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Pearl Marketplace at Midtown: Apartments, Whole Foods

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14 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Water getting into the conduits...

 

 

Has that proven to be a large problem here in areas where lines are buried?

 

On balance (taking out the cost part of the equation, which is clear), when installed correctly to , over their life-cycle, are underground lines preferable to above-ground in terms of service availability?

 

https://www.tdworld.com/intelligent-undergrounding/flooding-and-underground-cables-myth-or-reality

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, mattyt36 said:

 

Such as . . . ?

With above ground utility lines, often the source of a problem is clearly identifiable (i.e., a limb across a power line).  A short or break in an underground line can be difficult to pinpoint, and may require extensive digging to track down the problem. Obviously, repairs would be further complicated if the problem is in a flooded area.
Full disclosure: my experience with underground service is limited to residential areas and occurred several years ago. That being said, there were problems caused by Houston's gumbo soil, including degrading of the insulation covering the wires, and stress caused by the expansion and contraction of the soil.
edit: Didn't see your second post before making my reply. The shortcomings I described above can largely be eliminated if sufficient precautions are taken. 
We agree that these measures don't come cheap.

Edited by dbigtex56

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38 minutes ago, mattyt36 said:

 

Has that proven to be a large problem here in areas where lines are buried?

 

On balance (taking out the cost part of the equation, which is clear), when installed correctly to , over their life-cycle, are underground lines preferable to above-ground in terms of service availability?

 

https://www.tdworld.com/intelligent-undergrounding/flooding-and-underground-cables-myth-or-reality

 

My uncle is an electrician and says it's not a matter of if, but when water will enter the conduit. This has more to do with the high water table and large amounts of rainfall than flooding.

 

I would take the link with a grain of salt; industry publications tend to promote and be overly optimistic about technologies and services in the industry. This is because they live on advertising and the advertisers are selling the products/services they write articles about. The article reads like an advertisement and does not include any stats on the historical performance of buried lines, just a bunch of explanation of how well the lines are designed, therefore they could never take in water.

 

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4 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

My uncle is an electrician and says it's not a matter of if, but when water will enter the conduit. This has more to do with the high water table and large amounts of rainfall than flooding.

 

I would take the link with a grain of salt; industry publications tend to promote and be overly optimistic about technologies and services in the industry. This is because they live on advertising and the advertisers are selling the products/services they write articles about. The article reads like an advertisement and does not include any stats on the historical performance of buried lines, just a bunch of explanation of how well the lines are designed, therefore they could never take in water.

 

 

First part of this I get and understand.

 

The second part sounds like something I would read from some postmodern literary crit class. Of course they are optimistic. They wouldn't write about it or promote it if they didn't think it would be profitable nor be a benefit for others as well (yeah man this process really sucks lets write an article about how terrible this process or product is!). Thats like if in the Post Oak thread where I'm talking about needing to bury trees below grade because its better for pedestrian infrastructure and the take away from that would be that I'm not really advocating for what would be a public good or sound design, but I'm a shill for Big Tree companies and Big Dirt companies. Come on man. Give people the benefit of the doubt. The first part was legit info and the second was just speculative bs.

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2 hours ago, Luminare said:

 

First part of this I get and understand.

 

The second part sounds like something I would read from some postmodern literary crit class. Of course they are optimistic. They wouldn't write about it or promote it if they didn't think it would be profitable nor be a benefit for others as well (yeah man this process really sucks lets write an article about how terrible this process or product is!). Thats like if in the Post Oak thread where I'm talking about needing to bury trees below grade because its better for pedestrian infrastructure and the take away from that would be that I'm not really advocating for what would be a public good or sound design, but I'm a shill for Big Tree companies and Big Dirt companies. Come on man. Give people the benefit of the doubt. The first part was legit info and the second was just speculative bs.

 

There should be nothing controversial about skepticism of articles in trade publications. I'm not saying they can't write the article and promote the technology, I'm saying that such an article shouldn't automatically override conventional wisdom on potential problems with burying electrical lines in soggy areas.

 

My sentence "I would take the link with a grain of salt" was pretty modest, nothing like how you're caricaturing me.

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Woman featured in new Houston mural in critical condition after crash in NW Harris Co.

 
 
EMBED <>MORE VIDEOS 
 

The three women said to be as close as sisters, were headed to a church meeting when the accident happened.

Tuesday, April 30, 2019 9:32PM
A woman featured in a recently completed mural in Midtown was one of the victims in a deadly two-vehicle crash over the weekend. 

The mural that looks just like a bunch of random pixel squares actually holds a secret inside. 
 

"There are actually five faces within this design that you can see if you look in your phone or if you look from across the street from a distance," the artist told ABC13 Eyewitness News last week. 

One of the faces is that of Shawndra Silas, who is currently in critical condition following the crash that killed two other women. 

The mural, which is on the side of a new Whole Foods on the corner of Smith and Elgin Street, depicts every day, unsung heroes of Houston. 

Jolanda Silas and Edwina King were both killed in the accident on Saturday afternoon at the 2500 block of Fallbrook Drive. 

RELATED: Deputies identify victims in two-vehicle crash in northwest Harris County 
 

The three women said to be as close as sisters, were headed to a church meeting when the accident happened. 

Family members continue trying to come to grips with the loss. 

"Superhero, Superhero. That was my mom. She was my superhero," said Cedric Cheeves, whose mom was killed in the accident. 

"She was my protector. She wouldn't let anyone not just do anything to harm me, but you couldn't even say anything bad about me when she was around," said John Silas of his sister. 

Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said a 16-year-old boy with a driving permit was driving a pickup truck when it struck the black car in which the women were in. 
 

Investigators said the driver who was killed was stopped at the intersection where a car was blocking her view. 

They said she pulled out onto Fallbrook Drive when the teen slammed into the car. 

The sheriff's office said he may have been speeding but there was no way for him to avoid the accident. 

Investigators said he had the right of way and the black car pulled out in front of him. 

Another one of the victims, Edwina was a beloved educator at Aldine ISD's Keeble Pre-K. 


 

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On 3/8/2019 at 2:06 PM, urbanize713 said:

Love the development, hate that the power lines were not buried. If the City wont do it, why don't they ask the developer to do it as an improvement on these new builds? Anyone have any insight? 

It's not up to the City to bury power lines. The City doesn't own them, Centerpoint does. Any decision to bury power lines has to be between the developer and Centerpoint. I know there are high voltage lines buried in some streets, LaBranch has a 140,000 volt line running along the West side of the street through Midtown, it had to be tapped when they started up the substation at Tuam and LaBranch. That would probably prevent burial of the regular lines.

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On 4/19/2019 at 8:50 AM, dbigtex56 said:

Still, the rebuilding of Elgin St from Main St to Brazos St was a window of opportunity that is now closed. Now that that seemingly endless project has been completed, it's unlikely that anyone will propose digging it up to add underground utilities in the foreseeable future. 


Perhaps I spoke too soon.
Elgin (eastbound) already has a pothole large enough to cause a major THUD! if someone is careless enough to hit it (which the 82 Westheimer unfailingly does).
If only they had stretched the job out a few more years, and done it right....

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welcome-image-blue.png

^^^ welcome to the HAIF forum @X.R.  we're happy that you are here...

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, X.R. said:

From their FB page, if no one has posted it yet:

 

 

Gonna be reaaaal interesting to see how busy that WF gets. WF is generally too expensive for my blood, but their hot food to go can be had for under 10 dollars a plate, which would make it a decent option for a quick dinner or something. I wonder if the foot traffic in that area will expand or not.

 

This is how it felt to go into a Whole Foods for the first time when looking for the familiar grocery brands.

 

 

$_32.JPG

Edited by Timoric
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16 hours ago, X.R. said:

Gonna be reaaaal interesting to see how busy that WF gets. WF is generally too expensive for my blood, but their hot food to go can be had for under 10 dollars a plate, which would make it a decent option for a quick dinner or something. I wonder if the foot traffic in that area will expand or not.

 

I used to go to WF (W Dallas) for fresh food/salads on occasion or specialty items, but would never imagine shopping their regularly. The other day I went to the one on Bellaire (moved out there a year ago, its 5 minutes from my house but my go to place is the new Bellaire HEB) for the first time, and saw some amazing Prime member deals. Then I get 10% off with the app, and another 5% on my amazon credit card. I still don't think I will go there for full shopping regularly, but I am going to start going there more often given the prices and deals I saw.

 

As for midtown, I'm hoping they do well and attract walkers/bikers. When I lived on the other side of midtown I would go to Randall's solely due to location and lack of options. Though if I was going to jump in my car I would just drive over to disco Kroger. Now hopefully Whole Foods will be a good option and include enough reasonable deals on items to attract those who think they can't afford it.

 

Another item that may attract people, hopefully they will have a good tap selection. I also discovered good prices for growler fills at WF and some unique beers.

 

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I live within walking distance of this (4 long blocks), drive right by it on my way home from work when I take IH 10 home. I also have Prime and their Amazon card, so I will be checking them out much more often. Probably won't be my everyday store but definitely will shop there more often due to the convenience.

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My condo is a street over from the one on Post Oak and i go there often for the food bar and pre packaged foods and yep, the bakery (darn them)...sometimes even go to the bar area with friends...however, i too have to go to Randalls a block away to do regular grocery shopping so i can relate to that cartoon above haha! 

I hope this new Whole Foods location does well...it certainly looks nice and seems to be needed in the area for those that are healthy and want something convenient to walk to etc...

 

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I think the location is great for the WF.  They will get local folks of course, but I imagine they will get loads of people going home from work down Smith on the way to the spur.  

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12 minutes ago, htownproud said:

I think the location is great for the WF.  They will get local folks of course, but I imagine they will get loads of people going home from work down Smith on the way to the spur.  

 

For the local folks, I think that WF is gonna get a looot of traffic from the Montrose people right across the highway. Its a 5-6 min walk for all those people living in the apartments in Montrose on W. Alabama. If its get a lunch crowd, and/or maintains a steady dose of people, I can see other "health" oriented businesses moving close by to take advantage of people walking to and from.

 

Hell, Turkey Leg Hut isn't even healthy but their success on Almeda is causing so much overflow that you've had healthy food/retail pop ups on the weekends, foot traffic is nuts. I can see something similar happening with this WF.

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https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Pearl-Marketplace-opens-in-Midtown-Whole-Foods-13968634.php?utm_campaign=CMS Sharing Tools (Premium)&utm_source=t.co&utm_medium=referral

 

It appears it did open today.

 

Quote

Houston-based apartment developer Morgan has started leasing units at Pearl Marketplace in Midtown, the company's latest mixed-use project in the urban core.

 

Quote

Units will range from 561-square-foot studios priced at $1,715 per month to 1,442-square-foot two-bedroom units that rent for $3,710. The landlord is offering two months of free rent and waiving security deposits, according to the property's Facebook page.

 

Quote

Residents at Pearl Marketplace will have private elevator access to the grocery store, as well as co-working space, an Uber waiting lounge and kayak and bike storage.

 

Quote

The Whole Foods store is expected to open during the first quarter of next year.

 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/30/2019 at 12:53 PM, X.R. said:

 

For the local folks, I think that WF is gonna get a looot of traffic from the Montrose people right across the highway. Its a 5-6 min walk for all those people living in the apartments in Montrose on W. Alabama. If its get a lunch crowd, and/or maintains a steady dose of people, I can see other "health" oriented businesses moving close by to take advantage of people walking to and from.

 

Hell, Turkey Leg Hut isn't even healthy but their success on Almeda is causing so much overflow that you've had healthy food/retail pop ups on the weekends, foot traffic is nuts. I can see something similar happening with this WF.

Turkey Legs Hut is insane. There are three or four parking lots where they're charging ten dollars just to park to eat at Turkey Hut. There's a line every time I go by day and night, similar to Breakfast Club.

Edited by bobruss
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6 minutes ago, bobruss said:

Turkey Legs Hut is insane. There are three or four parking lots where they're charging ten dollars just to park to eat at Turkey Hut. There's a line every time I go by day and night, similar to Breakfast Club.

 

 

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@bobruss i have been told by many pals that the "food at the TURKEY LEG HUT is incredible!"  apparently, this is the sole reason that their respective patronage is so very remarkable.  although i have yet to get there per se... it is on my bucket list...

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5 hours ago, wilcal said:
 

The Whole Foods store is expected to open during the first quarter of next year.

 

That's a couple of quarters later than I'd expected.
Disappointed!

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Its smart by WF to hold of a bit, until the Pearl and the other two projects in midtown get closer to completion and gaining leasees. A robust and already established customer-base right there.

 

But it kind of sucks for everyone else, including the Pearl since the big selling point (to me) is that you can do your grocery shopping where you live. 

Edited by X.R.
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