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6-Story Residential Midrise At 1711 Caroline


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Located in the Southwest quadrant of the Houston CBD, Block 365 was acquired for multifamily development in the fast growing Downtown Houston submarket. With over five million square feet of office space development planned over the next 3 years, and a wealth of new hotels, retail and restaurants coming online as well, the city of Houston has created an incentive for developers to build apartments in the CBD to complement the continued growth in the downtown area. Growth in the Energy, Medical and Financial sectors has made Houston one of the strongest markets for job growth in the country, and has created significant demand for housing. Leon Capital Group is working with the architects at Hensley Lamkin Rachel, Inc. to design the property, and both groups are working closely with the Downtown District to meet the design guidelines that accompany the Downtown Living program. The project is planned to begin in Q4 2014 and will consist of 220 luxury apartments with resort style amenities, along withgreat views of downtown, walkability to major sports arenas and nightlife, and close proximity to a very dense and growing employment center.


http://leoncapitalgroup.com/casestudy/block-365-downtown-houston-multifamily-development/

Block 365 is bounded by Jefferson/Pease/Austin & Caroline.

http://www.downtownhouston.org/site_media/uploads/attachments/2014-01-06/Block_Map_2014_1.pdf

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Open air   Block 365 by Marc longoria, on Flickr

Via Flickr:   GET_2044 by photolitherland, on Flickr    

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With all this luxury apts in downtown, can we please get some moderately priced units in east downtown, near north side and thirdward?

This is not San Francisco every new development can't be luxury. There are already zillions in midtown, Montrose, 4th ward, Allen Parkway, River Oaks and Uptown.

Can we get some nice one bedrooms in the $750 range?

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I fully endorse the previous 3 posts. ^

Not everyone is rich and im sure alot of people who work downtown in the restaurant/bar industry, office cleaners, garbage men, window washers etc would all LOVE to live downtown and not have to commute to work, ESPECIALLY the ones who dont have a vehicle.

Unfortunately, in defense of the developers who are building all the residential downtown, they are in the business of making profit, and with the money they spend on buying the land, building the apartments, permitting, planning etc, building low rent apartments simply wont work, they would lose money.

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Yes Howard, I don't expect cheaply priced housing downtown itself, that's why I specified, East Downtown, the near north side and 3rd ward. Close, all three areas connected by rail and bus, perfect fit boosting both residential population and public transit ridership while easing freeway congestion and length of commute.

Just to be clear, I'm not advocating for projects, its just that everything announced is marketed as luxury apartments (even though they look cheap as f&@$) when that is just a fragment of our population

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I agree with HoustonIsHome, Howard Huge, and the last few posters about affordable housing being desperately needed. Welcome to likely the biggest issue facing Houston for at least the next generation. "Affordable housing" is a hot-button topic in just about every major city in the world. The denser and more attractive Houston's core becomes, the more expensive. People who aren't rich are forced to the fringes.

 

Many cities have programs such as 80-20, where developers are forced to include 20% "affordable" units in their developments. Developers, of course, fight this tooth and nail. Section 8 is another program. For all the negatives of sprawl, Houston has long enjoyed cheap housing all over town because demand was fairly displaced and not everyone wanted to live inside the Loop. Things have changed, though. This is a new era for Houston, It's exciting that we're building like crazy, but market-driven cheap housing is a thing of the past. Maybe after the Downtown District gets its fill of all these "luxury" apartments, it'll start seeing just how desperately needed a mix of unit types is and work up an incentive program for affordable units! Wishful thinking I'm sure...

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This will be the last development announcement I'll believe for today. Anything else and I'll cast it aside as an April Fools joke... I'm just waiting for someone to post a rendering of a 100-story behemoth. 

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Yes Howard, I don't expect cheaply priced housing downtown itself, that's why I specified, East Downtown, the near north side and 3rd ward. Close, all three areas connected by rail and bus, perfect fit boosting both residential population and public transit ridership while easing freeway congestion and length of commute.

Just to be clear, I'm not advocating for projects, its just that everything announced is marketed as luxury apartments (even though they look cheap as f&@$) when that is just a fragment of our population

100% agree with this sentiment, and I have been screaming for affordable apartments in Houstons core for years.
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If this project really does start this fall, what are "typical" construction durations for something like this? A year? 18 months?

Just curious.

Also, that is going to be a 6 story building. What does Houston building (fire) codes require: concrete slab floors or just wood frame?

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Who has a total on residential units in the planning/construction phase downtown now? 

 

Seems the incentive program was warmly received. Hope it all goes, I may be a buyer in 15 years or so if I can talk the Mrs. in to it. 

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Was the residential incentive program limited to certain blocks, or does it apply to all of downtown?  I'm thrilled to see a residential cluster actually developing in the Parking District.  If these take hold that may spur on more non-incentivized development.

 

 

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Thanks for the scoop, Urbannizer. 

 

I'm curious to see how all of this residential development, particularly in the southern end of downtown, will come together.  To be honest, I'm a bit worried.  Downtown needs many things, and projects like Block 365 satisfy some of them (infill, the elimination of surface parking, residential).  For that, I am grateful.  But the 5-story superblock north of Skyhouse, the weird Lego block south of the co-cathedral, the two projects south of Root Square, and Block 365 could all combine to make a giant, uncoordinated mishmash that I fear will turn that section of downtown into midtown north.  And by "midtown north," I am referring to the central part of midtown, not the pedestrian-friendly area near Fourth Ward.  The view along the Pierce Elevated is arguably the ugliest in all of Houston, regardless of which direction you're looking.  I am not sure whether these residential projects will play any role in changing that.

 

The introduction of all of these residential projects will create at least three distinct residential neighborhoods within the CBD.  What will their respective characters be?  Market Square and the area to the south have a nice, historic vibe that is even reflected in the architecture of their upcoming additions (JW Marriott, 38-story high-rise, Hines residential, the polarizing 40-story high-rise resi).  It is easy to tell that the section from GreenStreet east to EaDo will be for young professionals, trendy people of all ages, and tourists.  What will south Downtown be?  Family-friendly?  Artsy?

 

Note: I'm not being Negative Nate.  This is just discourse.

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Thanks for the scoop, Urbannizer. 

 

I'm curious to see how all of this residential development, particularly in the southern end of downtown, will come together.  To be honest, I'm a bit worried.  Downtown needs many things, and projects like Block 365 satisfy some of them (infill, the elimination of surface parking, residential).  For that, I am grateful.  But the 5-story superblock north of Skyhouse, the weird Lego block south of the co-cathedral, the two projects south of Root Square, and Block 365 could all combine to make a giant, uncoordinated mishmash that I fear will turn that section of downtown into midtown north.  And by "midtown north," I am referring to the central part of midtown, not the pedestrian-friendly area near Fourth Ward.  The view along the Pierce Elevated is arguably the ugliest in all of Houston, regardless of which direction you're looking.  I am not sure whether these residential projects will play any role in changing that.

 

The introduction of all of these residential projects will create at least three distinct residential neighborhoods within the CBD.  What will their respective characters be?  Market Square and the area to the south have a nice, historic vibe that is even reflected in the architecture of their upcoming additions (JW Marriott, 38-story high-rise, Hines residential, the polarizing 40-story high-rise resi).  It is easy to tell that the section from GreenStreet east to EaDo will be for young professionals, trendy people of all ages, and tourists.  What will south Downtown be?  Family-friendly?  Artsy?

 

Note: I'm not being Negative Nate.  This is just discourse.

I am not really seeing it, as I review alot of the units proposed for SOHU..( Lets not call it that just a short hand) many of them seem to be of the same same squared off design just of various heights..( the exception being skyhouse) I think will be much more uniform that you think... I do give you props for pointing out  the three diffrent styles that are popping up( The ones by market sqare are a given since the historic district is very anal about that part and anything buildt over there will have to have a more comptemary design... I think we will see highrasies develop more turn Minnute made area since the set back would create a clear view of DT entire skyline

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The denser and more attractive Houston's core becomes, the more expensive. 

 

I think you have this somewhat reversed. I would say:

 

"The more attractive Houston becomes, the denser and more expensive."

 

Its increasing attractiveness is due to a number of factors including a strong economy and a variety of quality of life improvements. Then the feedback loop kicks in and the denser, fancier developments make it even more attractive and so on.

 

The first thing I'd say about the preponderance of "luxury" developments is that luxury is not a regulated term. Whatever the price point, developers call it "luxury" to make it sound more attractive.

 

Secondly, developers aren't creating the demand for expensive apartments, they're responding to it. As long as there's demand for expensive apartments they might as well build expensive apartments since I'd imagine they're the most profitable.

 

Escalation in overall rent prices and the negative impact on housing affordability are definite concerns, but I haven't seen where the "affordable unit" requirements you mention have solved the problem anywhere. Ultimately, housing prices are due to simple supply and demand. The market will respond to demand if it can. For the city to require affordable units while simultaneously stipulating excessive amounts of parking would be asinine.

 

Right now, to build a one-bedroom apartment of, say, 800 square feet, a developer must build 1.33 parking spaces. Including aisle area, that's an additional 400 square feet or more. So very roughly speaking, that apartment will cost 50% more than if it didn't come with a parking space. Property managers could unbundle the rent for the unit from the rent for the parking space, but right now there's no incentive to do that when the regulations create an oversupply such that the free market price of a space is zero.

 

Developers provide the exact number of windows, closets, toilets, cabinets, and treadmills they think they need to make a project viable. Government-mandated parking is unnecessary and leads to poor urban outcomes and decreased affordability.

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I think you have this somewhat reversed. I would say:

 

"The more attractive Houston becomes, the denser and more expensive."

 

Its increasing attractiveness is due to a number of factors including a strong economy and a variety of quality of life improvements. Then the feedback loop kicks in and the denser, fancier developments make it even more attractive and so on.

 

The first thing I'd say about the preponderance of "luxury" developments is that luxury is not a regulated term. Whatever the price point, developers call it "luxury" to make it sound more attractive.

 

Secondly, developers aren't creating the demand for expensive apartments, they're responding to it. As long as there's demand for expensive apartments they might as well build expensive apartments since I'd imagine they're the most profitable.

 

Escalation in overall rent prices and the negative impact on housing affordability are definite concerns, but I haven't seen where the "affordable unit" requirements you mention have solved the problem anywhere. Ultimately, housing prices are due to simple supply and demand. The market will respond to demand if it can. For the city to require affordable units while simultaneously stipulating excessive amounts of parking would be asinine.

 

Right now, to build a one-bedroom apartment of, say, 800 square feet, a developer must build 1.33 parking spaces. Including aisle area, that's an additional 400 square feet or more. So very roughly speaking, that apartment will cost 50% more than if it didn't come with a parking space. Property managers could unbundle the rent for the unit from the rent for the parking space, but right now there's no incentive to do that when the regulations create an oversupply such that the free market price of a space is zero.

 

Developers provide the exact number of windows, closets, toilets, cabinets, and treadmills they think they need to make a project viable. Government-mandated parking is unnecessary and leads to poor urban outcomes and decreased affordability.

 

I agree with most of your points, however...the apartment does not cost 50% more just because the area for parking is 50% more. The parking space is much cheaper to build than the apartment space - no finishes, no walls, no plumbing, no air conditioning...

 

Also, at least in downtown, the developers are building only the amount of parking they think is necessary to make the project viable. Downtown (and a few blocks in Midtown) have ZERO parking requiremetns. Even outside downtown Houston, most cities require less parking (at least for residential, retail is another issue) than what demand warrants. I've worked on dozens of apartment buildings, and not once did we have to build more parking that was required by the market.

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Government-mandated parking is unnecessary and leads to poor urban outcomes and decreased affordability.

Totally agree.

Been saying this for years

I read a study that gave this very reason as one of three reasons why midtown's boom after the rail went in wasn't as fast as everyone expected. The other two being speculators sitting on properties and the cost associated with building up rather than town homes.

But yes, I keep hearing on this site that developers know what they are doing and we should let them do their do, but why don't we allow them to make their own decisions on parking.

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I read something recently that excessive parking can in some cases decrease tax revenue since it may not be an effective use of land.

That assumes that there is demand for a more efficient use of the land that is being used for parking. Downtown has had a large amount of surface parking for years because the demand wasn't there. Government regulation had nothing to do with it.

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That assumes that there is demand for a more efficient use of the land that is being used for parking. Downtown has had a large amount of surface parking for years because the demand wasn't there. Government regulation had nothing to do with it.

I don't think that is the whole picture. Some of those lots had buildings on them. Also, paying taxes on a vacant building makes less sense than generating income from a surface lot.

So demand is part of the picture but so is finances. You have to look at the market, demand, cost of land downtown etc etc

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I don't think that is the whole picture. Some of those lots had buildings on them. Also, paying taxes on a vacant building makes less sense than generating income from a surface lot.

So demand is part of the picture but so is finances. You have to look at the market, demand, cost of land downtown etc etc

Fair enough and agree with your comments. However, it still has everything to do with market conditions and nothing to do with government regulation.

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  • 3 weeks later...

This one was recently announced abs I already forgot about it.

Don't think it will be anything memorable about it especially being sandwiched between a 10 storey building and a 21 storey building.

I guess alliance is going up first and will have more visibility being right on the train line. I guess I will use Alliance as a measure to see how well I can stomach this type of residential in the middle of towers downtown.

This development will be next to blocks with buildings that are 100 feet tall or more on the northeast, the east, the south east, the south and the southwest. So five of the adjacent 8 blocks will have decent heights, Two of the remaining three are ripe for development (one is empty, the other has a uhaul and parking), the third is owned by the co cathedral.

At least the 7 storey fingers development is good looking, its massive and has many other short structures near. Thus one and Alliance just makes me want to ask "what were they thinking"

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I don't like that Rent Control Laws and Green Space Laws seem to create the highest rents in the country and only allow the building of luxury housing (which is often exempt from such laws) or the protection of well connected citizens or existing owners who get great deals and huge property value increases (See San Francisco and New York). Also that in real terms these laws have led to huge decreases in the real numbers of African Americans in San Francisco, teachers and firefighters having two hour commutes and in New York to blight and abandonment in Harlem, NY. These laws are so counterproductive that Sweden repealed them. So lets not go there. Even where I live in Maryland our County Executives in Montgomery County have no interest in those solutions, thank goodness.

But I do like that Houston offers the reasonable incentive of 15K per unit, that seems to be a better way to get this done and is really pretty free of extras for the politicians and their patrons as far as I can tell. I chalk that one down as a good investment. I think you have some cross-cutting appeal with the mayor being socially liberal but the economics of the city staying distinct and as free as possible. You just have to live with the fortune teller and gas station across from your house in exchange for the greatest collection of fast food choices and conveniences ever seen. Where I lived recently in Montgomery County Maryland, a rich DC suburb. I had exactly two places to deliver food and almost no good eating out choices with 20 minutes. But I am probably 50 pounds lighter because I won't be tempted to get the Whata Burger 32 ounce strawberry shake.

Excellent points but Harlem is being gentrified. Bill Clinton has a residence there I believe

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I walked this area today. I took some pics but it says they are too big to upload.

I really like the area. It seemed nicely treed, the area is quiet but close to a lot. It didn't seem as dead as I remembered. I can't wait to see what the addition of residents do.

Edited by HoustonIsHome
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This one was recently announced abs I already forgot about it.

Don't think it will be anything memorable about it especially being sandwiched between a 10 storey building and a 21 storey building.

I guess alliance is going up first and will have more visibility being right on the train line. I guess I will use Alliance as a measure to see how well I can stomach this type of residential in the middle of towers downtown.

This development will be next to blocks with buildings that are 100 feet tall or more on the northeast, the east, the south east, the south and the southwest. So five of the adjacent 8 blocks will have decent heights, Two of the remaining three are ripe for development (one is empty, the other has a uhaul and parking), the third is owned by the co cathedral.

At least the 7 storey fingers development is good looking, its massive and has many other short structures near. Thus one and Alliance just makes me want to ask "what were they thinking"

 

they were probably thinking "how do we maximize our profits?"

 

crazy idea.

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they were probably thinking "how do we maximize our profits?"

crazy idea.

So the other developers building all around this development doesn't know about this magic maximize profits idea? Are they the only one that knows about?

They gonna be mad at you now, you let the zillions of other developments around this know the secret.

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is there no ignore feature on this board?

 

You'll be happy to know there is!  There is a drop-down menu on your member name in the upper right-hand corner.  From there click on "Manage Ignore Prefs".  It's one of board's best features.  I highly recommend it.  ;-)

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  • 2 weeks later...

New residential planned for south downtown near the two planned Camden blocks + the Orion block

 

5-story

220-unit residential building

Developer: Leon Capital Group

Est. construction start 4Q 2014

Est. completion 2Q 2016

 

http://www.downtownhouston.org/site_media/uploads/attachments/2014-05-08/140505_Downtown_Houston_Development_Map_11x17.pdf

Edited by downtownian
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A public program to subsidize new housing in downtown has attracted another developer, who wants to build 220 luxury apartments in the southern end of the city center.

Dallas-based Leon Capital Group is working with the Hensley Lamkin Rachel architecture firm, also of Dallas, to design a building with high-end residential units and "resort-style amenities," according to the developer's website. The project is expected to break ground by the end of the year on a block bounded by Pease, Jefferson, Austin and Caroline.

The new complex is the latest to be approved under the city's Downtown Living Initiative program, which gives developers tax breaks of as much as $15,000 for each residence built in a complex of at least 10 units, providing they meet design guidelines. The idea behind the program is to provide a financial boost to developers faced with the high costs of building downtown.

The cap on the number of units that could benefit from the program was raised to 5,000 from 2,500 last month.

So far, 3,642 units have been approved, reports Bob Eury, executive director of the downtown management district.

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Residential-developer-seeks-to-join-the-downtown-5481887.php

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Wow, it seems like in several years we will have a blight-free downtown since all these new residents will want to clean things up near where they live, for example: the Savoy is getting redone and Texas Tower is gone.

 

I am just thinking, what are the blight building left? so we can check them off the list as they renovate or demolish (not counting parking lots, of course).

 

 

http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/30146-what-happened-to-downtowns-major-vacant-buildings/

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  • 1 month later...

sorry if there is already a thread on this. i dont recall hearing anything about this until the new development map came out last night. looks like the residential population of southern downtown will continue to grow. this will bridge the gap between the 10 8 story apartment mid-rise by Allied Orion, and the 21 story apartment towers by Camden.

Leon Capital Group
220 Units
5 stories
 

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sorry if there is already a thread on this. i dont recall hearing anything about this until the new development map came out last night. looks like the residential population of southern downtown will continue to grow. this will bridge the gap between the 10 8 story apartment mid-rise by Allied Orion, and the 21 story apartment towers by Camden.

Leon Capital Group

220 Units

5 stories

It was listed in May.

http://www.downtownhouston.org/site_media/uploads/attachments/2014-05-08/140505_Downtown_Houston_Development_Map_11x17.pdf

And it is a crying shame, IMO, that there is a bland mid-rise going up there. Mid-rises are for mid-town. Highrises are for downtown.

Edited by UtterlyUrban
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oops.. i wonder why a thread was never made for it?

yeah. i sort of agree, but the key at the moment is building up the residential population. plus, there are so many surface lots still left in downtown that a few mid-rises wont be the end of the world. who knows.. maybe in 20-30 years when the property values are that much higher the owners of these mid-rises will tear them down in favor of more high-rise towers?

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to 6-Story Residential Midrise At 1711 Caroline

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