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Purpledevil

The Eagle responds to Arrow flip

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Not unexpectedly, Cox Classic Hits duo 106.9/107.5 The Eagle has adjusted its own playlist and is now being promoted as "Houston's Only Classic Rock Station, The Eagle".

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I assumed they had been circling The Arrow for that title, just waiting for CC to kill the format so they could take it

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Both have been terrible. Unless you like hearing the same songs played over and over and over and over. 

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My problem with both stations is you could almost predict what songs they were Going to play next.

I May be wrong, but I suspect there were more than a few hundred songs that were hits during that era.

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That's fine with me. The radio in this city really needs to be shaken up a bit. I'm still surprised that there is absolutely no electronic music to choose from aside from Soular Grooves on Saturday nights. And how does the Buzz get away with calling themselves "Houston's new rock alternative" while playing "new" 20 year old Pearl Jam and Nirvana?

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^Well... we do not have an actual Rock station.  And I've been really disappointed that 94.5 seems to be playing quite a bit more of the music that is now quite common on 96.5 and even 95.7.  Hopefully they'll start playing more rock and alternative rock.

 

I never understood why we had two classic rock station - sad to see it go for an urban station (wishing it was a rock or classical or some other under played variety) but like Greens said:  We need to shake things up here; for such a large city Houston really has some p*ss poor radio!

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^Well... we do not have an actual Rock station.  And I've been really disappointed that 94.5 seems to be playing quite a bit more of the music that is now quite common on 96.5 and even 95.7.  Hopefully they'll start playing more rock and alternative rock.

 

I never understood why we had two classic rock station - sad to see it go for an urban station (wishing it was a rock or classical or some other under played variety) but like Greens said:  We need to shake things up here; for such a large city Houston really has some p*ss poor radio!

 

How about a good jazz station?  There was one for a while about a decade ago but it only lasted a few years.

 

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Sure, yes, why not?  We're really lacking in quality radio here in Houston.  Thank goodness for MP3s and even the good old CD, or my commutes would be rather dull just listening to commercials, old songs listed as "current/new" and the same song on the same station(s) 6 times a day (if not more often).

 

Sad indeed.

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Sure, yes, why not?  We're really lacking in quality radio here in Houston.  Thank goodness for MP3s and even the good old CD, or my commutes would be rather dull just listening to commercials, old songs listed as "current/new" and the same song on the same station(s) 6 times a day (if not more often).

 

Sad indeed.

 

Long-term, I have to wonder if over-the-air radio will be supplanted by internet-delivered radio.  I already find I listen to pandora far more than I listen to local radio.

 

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^More than likely, yes it will be supplanted.  Radio as our grandparents knew it will eventually disapear.  And I'll bet that is something no one would have bothered predicting even as recently as the 1990s.  The internet, or more correctly, the advent of wireless connectivity will drive standard radio out and allow new subscriber based stations (that play a lot more music) will take over.

 

The only question I have is:  How long until even subscriber based services start to squeeze in commercials to their playtime?  I'll bet it won't be too long.

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^More than likely, yes it will be supplanted.  Radio as our grandparents knew it will eventually disapear.  And I'll bet that is something no one would have bothered predicting even as recently as the 1990s.  The internet, or more correctly, the advent of wireless connectivity will drive standard radio out and allow new subscriber based stations (that play a lot more music) will take over.

 

The only question I have is:  How long until even subscriber based services start to squeeze in commercials to their playtime?  I'll bet it won't be too long.

 

The free versions already do.  On Pandora it's not too bad.  The visual ads are always there, but the audio ones only come on every 5 to 10 songs (or so it seems, I'll have to count it next time to be sure).  One ad and then back to the songs.  I can handle that.  If I want truely ad-free, I've got a large mp3 collection divided into playlists and I just set those to random play.  I've got sattelite in one of my vehicles, but let the subscripton lapse because I can get as good or better enjoyment from the playlists.  Might try Pandora via verizon jetpack on a trip sometime just to see how it does.  Sooner or later, though, I suspect all cars will have cell service built in.

 

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^More than likely, yes it will be supplanted.  Radio as our grandparents knew it will eventually disapear.  And I'll bet that is something no one would have bothered predicting even as recently as the 1990s.  The internet, or more correctly, the advent of wireless connectivity will drive standard radio out and allow new subscriber based stations (that play a lot more music) will take over.

 

My guess would be that FM radio won't disappear, not in our lifetimes, any more than AM radio, landlines, physical books, CDs, DVDs, or other superseded technologies have disappeared.  What I expect will happen though is that FM radio content will become increasingly marginal, and over time drift from trying to appeal to mass markets to target niche markets and those who might be more elderly, poor or less educated.  In other words, an echo of what happened to AM radio back decades ago.  There will remain a sizable core of listeners who won't switch to internet-based radio, or who will use both internet and broadcast radio depending on their mood. 

 

Another parallel is cable tv.  Although lots of people are getting rid of it, I think a lot of people will use both internet and cable tv.

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