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39-Story High-Rise Development at 1660 Post Oak Blvd.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Luminare said:

 

Are you telling me this...

 

ZDZDAFN.jpg

 

Looks better than this?

 

0lPxIGD.jpg

 

Did I, at any point, mention the new concrete or trees? No. The new pavement and trees is quite the improvement actually. Buses are not sexy and giving them a designated lane is nothing more than putting lipstick on a pig. A bus is a bus is a bus and I highly doubt these BRT lanes will move the numbers of people being projected. Most people don't ride buses -- especially in a city built for the car. Why we don't focus our attention on commuter rail is beyond me. I'm really not even a fan of light rail. God knows the one from downtown to the dome will shake the dirt from your shoes. I realize it's not financially savvy to sell commuter rail but putting in a useless lane for a rolling eyesore is a shame. Of course, many of you won't agree and that's okay. Personally, they should stop why they're ahead and transition these designated lanes into bikes and foot traffic areas. 

Edited by wxman
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The main reason why the bottom picture looks better than the top is because the Cosmo is obscured by the new.... what's this project called again?

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I love the new BLVD and yes rail would have been better...the rumor was always that years from now the bus lane area could be transformed into a rail feature (as the general look and feel certainly already resembles one). i guess we shall see but again, love the way it looks and agree that now that is is done (or almost), it is attracting more great projects for Uptown! 

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12 hours ago, wxman said:

 

 I highly doubt these BRT lanes will move the numbers of people being projected.

 

What numbers are being projected?

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I love the wide, brick sidewalks in the bottom picture.  That should be the standard sidewalk design, not the traditional three feet concrete sidewalk that is most common.  Wide sidewalks are far more inviting and attractive than narrow sidewalks.

 

I agree with wxman that buses are not attractive and will not attract as many riders as trains.  There is still a stigma attached to them in most of the United States.  Taking the bus as an adult makes people think you can't afford a car.  Trains are different.  They are considered modern and a symbol of big, dense, rich cities.  They offer a smoother ride than buses, especially considering Houston's streets and the notoriously potholed right lanes.  Train routes can be memorized and visualized better than a bus route.  Their fixed routes attract development in a way that bus routes do not.

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Although rail is supposedly innovative and  sexier, if I’m really being honest with myself, I love the fact that we have the BRT lanes and new streetscape WITHOUT all the overhead electric wiring that comes with light rail. I personally think that’s unattractive.
 

10-15 years ago I was one of the main proponents of light but after having lived around it downtown and midtown for years, there’s nothing really “light” about it. Whenever I’m near it and the Metrorail approaches, feels like simple heavy train tracks to me and certainly doesn’t feel safe for pedestrians walking nearby (especially on Friday/Saturday nights when many of those pedestrians are slightly inebriated).

 

I’ve also lived in Atlanta and I prefer the RAPID heavy rail - separated from traffic, separated from pedestrians - that moves people quickly around the city to jobs and out to the airport.
 

I personally don’t care if they ever build another light rail line in Houston unless we use it more like heavy rail (which is possible)! It should not travel from midtown down Richmond Ave to the Galleria with 10-15 stops it should travel 50mph  down the old abandoned rail lines along Westpark with a single stop (or 2) near Greenway Plaza. RAPID TRANSIT! 
 

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The City typically requires 5' sidewalks, or 6' sidewalks on transit streets and state highways: https://www.houstontx.gov/planning/_urban/2009_763.pdf

 

And the thing about the stigma against buses: I'm not convinced it will carry over to a true BRT line like this one. This *is* a fixed route- a lot of new infrastructure is being put in place to support it, most of which is highly visible. Even if you don't see a bus you can recognize this as a transit line. And again, BRT, when fully implemented, has had a lot of success: https://usa.streetsblog.org/2018/11/05/checking-in-on-americas-pioneering-bus-rapid-transit-systems/

 

Given the general weirdness of this part of town, I am honestly still a little concerned about initial ridership though. I am way more confident that the University/Richmond corridor (and even the limited stop I-10 line) will be incredibly successful, which should also increase ridership on this line. And of course, if the HSR station gets built...

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13 hours ago, wxman said:

 

Did I, at any point, mention the new concrete or trees? No. The new pavement and trees is quite the improvement actually. Buses are not sexy and giving them a designated lane is nothing more than putting lipstick on a pig. A bus is a bus is a bus and I highly doubt these BRT lanes will move the numbers of people being projected. Most people don't ride buses -- especially in a city built for the car. Why we don't focus our attention on commuter rail is beyond me. I'm really not even a fan of light rail. God knows the one from downtown to the dome will shake the dirt from your shoes. I realize it's not financially savvy to sell commuter rail but putting in a useless lane for a rolling eyesore is a shame. Of course, many of you won't agree and that's okay. Personally, they should stop why they're ahead and transition these designated lanes into bikes and foot traffic areas. 

 

This is what people mean when they saying one is "moving the goal post". You flat out said that BRT is "blight", but then you conceded that the new concrete and trees were "quite the improvement actually". I'm glad we got some clarification on that. With that being said maybe 30% of this is the BRT line itself which is about 30% of the project that you don't like. That leaves about 70% which is the sidewalks, trees, and concrete which in your own words would mean that this project was at least a 70% improvement wouldn't you say? Is anything ever 100% in terms of improvement? Are you really going to say that the 30% which you believe to be a "blight" makes the rest of this a "blight" even though you say the rest is an improvement, which is the majority of the project? I don't necessarily like BRT either, but we don't live in a perfect world where we magically get whatever we want. You can claim from above that this isn't how things should be, but down here is a world where the only things that get done are through compromises which are really difficult to get done. I'm not even saying that there isn't a discussion to be had about whether LRT should have been here or not, but to look at this final product, even though you concede that the majority of it is an improvement, yet because you don't like BRT, so you declare it to be a blight is non-argument, and is ridiculous hyperbole. If this gets us closer to one day this being LRT then fantastic. These improvements are always step by step processes. Fine its a 70% improvement. I'll take that because its way better than 0%. This is at least workable than what was there before. You have every right to complain about the 30% you don't like, but I recommend you actually give credit where credit is due to the parts which you agree yourself make this area better than to be so vague as to call it all a blight.

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Houston's rail lines are remarkably slow.  The Red Line slows way down when going around a turn such as the one near Old Spanish Train and Fannin.  Grade-separated rail lines are the gold standard for rapid transit because there's no risk of being delayed from a vehicle accident on the tracks and there's more flexibility in routes.  Grade-separated lines also preserve car lanes.  However, ridership takes a hit by forcing commuters to walk up stairs to elevated platforms.  Has there ever been talk of an elevated train line in Houston?

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Posted (edited)

Yes there was lots of talk and plans of a Monorail in Houston way back in the 80s when Kathy Whitmire was mayor. I believe we even had a vote on it, which failed. 

Edited by Stone
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8 minutes ago, Stone said:

Yes there was lots of talk and plans of a Monorail in Houston way back in the 80s when Kathy Whitmire was mayor. I believe we even had a vote on it, which failed. 

 

Pretty sure the only "vote" we had on the monorail plan was when we voted to remove Whitmire from office. 

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Obviously BRT in a vacuum isn't as good as light rail (and by that same token, light rail isn't nearly as good as heavy rail), but it's still an improvement over what we have and given that Metro has apparently given up on building the University Line as rail, it wouldn't make as much sense to build a rail section on Post Oak without connecting it to the network. 

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6 hours ago, Highrise Tower said:

DusSUqd.jpg

 

I like the dark glass they are using. Contrasts well with the brightly colored abomination behind it.

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It maybe an unpopular opinion but I like the green on the cosmo. It’s a color that isn’t used as much and I wish it was. Lord knows we have a billion blue grey glass buildings.

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^^^ holy mother!  this is one seriously IMPOSING structure.  once it reaches it's full height, it will be second in command throughout UPTOWN... only to WILLIAMS TOWER .

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On 5/13/2020 at 9:31 PM, wxman said:

 

Did I, at any point, mention the new concrete or trees? No. The new pavement and trees is quite the improvement actually. Buses are not sexy and giving them a designated lane is nothing more than putting lipstick on a pig. A bus is a bus is a bus and I highly doubt these BRT lanes will move the numbers of people being projected. Most people don't ride buses -- especially in a city built for the car. Why we don't focus our attention on commuter rail is beyond me. I'm really not even a fan of light rail. God knows the one from downtown to the dome will shake the dirt from your shoes. I realize it's not financially savvy to sell commuter rail but putting in a useless lane for a rolling eyesore is a shame. Of course, many of you won't agree and that's okay. Personally, they should stop why they're ahead and transition these designated lanes into bikes and foot traffic areas. 

You compare this to putting lipstick on a pig? You’ve obviously never taken the bus enough to see the growing trend among young Houstonians like myself who use the bus system daily. You do realize the bus system is the core of any transit system across any major city across every continent, right? BRT is also being used globally and in U.S. cities like SF and Chicago. I don’t even know why I’m wasting my time explaining this to someone who doesn’t understand the basics. I could further my argument about how ridiculous you sound but I’d rather not. 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/14/2020 at 10:38 AM, Geographer said:

I love the wide, brick sidewalks in the bottom picture.  That should be the standard sidewalk design, not the traditional three feet concrete sidewalk that is most common.  Wide sidewalks are far more inviting and attractive than narrow sidewalks.

 

I agree with wxman that buses are not attractive and will not attract as many riders as trains.  There is still a stigma attached to them in most of the United States.  Taking the bus as an adult makes people think you can't afford a car.  Trains are different.  They are considered modern and a symbol of big, dense, rich cities.  They offer a smoother ride than buses, especially considering Houston's streets and the notoriously potholed right lanes.  Train routes can be memorized and visualized better than a bus route.  Their fixed routes attract development in a way that bus routes do not.

The problem is you don’t understand public transit. And your idea of transit is a train. In Chicago, a few of my friends take the bus like it’s second nature because they don’t look at transit the way you look at it. They take the train when necessary, but most travel is by foot or bus. If you actually used the system and understood it’s purpose and why you are using it then this idea that it has to be some shiny new train will begin to sound ridiculous. Inner city Houston is doing a great job creating a network that city buses feed off of with the Red Line as the spine of the network. And then connecting those lines with other modes of travel such as biking and walking. The 3 foot minimum for sidewalks is old infrastructure. So if you’re seeing that, it’s before the 5’ minimum for today’s development. Once the BRT line from Uptown to Downtown is built you’ll see ridership grow quickly. As for the argument about commuter rail. Commuter rail is just that, for commuters. The burbs are starting to realize they need and want that infrastructure. And politics aside, the bluer those areas become, the greater the topic becomes. 

Edited by j_cuevas713
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7 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

The problem is you don’t understand public transit. And your idea of transit is a train. In Chicago, a few of my friends take the bus like it’s second nature because they don’t look at transit the way you look at it. They take the train when necessary, but most travel is by foot or bus. If you actually used the system and understood it’s purpose and why you are using it then this idea that it has to be some shiny new train will begin to sound ridiculous. Inner city Houston is doing a great job creating a network that city buses feed off of with the Red Line as the spine of the network. And then connecting those lines with other modes of travel such as biking and walking. The 3 foot minimum for sidewalks is old infrastructure. So if you’re seeing that, it’s before the 5’ minimum for today’s development. Once the BRT line from Uptown to Downtown is built you’ll see ridership grow quickly. As for the argument about commuter rail. Commuter rail is just that, for commuters. The burbs are starting to realize they need and want that infrastructure. And politics aside, the bluer those areas become, the greater the topic becomes. 

 

Your correct. Mass Transit is an ecosystem. Not a one time bandaid. For one to work it needs to be a holistic system. It was the same when I would go frequently to Berlin. People walk. They take buses. They take trams. They take Trains. Its not just one mode of doing things. I also think that density, while important, is a bit of misnomer when it comes to successful transit. Yes the number of people is important, but what is really important is whatever transit ecosystem you set up it needs to take people to places they actually want to go. Picking up residents is actually secondary. If you can pick up people along the way then it just makes it better. Besides if transit actually goes somewhere then people move to the transit so they can use it more often. The car also comes into play as well. Its part of the ecosystem. There were cars that existed when we used to have trolleys that went places here in Houston. People just didn't maintain, and continue that system. They got lazy, and let it go by the way side.

I also don't think this is strictly a blue or red issue. I also don't think this is a rural or city issue either. More mobility is better for everyone no matter who you are. Great mobility is hallmark of a great democratic society. It should be something worth pushing for.

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10 hours ago, Luminare said:

.

I also don't think this is strictly a blue or red issue. I also don't think this is a rural or city issue either. More mobility is better for everyone no matter who you are. Great mobility is hallmark of a great democratic society. It should be something worth pushing for.

 

This is true but a lot of America loves to vote against their own best interests even if they don't know it. 

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mary-mother-of-god-png-15.png

 

^^^ HOLY MOTHER!  this is one gorgeous edifice.  one can only imagine just how its going to look once completed...

 

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I am glad for the photos> i can see this one from work as well as others and it is weird not seeing what may be the last one for the time being out the window. I have gotten to see ton go up in the Uptown area since I started this job five years ago.

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Posted (edited)

I drove by this weekend and it is such a presence and strong addition to that block. I love how it curves.

Edited by thatguysly
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The only thing I know about structural engineering is what I learned by osmosis after spending a night at the Boll Weevil Motor Inn, in Elba, Alabama, but an inquiring mind asks:  Do the columns taper as the building ascends or is it my imagination?  I could probably identify three or forces they have to deal with, but that's about as far as my knowledge base extends.  

CE852F07-5AB0-4814-B256-CA6AAC57393C.jpeg

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^^^ judging from the aforementioned/latest illustration, it seems as though the very top CAYDON like FINS, have become heightened... as well as a bit sharpened to boot... OUCH!  the ground floor retail GFR... seems a bit more defined as well.  is it just me, or does it seem that the overall edifice has become a bit more heightened as well...?  this latest rendering seems a bit taller for some reason.

 

nonetheless, i harbor a strong sense that this particular UPTOWN DISTRICT edifice shall become instantly ICONIC.  it shall also induce more upgraded development around it as well.  just wait and see...

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The only thing I know about structural engineering is what I learned by osmosis after spending a night at the Boll Weevil Motor Inn, in Elba, Alabama, but an inquiring mind asks:  Do the columns taper as the building ascends or is it my imagination?  I could probably identify three or forces they have to deal with, but that's about as far as my knowledge base extends.  

 

Concrete columns typically step by standard sizes, you could theoretically reduce each floor as your go up, but that would be cost prohibitive on formwork.  So the engineers look at the loads and give you blocks of floors by each column size, they also fiddle with reinforcing steel as you go up.

 

 

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Arabella was such a let down, this project has redeemed the residential high rise in uptown. Arabella is still cool but more of a what if. 

11 hours ago, Skyboxdweller said:

I am about to lose my view of the Upper Kirby District, but since I am both a voyeur and an exhibitionist, having neighbors living behind glass walls is a win/win for me. 😉

1F9FD72F-2F7E-442C-B576-C1748469A503.jpeg

Sand storm looks wild in this photo.

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