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Thinking about naming my boy Houston


lockmat

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I just found out we're having a boy and I'm thinking about naming him Houston, or maybe Huston. Not sure if I would use it as a first or middle name.

 

Thoughts? Anyone know a Houston that lives in Houston? How does it sound calling him that?

 

The only Huston I've heard of is Huston Street - former pitcher for UT and currently for the Angels.

 

 

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From The Onion:

 

post-1-0-13563000-1407628521_thumb.jpg

 

Seriously, though -- A child's name is something they have to deal with for the rest of their lives.  It's not a way for parents to show how cool or interesting or original they are.  Your child is a human being, not a brand, and not a way to show off your creativity.  

 

Speaking as someone who endured decades of bullying as a child because of the name my parents chose to call me, don't do anything that would get your child a wedgie.  They'll never forgive you for it.

 

And speaking as someone who was at one time involved in hiring decisions at a very large company --  If there are two reasonably qualified applicants and one is named Michael and the other is named Prince Dyylin, Michael gets the job.  It's not fair, but life's not fair.  Do what's best for your child, not your ego.

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editor is right.  imagine being a 10 year old named houston growing up in houston.  consider all of the media stories with houston in the title that could be used to rag on your kid.  let's not forget the second biggest houston of them all whitney houston.  if you really want to shake things up name him "bachanon" or "triton"?

 

off the top of my head:

 

"houston we have lift off" as bullies throw your kid in the air.

"houston we have a problem" each time somebody trips your kid.

"look houston IS flooded" as water is dumped on your kids head.

 

as romantic a notion it may be to name your kid after our beloved city i'm not sure you'd be doing him a favor.  

go with "samuel" after sam houston or "allen" for the allen brothers.  i'd look for ways to be a little less literal in your tribute to houston and more child-identity friendly.

 

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Not if you live in Houston, for starters. I've heard of a kid named Denver, but he lived in Tomball (in the 1980s, no idea where Denver is now). A middle name might be more acceptable if you're bent on the idea, and it would be a fine name for a dog (naming a dog "Jack Daniels" is fine, a baby, not so much).

The real question is what your wife thinks of it.

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I agree with editor in that a kid has to live with whatever name you put on him/her. 

 

I'm in the 60+ crowd and I remember kids in elementary making fun of my given name.  Now, that's a long time ago but even back then, my name was "different", it's an old family name on my mom's side and it's still different today.  The ridicule continued in junior high and into high school.  When I hit the work force in the 60s, there was one particular guy who teased me about my name.  He was a good old boy from East Texas and I know it was in fun but I'm just saying............  We are still friends today and do keep in touch.  I tease him about his drawl and he teases me about my name.

 

One of my sisters, 50+ has another old family name beginning with a Z.  Those names have more recently become popular but when she was a kid, they weren't.  She endured teasing too but since she was "known" by her middle name, it wasn't so bad.

 

I do have to add though, the trend in the black community to name their children more African sounding names does not seem to have adversely affected those kiddos.  When I see some of them in print I'm bewildered as to how to pronounce them but again, it doesn't seem to be a issue to others. 

 

Bottom line is, what do I know?  I'm just adding my opinion and sharing a few memories.   

 

Just remember, the first name is what they will more than likely be called by teachers unless you specifically ask school personnel to use the middle name. 

 

I like the name Houston over Huston.  Huston could easily be mispronounced and having to correct someone gets tiring.  You either correct them or let it go.  I married a man with a somewhat different last name so I get it coming and going.

 

And Congratulations to you and your wife!  All I have is boys and I think they are great!!

 

 

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I do have to add though, the trend in the black community to name their children more African sounding names does not seem to have adversely affected those kiddos.  When I see some of them in print I'm bewildered as to how to pronounce them but again, it doesn't seem to be a issue to others. 

 

 

I wouldn't say people with "African sounding names" haven't been adversely affected. Some probably haven't, but I'm sure that some have. Like Editor said, if you had a Michael and a person with an unusual name applying for a job, and both are qualified for the job, Michael is probably going to get the job. It's wrong, but it happens. It doesn't even have to be a first name. According to the census, Washington, Jefferson, and Williams are the top surnames among black Americans. When it comes to two well qualified applicants named Samantha Washington and Samantha Smythe, Smythe will probably get higher priority for callbacks. There was a study done in 2004 by researchers at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business. Half of the resumes were given names like Emily Walsh, and the other half were given names like Lakeisha Washington. The researchers found that names like Emily Walsh received as many more callbacks equivalent to an additional eight years of experience on a resume.

 

As for the original poster, I think Houston would be best reserved for a middle name.

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It would not top my list.

My five rules for myself to keep us in check:

-- No place names

-- Looks good on a baptismal certificate

-- Looks good and easy to pronounce on the top of a resume

-- Didn't occur previously in close family

-- Did not start with the same letters as any of the core family members

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It would not top my list.

My five rules for myself to keep us in check:

-- No place names

-- Looks good on a baptismal certificate

-- Looks good and easy to pronounce on the top of a resume

-- Didn't occur previously in close family

-- Did not start with the same letters as any of the core family members

 

Heed #4 (and to some extent #5). My father and I have the same first name but different middle names. I am not a Jr.

 

Among family and friends Dad goes by his middle name but on legal stuff he is styled "First name, Middle Initial (which is also different from mine), Last name. I have always gone by my first name. Even so the stupid credit reporting agencies have always had our reports maddeningly "intertwined." This has actually not been a problem since my father has had sterling credit for almost 60 years. It is well to honor ancestors when naming your children but keep lilyheights suggestions in mind.

 

One final point: If you name your son Michael or your daughter Elizabeth for example know that others will use diminutives of these names whether you want them to or not. If you have no problem with Mikey or Mickey or Betsy or Lizzy all right.

 

I know of a man whose first name is James. His father did not want people calling him Jimmy so, when he was young, the family called him Jamie. Obviously he was able to end as he grew older and introduced himself to others as James but, as everyone found out later, he never did like being called Jamie.

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One final point: If you name your son Michael or your daughter Elizabeth for example know that others will use diminutives of these names whether you want them to or not. If you have no problem with Mikey or Mickey or Betsy or Lizzy all right.

I would avoid names associated with pop cultural characters or one-of-a-kind names that are only used with celebrities, like in editor's case (hint: NHL). That's why I would avoid names like Mickey, Mario (unless you're actually Italian), and the like.

The only way I could realistically see you naming your kid Houston is if you planned to do it as part of some sort of American city names theme, and even then, I would still think of that as being kind of strange, and would still be reminded of that bit from Forrest Gump: "There was Dallas, from Phoenix; Cleveland - he was from Detroit; and Tex... well, I don't remember where Tex come from."

Furthermore, Houston is one of those baby boy names that just aren't good for actual city names:

GOOD:

Denver

Austin

Allen

Tomball

BAD:

Houston

Detroit

Syracuse

Truth or Consequences ;)

Edited by IronTiger
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Houston is a good last name. If you really want him to have Houston then make it a middle name. This way if he does like Houston then he can use it as a nick name later as that's sometimes how middle names function. Not a first name though -.- Just don't.

Edited by Luminare
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Houston is a good last name. If you really want him to have Houston then make it a middle name. This way if he does like Houston then he can use it as a nick name later as that's sometimes how middle names function. Not a first name though -.- Just don't.

Yeah, that's not what I would name anyone. I would stay away from the following categories:

- Anything with a non-alphabetical character

- Anything that has to do with nerd/movie/video game culture

- Certain city names (including Houston)

- Anything that's a different spelling than something found more commonly (VERY common today, sadly)

- Anything that is hard to pronounce (I feel for the sorry for the kids that are plagued with this problem in attendance calling, especially the ones that AREN'T immigrants)

- Something you found funny at the time ("Wouldn't be cool if we named our baby Artaxerxes?")

- Anything that's just a letter

That still leaves a lot to use, though

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Same names in the family cause all sorts of confusion.  

 

My dad kept using "Jr." at the end of his name until the end of his life; I thought "III" after our not at all Anglo Saxon family name was just too pretentious for words, and we not only lived in the same city but also had some of the same professional associations (even though we had different professions).  Though within the family we could usually sort out who was being discussed or summoned, it was ever so much fun to be in my 30s and having a receptionist ask whether I was big mollusk or little mollusk (since Dad kept using the Jr., they couldn't ask "senior or junior?").  Then, the last time I started car shopping, I was informed that I had a credit score of zero.  It seems that a credit card company that I hadn't done business with in years (but who the folks stayed with) got me confused with my dad and reported that I had left this mortal coil.  Fortunately, it was a very legitimate credit card company whose reaction could best be paraphrased as "oh good grief, that's terrible.  We are very sorry, and will fix this immediately" - and they did.

 

Also, be aware of what the name rhymes with.  Your son's young cronies certainly will (he said from experience).

Edited by mollusk
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Also, be aware of what the name rhymes with.  Your son's young cronies certainly will (he said from experience).

 

A former coworker's name sounded just like a reference to a "marital aid". Once, during a meeting with a potential new vendor, the around-the-table introductions were proceeding when my coworker was asked to repeat his name. He did so, enunciating very deliberately and with emphasis, at which point the vendor rep smiled and said "I bet 8th grade was awesome". Of course, everyone burst out laughing. 

 

Unfortunately, blame can't be laid at his parents' feet, as this was his family name as opposed to his given name. 

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I just found out we're having a boy and I'm thinking about naming him Houston, or maybe Huston. Not sure if I would use it as a first or middle name.

 

Thoughts? Anyone know a Houston that lives in Houston? How does it sound calling him that?

 

The only Huston I've heard of is Huston Street - former pitcher for UT and currently for the Angels.

Congrats!

 

First name Sam Middle Houston perhaps?

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There is not a name that has yet been thought of that young kids (boys in particular) cannot turn into a point of ridicule.  It's more about the personality of the child than it is the name.  I would be proud to name a boy Houston.  Raise your boy to not be a whiney pipsqueak who invites ridicule and he'll be fine.

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First things first I'm the realest. Just Kidding, first of all congrats! I think Houston would make a good middle name. If you do include it, spell it the right way. You owe this city. 

 

My parents let my 2 1/2 year old brother name me. I absolutely hate it, and wouldn't wish it on anyone.

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My parents let my 2 1/2 year old brother name me. I absolutely hate it, and wouldn't wish it on anyone.

OK, now I know Editor's first name (relatively uncommon but shares it with one of the greats of hockey) but know I'm really curious of yours, like if he named you after a character on Sesame Street or something.

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OK, now I know Editor's first name (relatively uncommon but shares it with one of the greats of hockey) but know I'm really curious of yours, like if he named you after a character on Sesame Street or something.

It's Mitchell.

 

What do the first 5 letters rhyme with? I guess I've let it shape me because i'm a pretty big b*itch.

 

Mitch the B*itch, B*itchell, and sometimes just plain old b*itch. Mitch is a b*itch, mitch is the b*itch, along those lines. Mitchy, Michelle, Michael, Michelley, Mitchello. It is impossible for even college professors to pronounce my name. It is the name that no one can speak.

 

Edit: I've even been told to go by Mitch because it sounds "straighter".

 

So moral of the story; Lockmat, please don't name your child something that will haunt them for the rest of their life.

Edited by Montrose1100
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It's Mitchell.

 

What do the first 5 letters rhyme with? I guess I've let it shape me because i'm a pretty big b*itch.

 

Mitch the B*itch, B*itchell, and sometimes just plain old b*itch. Mitch is a b*itch, mitch is the b*itch, along those lines. Mitchy, Michelle, Michael, Michelley, Mitchello. It is impossible for even college professors to pronounce my name. It is the name that no one can speak.

 

Edit: I've even been told to go by Mitch because it sounds "straighter".

 

So moral of the story; Lockmat, please don't name your child something that will haunt them for the rest of their life.

 

That's not too bad, I was imagining worse, like "Grover" or something.

 

Maybe it just sounds more normal to me since I drive on (or at least cross) "Harvey Mitchell Parkway" nearly every single time I go somewhere (it is like a REAL parkway in some parts, admittedly, but only some parts)

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That's not too bad, I was imagining worse, like "Grover" or something.

 

Maybe it just sounds more normal to me since I drive on (or at least cross) "Harvey Mitchell Parkway" nearly every single time I go somewhere (it is like a REAL parkway in some parts, admittedly, but only some parts)

It's a common last name. LOL at Grover. I would almost prefer grover over Mitchell.

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First - Congrats.

 

Second - There are just under 7.2 billion people...

http://www.census.gov/popclock/

 

I'd like to argue against the crowd if you will....

 

Yes, there are crazy names - and certainly names to avoid - however, Houston is not such a terrible name that I think (unlike quite a few here) your child will have problems with it in the future.  What is to say you (or they) will even live in Houston much down the road?  Avoiding a name to avoid your child from being picked on is...well.... you can't!  Kids will pick on other kids.  Also, I'd certainly agree there are some names to avoid in regards to sounding "professional," but you can't say that an HR person or senior manager will avoid hiring your child (20+ years in the future) because his first name is Houston!  That's preposterous.  They should have a resume and education or qualifications to set them out enough that they can have the following names and still work: Prince, King, and Sky.  Yes, I've actually worked with people with those names, and yes they were professionals and no they were not strange people.  Oddly enough they were able to 1) get an education (go figure), 2) Get a real job, and 3) actually make it in said "real job"!  Amazing, I know!  Perhaps the HR people hired them for their merits and not their names?

 

Experience has taught me people are much less likely to be hired due to having bad accents, don't act professional, and because they DO NOT LOOK professional - not because they have a unique name.

 

However, the idea that you are asking/consulting us means you're not really close to being 100% sold on the name either.

Edited by arche_757
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I had a Lab mix named Houston. Great dog. My son has a regular name

I had a Lab mix named Houston. Great dog. My son has a regular name

So nice you named it twice.

 

If you do Houston, it's going to be a middle or nickname, give him something else to go by.

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So nice you named it twice.

 

If you do Houston, it's going to be a middle or nickname, give him something else to go by.

 

The joy of posting from a mobile, and not seeing the result until after the edit deadline is gone.

 

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Congratulations on the addition to your family. I, too, have an odd name (at least you won't see it on a key chain anywhere) and it led me to be nicknamed the "L-10-11" because I was "built like a jumbo jet".

When you stand 6'1" and weigh over 220lbs in 8th grade, nicknames like that tend to arise. It could've been worse, my grandmother was a big child as well, and they called her "Fatty Arbuckle".

Anyway, my letterman's jacket still has the "L-10-11" inscribed on the back of it, but I have moved away from using my God given first name. Due to absolutely no one being able to pronounce it correctly on the first attempt, I use my middle name Joseph, which has shortened to "Joe". If you can't pronounce that correctly, well I don't know what to tell you, lol. I kind of hate that I was named after my late grandfather, whom I have much respect for, but don't use it for the aforementioned reasons.

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