nothing to do with rioting or looting.

 

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Defend violence and mayhem  all you want. Good people wouldn't stand for it. I think we have better people here in Houston.

 

I take it you didn't hear the statements from Ron Johnson and others in the police that most of the troublemakers arrested were from out of town.

Edited by kylejack

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 am willing to give the news media the benefit of the doubt and not immediately attack them on mishandling the truth until that is proven or disproven. 

 

You shouldn't.

 

They prove time and again they are unable to provide accurate information.

 

The Boston Marathon bombing was real eye opening for me, I happened to be reading a forum at the moment it went off, and was listening to police scanners the whole time that it was going on. All media outlets were wrong over and over and over again. publishing un-vetted information which I knew was wrong just by having listened to what was unfolding on a police scanner.

 

I'm even getting to a point where I don't even want to listen to NPR any longer, they have continually been saying the police officer killed an unarmed teenager. The cop had a broken eye socket, and other injuries, that's why he was in the hospital. I'd have unloaded until they stopped moving too if my eye socket was broken, and likely, my vision would have been too bad to see when after a few shots the guy put his hands up.

 

I think it's deplorable that the media spins things the way they do and I won't waste my time with them.

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You shouldn't.

They prove time and again they are unable to provide accurate information.

The Boston Marathon bombing was real eye opening for me, I happened to be reading a forum at the moment it went off, and was listening to police scanners the whole time that it was going on. All media outlets were wrong over and over and over again. publishing un-vetted information which I knew was wrong just by having listened to what was unfolding on a police scanner.

I'm even getting to a point where I don't even want to listen to NPR any longer, they have continually been saying the police officer killed an unarmed teenager. The cop had a broken eye socket, and other injuries, that's why he was in the hospital. I'd have unloaded until they stopped moving too if my eye socket was broken, and likely, my vision would have been too bad to see when after a few shots the guy put his hands up.

I think it's deplorable that the media spins things the way they do and I won't waste my time with them.

Where do you get that his eye socket was broken? That was another rumor spread by Fox news. And Brown WAS an unarmed teenager. Last time I checked, he was 18.

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You shouldn't.

 

They prove time and again they are unable to provide accurate information.

 

The Boston Marathon bombing was real eye opening for me, I happened to be reading a forum at the moment it went off, and was listening to police scanners the whole time that it was going on. All media outlets were wrong over and over and over again. publishing un-vetted information which I knew was wrong just by having listened to what was unfolding on a police scanner.

 

I'm even getting to a point where I don't even want to listen to NPR any longer, they have continually been saying the police officer killed an unarmed teenager. The cop had a broken eye socket, and other injuries, that's why he was in the hospital. I'd have unloaded until they stopped moving too if my eye socket was broken, and likely, my vision would have been too bad to see when after a few shots the guy put his hands up.

 

I think it's deplorable that the media spins things the way they do and I won't waste my time with them.

 

You don't like how unreliable the media can be in developing situation, so instead you get your information from blogs and forums, or what? There was no broken eye socket, and I think you shouldn't post inflammatory information like that without sourcing it. http://www.vox.com/xpress/2014/8/21/6054237/source-to-cnn-darren-wilson-didnt-have-a-fractured-eye-socket

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It would be nice to be able to return to a time when having a decent job wasn't such a stretch.  The $1.60 minimum wage in 1969 would now be worth $10.50.  Henry Ford was excoriated for raising his workers' wages (granted, with all sorts of paternalistic oversight), but the idea was making those workers able to buy the cars they were building.

 

 

I'm not sure if you think it would be nice, or if you are being facetious, but I wouldn't look for it to happen since corporate America has figured out that keeping American workers in a perpetual cage match with newcomers, is a good way to tamp down costs.

 

"Savings passed on to the consumer," of course, of course.

 

Only little hitch is the malaise that seems to come with "consumer" being one's identity, but that will pass in time, I expect.

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What are they calling out of town?  LA? New Orleans? I'm not familiar with Ferguson but it seems to be a small bedroom community inside of Saint Louis. If there was a protest here in West University or Bellaire and people walked over from Houston would they be considered out of town? 

 

And yes I agree with you that the troublemakers were the minority but doesn't change the fact that a violent demonstration is not going to win over public sentiment.  If a peaceful protest is not possible then don't have one.

 

I take it you didn't hear the statements from Ron Johnson and others in the police that most of the troublemakers arrested were from out of town.

 

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Ferguson isn't surrounded by St. Louis. It would be like if these protests were going on in Galena Park or Pearland.

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