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The Carter Museum District: 20-Story Apartment Tower


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Thread should include the name the Carter.

 

 

Dallas-based StreetLights Residential, founded about three years ago by executives of Gables Residential, has broken ground on this 20-story apartment tower in the Museum District.

The building, which will be called The Carter, will have 305 units with one, two or three bedrooms.

The site, 4 Chelsea Boulevard, is between Montrose and Travis just south of U.S. 59.

“We pride ourselves on creating a luxury, hotel-like environment with each of our projects, and we believe the high-end amenities and multiple living options in this development achieve that vision,” CEO Doug Chesnut said in a statement.

Building amenities will include a swimming pool with lounging areas and fire pits, a 19th-floor lounge with a kitchen and dining area, a game room, fitness center, resident lobby bar, dog park and private garages. The units will have 10-foot ceilings, keyless entry systems, build-in speakers and stone countertops.

Gromatzky Dupree & Associates designed the building, which is being constructed by SLR Texas Construction on a nearly two-acre site.

Landscaping will be designed by Lynda Tycher & Associates.

The building is expected to be completed in 2017.

 

http://blog.chron.com/primeproperty/2014/10/museum-district-to-get-new-luxury-high-rise/

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They are calling it "The Carter?"  Seriously?  As in the name of the crack house project in New Jack City?  Brilliant.  That is maybe the greatest name for such a white bread place.  H-U-S-T-L-E-R Hustler. 

 

I really hope one of the developers is a fan of the movie and is having some fun with the name.  I'd love to say I live at The Carter.  This Carter, not the movie Carter.

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I am at a total loss why so many are finding the Carter gorgeous, beautiful, etc. No one using such words states why

they think it is so. So tell me... To me just another tall souless building, with lots of balcones, some extending out, and others

tucked in. No external details on bottom two floors and none at the top. Nothing that speaks to this area of the U.S.

and/or Texas.

 

Take a look at apartment houses, north of midtown, along the lake front in Chicago. Look at the apartment houses that were

built along the Grand Concourse in NYC's Bronx. Both utilize Art Deco to create corner windows, incredible mosaics, and

friezes in stone with a fine use of metal. Take a way the grand entrance, and the white at bottom and top... and you have a

tall public low income project of the type built in NYC, Chicago (where many have been imploded), St Louis (where the two

largest were imploded decades ago). This type building destroys communities and neigborhoods. If those who move into

this building or the others built in Montrose, are being built, and will be, walk in the area I will eat my car. The Montrose

was once and still is somewhat of a neighborhood, but throwing up these building in a radom way will, as Texasota said

on 01.03.2014, will wipe out perfect good 2 story buildings. So much talk about skylines. People live in buildings in (hopefully),

neigborhoods, not in/on skylines. And...what is there to see from the 20th floor of residence in Houston? Hills, valleys,

mountains, fields of green filled with wildflowers? Hell no...just flat ground and the tops of roofs...and for the lucky few...

Interstate overpasses. Brings to mind Jane Jocob's battle with Robert Moses which stopped him from building the expressway across

lower Manhattan, which would have destoryed a good part of Greenwich Village and other parts of Manhattan which had

buildings over 200 years old. They now are historic landmarks, which bring many tourists and $$$, to NYC. Rare that anything

is not torn down in Houston after 20 years.

 

Been in Houston 20 years, and always hear, "We are not some other large city like NYC, we are Houston, and damn proud of

its NO ZONING. Yet in many above comments individuals are awaiting the Manhattaning of Houston. At this point more individuals

live in non-Houston Harris County, than within Houston city limits, and the number is growing rapidly, as the middle class family

is being forced out of areas where they have lived for over a 100 years. Houston is already in financial trouble, and will have to

cut back on vital services: health, education, police and fire assistance, or grab more land to get the taxes it needs/will need.

Yes, density is important, but so is the ability to get somewhere like school, work, church, and this indiscriminate plopping of

buildings will make driving in Houston only worst. The Carter and others such projects is just greed on the part of developers.

They all scream it is so expensive to buildin Mid-Town or Downtown, and are getting Houstonian's tax money as rebates to build.

Sick greed. Cannot afford to build in these areas, well then build where you can afford to. No one is giving me money for projects

I would like to do, but cannot afford to.

 

Yea... beautifu, gorgeous!  Cannot wait to see it. LOL.

Edited by washave-2007-2015
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I am at a total loss why so many are finding the Carter gorgeous, beautiful, etc. No one using such words states why

they think it is so. So tell me... To me just another tall souless building, with lots of balcones, some extending out, and others

tucked in. No external details on bottom two floors and none at the top. Nothing that speaks to this area of the U.S.

and/or Texas.

 

Take a look at apartment houses, north of midtown, along the lake front in Chicago. Look at the apartment houses that were

built along the Grand Concourse in NYC's Bronx. Both utilize Art Deco to create corner windows, incredible mosaics, and

friezes in stone with a fine use of metal. Take a way the grand entrance, and the white at bottom and top... and you have a

tall public low income project of the type built in NYC, Chicago (where many have been imploded), St Louis (where the two

largest were imploded decades ago). This type building destroys communities and neigborhoods. If those who move into

this building or the others built in Montrose, are being built, and will be, walk in the area I will eat my car. The Montrose

was once and still is somewhat of a neighborhood, but throwing up these building in a radom way will, as Texasota said

on 01.03.2014, will wipe out perfect good 2 story buildings. So much talk about skylines. People live in buildings in (hopefully),

neigborhoods, not in/on skylines. And...what is there to see from the 20th floor of residence in Houston? Hills, valleys,

mountains, fields of green filled with wildflowers? Hell no...just flat ground and the tops of roofs...and for the lucky few...

Interstate overpasses. Brings to mind Jane Jocob's battle with Robert Moses which stopped him from building the expressway across

lower Manhattan, which would have destoryed a good part of Greenwich Village and other parts of Manhattan which had

buildings over 200 years old. They now are historic landmarks, which bring many tourists and $$$, to NYC. Rare that anything

is not torn down in Houston after 20 years.

 

Been in Houston 20 years, and always hear, "We are not some other large city like NYC, we are Houston, and damn proud of

its NO ZONING. Yet in many above comments individuals are awaiting the Manhattaning of Houston. At this point more individuals

live in non-Houston Harris County, than within Houston city limits, and the number is growing rapidly, as the middle class family

is being forced out of areas where they have lived for over a 100 years. Houston is already in financial trouble, and will have to

cut back on vital services: health, education, police and fire assistance, or grab more land to get the taxes it needs/will need.

Yes, density is important, but so is the ability to get somewhere like school, work, church, and this indiscriminate plopping of

buildings will make driving in Houston only worst. The Carter and others such projects is just greed on the part of developers.

They all scream it is so expensive to buildin Mid-Town or Downtown, and are getting Houstonian's tax money as rebates to build.

Sick greed. Cannot afford to build in these areas, well then build where you can afford to. No one is giving me money for projects

I would like to do, but cannot afford to.

 

Yea... beautifu, gorgeous!  Cannot wait to see it. LOL.

 

I think it is beautiful primarily because it looks beautiful.  

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I am at a total loss why so many are finding the Carter gorgeous, beautiful, etc. No one using such words states why

they think it is so. So tell me... To me just another tall souless building, with lots of balcones, some extending out, and others

tucked in. No external details on bottom two floors and none at the top. Nothing that speaks to this area of the U.S.

and/or Texas.

 

Take a look at apartment houses, north of midtown, along the lake front in Chicago. Look at the apartment houses that were

built along the Grand Concourse in NYC's Bronx. Both utilize Art Deco to create corner windows, incredible mosaics, and

friezes in stone with a fine use of metal. Take a way the grand entrance, and the white at bottom and top... and you have a

tall public low income project of the type built in NYC, Chicago (where many have been imploded), St Louis (where the two

largest were imploded decades ago). This type building destroys communities and neigborhoods. If those who move into

this building or the others built in Montrose, are being built, and will be, walk in the area I will eat my car. The Montrose

was once and still is somewhat of a neighborhood, but throwing up these building in a radom way will, as Texasota said

on 01.03.2014, will wipe out perfect good 2 story buildings. So much talk about skylines. People live in buildings in (hopefully),

neigborhoods, not in/on skylines. And...what is there to see from the 20th floor of residence in Houston? Hills, valleys,

mountains, fields of green filled with wildflowers? Hell no...just flat ground and the tops of roofs...and for the lucky few...

Interstate overpasses. Brings to mind Jane Jocob's battle with Robert Moses which stopped him from building the expressway across

lower Manhattan, which would have destoryed a good part of Greenwich Village and other parts of Manhattan which had

buildings over 200 years old. They now are historic landmarks, which bring many tourists and $$$, to NYC. Rare that anything

is not torn down in Houston after 20 years.

 

Been in Houston 20 years, and always hear, "We are not some other large city like NYC, we are Houston, and damn proud of

its NO ZONING. Yet in many above comments individuals are awaiting the Manhattaning of Houston. At this point more individuals

live in non-Houston Harris County, than within Houston city limits, and the number is growing rapidly, as the middle class family

is being forced out of areas where they have lived for over a 100 years. Houston is already in financial trouble, and will have to

cut back on vital services: health, education, police and fire assistance, or grab more land to get the taxes it needs/will need.

Yes, density is important, but so is the ability to get somewhere like school, work, church, and this indiscriminate plopping of

buildings will make driving in Houston only worst. The Carter and others such projects is just greed on the part of developers.

They all scream it is so expensive to buildin Mid-Town or Downtown, and are getting Houstonian's tax money as rebates to build.

Sick greed. Cannot afford to build in these areas, well then build where you can afford to. No one is giving me money for projects

I would like to do, but cannot afford to.

 

Yea... beautifu, gorgeous!  Cannot wait to see it. LOL.

 

scrooge-icon.jpg?w=284&h=284

did you ever ask ebenezer scrooge.. just why on earth did he ever become ebenezer scrooge?

good question huh...

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I am at a total loss why so many are finding the Carter gorgeous, beautiful, etc. No one using such words states why

they think it is so. So tell me... To me just another tall souless building, with lots of balcones, some extending out, and others

tucked in. No external details on bottom two floors and none at the top. Nothing that speaks to this area of the U.S.

and/or Texas.

 

Take a look at apartment houses, north of midtown, along the lake front in Chicago. Look at the apartment houses that were

built along the Grand Concourse in NYC's Bronx. Both utilize Art Deco to create corner windows, incredible mosaics, and

friezes in stone with a fine use of metal. Take a way the grand entrance, and the white at bottom and top... and you have a

tall public low income project of the type built in NYC, Chicago (where many have been imploded), St Louis (where the two

largest were imploded decades ago). This type building destroys communities and neigborhoods. If those who move into

this building or the others built in Montrose, are being built, and will be, walk in the area I will eat my car. The Montrose

was once and still is somewhat of a neighborhood, but throwing up these building in a radom way will, as Texasota said

on 01.03.2014, will wipe out perfect good 2 story buildings. So much talk about skylines. People live in buildings in (hopefully),

neigborhoods, not in/on skylines. And...what is there to see from the 20th floor of residence in Houston? Hills, valleys,

mountains, fields of green filled with wildflowers? Hell no...just flat ground and the tops of roofs...and for the lucky few...

Interstate overpasses. Brings to mind Jane Jocob's battle with Robert Moses which stopped him from building the expressway across

lower Manhattan, which would have destoryed a good part of Greenwich Village and other parts of Manhattan which had

buildings over 200 years old. They now are historic landmarks, which bring many tourists and $$$, to NYC. Rare that anything

is not torn down in Houston after 20 years.

 

Been in Houston 20 years, and always hear, "We are not some other large city like NYC, we are Houston, and damn proud of

its NO ZONING. Yet in many above comments individuals are awaiting the Manhattaning of Houston. At this point more individuals

live in non-Houston Harris County, than within Houston city limits, and the number is growing rapidly, as the middle class family

is being forced out of areas where they have lived for over a 100 years. Houston is already in financial trouble, and will have to

cut back on vital services: health, education, police and fire assistance, or grab more land to get the taxes it needs/will need.

Yes, density is important, but so is the ability to get somewhere like school, work, church, and this indiscriminate plopping of

buildings will make driving in Houston only worst. The Carter and others such projects is just greed on the part of developers.

They all scream it is so expensive to buildin Mid-Town or Downtown, and are getting Houstonian's tax money as rebates to build.

Sick greed. Cannot afford to build in these areas, well then build where you can afford to. No one is giving me money for projects

I would like to do, but cannot afford to.

 

Yea... beautifu, gorgeous!  Cannot wait to see it. LOL.

 

A demolition I would attend.

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washave-2007-2015,

 

I think there should be a hell of a lot more zoning than there is, but it's not completely black and white. No zoning has some benefits, no doubt...but overall, I think there should be much better planning. I see your point, but I don't mind this development because it looks terrific (and so does the landscaping on the front side), and it blends in well with the Museum Tower. There's nothing particularly flashy that stands out more than other buildings, but it's still very nice.

 

I don't see your point about basically "requiring" natural beauty to have a good view. Man has made some pretty spectacular skylines, and Houston's is one of the best in the world. The views from the Park Plaza area looking towards downtown are spectacular, but I think it was Bob Hope who once said that the view from the Warwick Towers facing towards Hermann Park and the med center was his favorite view on Earth. So there is that.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I am at a total loss why so many are finding the Carter gorgeous, beautiful, etc. No one using such words states why

they think it is so. So tell me... To me just another tall souless building, with lots of balcones, some extending out, and others

tucked in. No external details on bottom two floors and none at the top. Nothing that speaks to this area of the U.S.

and/or Texas.

 

Take a look at apartment houses, north of midtown, along the lake front in Chicago. Look at the apartment houses that were

built along the Grand Concourse in NYC's Bronx. Both utilize Art Deco to create corner windows, incredible mosaics, and

friezes in stone with a fine use of metal. Take a way the grand entrance, and the white at bottom and top... and you have a

tall public low income project of the type built in NYC, Chicago (where many have been imploded), St Louis (where the two

largest were imploded decades ago). This type building destroys communities and neigborhoods. If those who move into

this building or the others built in Montrose, are being built, and will be, walk in the area I will eat my car. The Montrose

was once and still is somewhat of a neighborhood, but throwing up these building in a radom way will, as Texasota said

on 01.03.2014, will wipe out perfect good 2 story buildings. So much talk about skylines. People live in buildings in (hopefully),

neigborhoods, not in/on skylines. And...what is there to see from the 20th floor of residence in Houston? Hills, valleys,

mountains, fields of green filled with wildflowers? Hell no...just flat ground and the tops of roofs...and for the lucky few...

Interstate overpasses. Brings to mind Jane Jocob's battle with Robert Moses which stopped him from building the expressway across

lower Manhattan, which would have destoryed a good part of Greenwich Village and other parts of Manhattan which had

buildings over 200 years old. They now are historic landmarks, which bring many tourists and $$$, to NYC. Rare that anything

is not torn down in Houston after 20 years.

 

Been in Houston 20 years, and always hear, "We are not some other large city like NYC, we are Houston, and damn proud of

its NO ZONING. Yet in many above comments individuals are awaiting the Manhattaning of Houston. At this point more individuals

live in non-Houston Harris County, than within Houston city limits, and the number is growing rapidly, as the middle class family

is being forced out of areas where they have lived for over a 100 years. Houston is already in financial trouble, and will have to

cut back on vital services: health, education, police and fire assistance, or grab more land to get the taxes it needs/will need.

Yes, density is important, but so is the ability to get somewhere like school, work, church, and this indiscriminate plopping of

buildings will make driving in Houston only worst. The Carter and others such projects is just greed on the part of developers.

They all scream it is so expensive to buildin Mid-Town or Downtown, and are getting Houstonian's tax money as rebates to build.

Sick greed. Cannot afford to build in these areas, well then build where you can afford to. No one is giving me money for projects

I would like to do, but cannot afford to.

 

Yea... beautifu, gorgeous!  Cannot wait to see it. LOL.

 

I agree that incredible mosaics, stone friezes, and details that relate to this region of the country would be nice, but we are simply not living in an era when that is commonly done on high-rise buildings. Of course it can still be done, but it will generally be very expensive, come out looking very bad, or both. When those buildings in NYC and Chicago were built in the 1930's, skilled labor for stone carving was much cheaper, stone itself was much cheaper, and architects were trained to work in those styles. Most buildings today that try to imitate historical detail come out looking awful, because only a handful of people in the world actually know how to do it, and they are unaffordable for a project like this. It's usually best to swim with the tide and design in the styles of your own era.

 

As to the comparison with low income highrises, that's really an exaggeration. Functionalist design can be done well or poorly (just like historical ornament), and in this case, I think it is done well.

 

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  • The title was changed to The Carter Museum District: 20-Story Apartment Tower

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