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Camden Conte: 21-Stories x2 (2 Phases) - Downtown


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Snapped this the other day. Slightly wonky since I had to photomerge a multiple photos to get the entire building in the shot.

Camden announced phase I is a go on their earnings call. Should kick off Q4-2017. It'll be 21 stories, as discussed here.   They have no definite plans for phase II.  

The clouds showed up the one time i managed to get downtown... Nevertheless, here are a few shots.          

Posted Images

7 hours ago, BeerNut said:

I still think a UNIQLO store would be a better fit for our downtown.  

I’ll take it.  In fact, I would be happy with just about any store that sells clothing,

 

target?  Sure

nieman marcus?  Sure

tj Max?   Yep.

saks?  Yep.

 

up and down the price points, i’ll Take it.

 

millions have been spent on Dallas street improvements.  So far, nothing.

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11 hours ago, cspwal said:

 

 

Seems a tad expensive

And ugly.

 

you may have found the ugliest and most expensive garment in the place.  That said, I think that the store is on the expensive side.  But the clothing skews “young man” and it seems that between midtown and downtown we have quite a few of them who likely also have a bit of disposable income.

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Traditional non-food retail, especially large format clothing stores, is in a bad place right now. Online shopping is wreaking havoc and most companies are uneasy about building new stores. We might just have to wait a little while. I personally wonder if a Houston Center makeover (planned by Brookfield) might land some street-facing retailers before Dallas Street. There are more wallets in that area, fewer homeless, and a probably a better physical layout than the wall of parking garages on Dallas Street.

 

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3 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

Traditional non-food retail, especially large format clothing stores, is in a bad place right now. Online shopping is wreaking havoc and most companies are uneasy about building new stores. We might just have to wait a little while. I personally wonder if a Houston Center makeover (planned by Brookfield) might land some street-facing retailers before Dallas Street. There are more wallets in that area, fewer homeless, and a probably a better physical layout than the wall of parking garages on Dallas Street.

 

You are right about retail but I know Sephora is actively looking for new locations in Houston as we speak. Dry Bar would be  great  downtown.  Target is a no brainer. Apple or Microsoft would be nice. I think pottery barn or west elm would do well for furnishing these new apartments and homes in the area. Your thoughts? 

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3 minutes ago, HOUCAJUN said:

You are right about retail but I know Sephora is actively looking for new locations in Houston as we speak. Dry Bar would be  great  downtown.  Target is a no brainer. Apple or Microsoft would be nice. I think pottery barn or west elm would do well for furnishing these new apartments and homes in the area. Your thoughts? 

 

My thoughts... Target would establish the neighborhood for retail and other stores could then piggyback. A retailer feels safe going into a neighborhood with an "anchor" like Target. Also Greenstreet is fortunately or unfortunately the barometer that I think other brands will use to gauge downtown. That it wasn't built in the best format or location is in the past now, it needs to do well if we want to see other stuff happen.

 

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7 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

My thoughts... Target would establish the neighborhood for retail and other stores could then piggyback. A retailer feels safe going into a neighborhood with an "anchor" like Target. Also Greenstreet is fortunately or unfortunately the barometer that I think other brands will use to gauge downtown. That it wasn't built in the best format or location is in the past now, it needs to do well if we want to see other stuff happen.

 

 

With the apartments on the South Side of downtown...

 

camden's

skyhouses + houston

the 2 church midrises

 

I think this will bring alot of people to the overall population that can 'insulate' the market area for Greenstreet and other future retail. The more density, the more of a need that will be apparent.

 

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1 hour ago, HOUCAJUN said:

You are right about retail but I know Sephora is actively looking for new locations in Houston as we speak. Dry Bar would be  great  downtown.  Target is a no brainer. Apple or Microsoft would be nice. I think pottery barn or west elm would do well for furnishing these new apartments and homes in the area. Your thoughts? 

I think all of those are very likely if the city can push for it. Wth ever happened to them announcing an anchor retailer?????

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We need Popeyes to make a return downtown .  Or a Houston version of Brother's from Nre Orleans. Brother's is a convenience store but they have a chicken counter with good cheap food.

 

They need to go easy on subway. 

There are a ton of fast food joints in tunnels but I know people who have worked for years downtown who don't know that there's a Wendys and Whataburger downtown.

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1 hour ago, j_cuevas713 said:

I think all of those are very likely if the city can push for it. Wth ever happened to them announcing an anchor retailer?????

That’s the issue.

 

my guess is that the city/Downtown management districts HAVE BEEN pushing for it.  My guess is that They HAVE BEEN pushing for it since BEFORE we spent millions of dollars on Dallas st —- the entire reason for its construction was NEW RETAIL.  But, Crickets.   Despite the retail-sector disruption, there ARE new retail store openings happening around the country continually.  NONE of them are in Downtown Houston.  Millions spent, zero return (so far).

 

If several new retail stores —- real ones which sell clothes, shoes, furniture, etc. —- don’t get announced within about 24 months, i think that the prospects of Houston ever becoming a “thriving” downtown will diminish.  A thriving downtown needs:

 

1) residents , (got it)

2) eateries/bars (got them in droves)

3) entertainment/arts (got it in droves)

4) real retail........ crickets.

 

A new pedestrian mall (on Dallas) lots of new Downtown residents and 100,000 white collar/office commuters in 1 square mile M-F and no new retail stores willing to open.  I think that says less about the retail sector and more about Houston’s ability to market itself.

 

If Dallas street doesn’t work, Maybe the Post Office site might be able to pull something off and get real retail and keep the retail dream alive.  

 

 

 

 

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I wouldn't put too much into the park in the southern part of downtown. I called and found out they were hoping to procure a half or quarter block for that park.

I was hoping they could put two blocks together at least. Discovery Green has been transformational in the development of the eastern part of downtown.

Along with the relocation of the sports venues.

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9 hours ago, CREguy13 said:

 

I understand the retail/thriving downtown isn't here yet, but it is coming.

I do hope you are correct and I am wrong.  But, frankly, we have all been hearing Houston talk about retail “coming” to Downtown for about a decade.  Millions of dollars have been spent to attract it.  Yet, during that time, more retail was lost than created DESPITE all the housing, hotels, and entertainment created.  

 

You mention new owners for Houston Center as one leg of a cure.  Perhaps you are correct, I again hope you are.   But were the old owners just stupid and not able to get retail?  Or is it something deeper?  Midway made a BIG SPLASH when they bought The Pavillions, what?, 5 years ago.  They built a hotel on previous retail space and planted some grass.  In the last 5 years have they attracted retail to the empty spots (like the old bookstore)?   No.  In fact, they lost retail with that high end women’s store closing.  Midway is a talented company.  They are not stupid.  So, if the retail is still not filled after five years, does it point to something deeper as the cause?

 

houston leaders have done an INREDIBLE job transforming Downtown into a place where people can live and where they and others have access to work, arts, dining, drinking, and entertainment.  An astonishing transformation in roughly a decade.  Yet, they have been unable to attract retail.  There is a point where the “it’s coming” hopefulness simply starts to ring hollow.  That time, for me, is fast approaching.  For me, others may absolutely and legitimately feel differently, Downtown either needs to get retail soon or simply stop talking about it.  Downtown is a great destination for entertainment, conventions, etc.  If retail is not here within about 24 months (again, my opinion only), after a decade, a mayoral study, and millions of dollars spent to attract it, then Houston should just “rebrand” Downtown as the FANTASIC entertainment zone that terrific leadership has envisioned and built.

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I think you nailed it on the head that the city needs to stop talking about it when they have little control outside of incentive programs.  The market will dictate and 'Retail follows footsteps' will always ring true.  Prior to this cycle retailers had little reason to look at downtown for any different use than daytime office workers.  

 

This project, Camden Conte, tellling  investors that they will break ground Q4 2017, rather than 2020, because of market dynamics is a good sign.  If Trammell Crow and Marquette also break ground this year, as they've stated, that will be a good sign.  Unfortunately, it is a waiting game, but the market for retail will be there.

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1 hour ago, CREguy13 said:

I think you nailed it on the head that the city needs to stop talking about it when they have little control outside of incentive programs.  The market will dictate and 'Retail follows footsteps' will always ring true.  Prior to this cycle retailers had little reason to look at downtown for any different use than daytime office workers.  

 

This project, Camden Conte, tellling  investors that they will break ground Q4 2017, rather than 2020, because of market dynamics is a good sign.  If Trammell Crow and Marquette also break ground this year, as they've stated, that will be a good sign.  Unfortunately, it is a waiting game, but the market for retail will be there.

I agree. The more residential we pump downtown, retail will follow. 

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14 hours ago, UtterlyUrban said:

That’s the issue.

 

my guess is that the city/Downtown management districts HAVE BEEN pushing for it.  My guess is that They HAVE BEEN pushing for it since BEFORE we spent millions of dollars on Dallas st —- the entire reason for its construction was NEW RETAIL.  But, Crickets.   Despite the retail-sector disruption, there ARE new retail store openings happening around the country continually.  NONE of them are in Downtown Houston.  Millions spent, zero return (so far).

 

If several new retail stores —- real ones which sell clothes, shoes, furniture, etc. —- don’t get announced within about 24 months, i think that the prospects of Houston ever becoming a “thriving” downtown will diminish.  A thriving downtown needs:

 

1) residents , (got it)

2) eateries/bars (got them in droves)

3) entertainment/arts (got it in droves)

4) real retail........ crickets.

 

A new pedestrian mall (on Dallas) lots of new Downtown residents and 100,000 white collar/office commuters in 1 square mile M-F and no new retail stores willing to open.  I think that says less about the retail sector and more about Houston’s ability to market itself.

 

If Dallas street doesn’t work, Maybe the Post Office site might be able to pull something off and get real retail and keep the retail dream alive.  

 

 

 

 

 

We don't have the residents. The only thing that will support what you want for retail is tens of thousands of more residents. Our downtown has fewer than 10k residents. Need to get to a minimum 30k+ to begin supporting the type of retail you are pushing for.

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1 hour ago, CREguy13 said:

I think you nailed it on the head that the city needs to stop talking about it when they have little control outside of incentive programs.  The market will dictate and 'Retail follows footsteps' will always ring true.  Prior to this cycle retailers had little reason to look at downtown for any different use than daytime office workers.  

 

This project, Camden Conte, tellling  investors that they will break ground Q4 2017, rather than 2020, because of market dynamics is a good sign.  If Trammell Crow and Marquette also break ground this year, as they've stated, that will be a good sign.  Unfortunately, it is a waiting game, but the market for retail will be there.

 

"retail follows rooftops"

 

until there is a critical mass of permanent residents downtown, retail will sit on the backburner. putting some sort of arbitrary "24 month" deadline on whether retail will ever make downtown or not is silly - retail will come when the density demands it. there's no magic fairy dust we or the city can sprinkle over downtown to change that. just give it time.

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5 hours ago, UtterlyUrban said:

You mention new owners for Houston Center as one leg of a cure.  Perhaps you are correct, I again hope you are.   But were the old owners just stupid and not able to get retail?  Or is it something deeper?  

 

The previous owners (JP Morgan Chase had it for awhile I think and someone else in the past ten years) were just interested in investing and then selling as the market improved. Brookfield on the other hand has expressed interest in making renovations and enhancing amenities to keep it competitive. Judging by what they've done in Allen Center, that means enhancing the street. It's no secret that millennials want an interesting streetscape and Brookfield is following that trend. But street retail in Houston Center won't happen until there are renovations, because right now there is no place to put them. You have pretty gardens in front of 1201 and 1301 McKinney that something can be done with, and The Shops at Houston Center (old Park Shops) is at 78% occupancy, which screams "Repositioning time!" It was last renovated in 2003 to be more open to the street when interest in urbanity was just beginning and I am expecting something big now. Get rid of the brick, glass it up, lose the skybridge, etc.

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9 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

The previous owners (JP Morgan Chase had it for awhile I think and someone else in the past ten years) were just interested in investing and then selling as the market improved. Brookfield on the other hand has expressed interest in making renovations and enhancing amenities to keep it competitive. Judging by what they've done in Allen Center, that means enhancing the street. It's no secret that millennials want an interesting streetscape and Brookfield is following that trend. But street retail in Houston Center won't happen until there are renovations, because right now there is no place to put them. You have pretty gardens in front of 1201 and 1301 McKinney that something can be done with, and The Shops at Houston Center (old Park Shops) is at 78% occupancy, which screams "Repositioning time!" It was last renovated in 2003 to be more open to the street when interest in urbanity was just beginning and I am expecting something big now. Get rid of the brick, glass it up, lose the skybridge, etc.

I don't understand why they don't just open up Houston Center with more floor to ceiling windows. Make that thing a glasshouse. It's not visually or aesthetically pleasing for retail. 

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I understand the concept of following rooftops in the new subdivisions and outlying areas, but when you have a daily live audience of 150,000 people working from 8-5 don't you think that those bodies would account for a few rooftops. Those people get out every day and walk the tunnels to eat and shop. You can't tell me that if there were popular options to shop at the worker bees wouldn't cut over to the shops after lunch to pick up something they need at home or work to avoid doing it after work. Those thousands of potential shoppers are in each one of those 40, 50, and 60 story rooftops. That has to count for something. They have cash and credit cards also.

On the other hand brick and mortar stores are fighting a losing battle with online shoppers right now so I'm sure retailers are taking a wait and see attitude about the future of shopping as it now stands.

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Just now, bobruss said:

I understand the concept of following rooftops in the new subdivisions and outlying areas, but when you have a daily live audience of 150,000 people working from 8-5 don't you think that those bodies would account for a few rooftops. Those people get out every day and walk the tunnels to eat and shop. You can't tell me that if there were popular options to shop at the worker bees wouldn't cut over to the shops after lunch to pick up something they need at home or work to avoid doing it after work. Those thousands of potential shoppers are in each one of those 40, 50, and 60 story rooftops. That has to count for something. They have cash and credit cards also.

On the other hand brick and mortar stores are fighting a losing battle with online shoppers right now so I'm sure retailers are taking a wait and see attitude about the future of shopping as it now stands.

 

Yes, lots of potential wallets downtown, but downtown office workers are still in a stay-in-the-tunnels, drive-home-at-5 mentality, so they're not helping yet. I do think that if downtown residents were the catalyst, you would see some of those people emerging from the office buildings and getting in on the action. We have seen this with Phoenicia and some of the restaurants. The traditional downtown office worker mentality is "the streets are nothing but homeless people, you don't go out on the streets," and you still meet some people stuck in the 90's with this mindset. But as downtown residents change the neighborhood and older office workers are replaced by younger, things will change and they will start coming out.

 

Another thing to keep in mind for retail is the example of downtown Austin, which is a complete success with a huge residential population, people on the streets, tourism, everyone wants to live there, etc., and there has been very limited entry from national retailers. You have some big local stores like Book People and Waterloo Music and of course the grocery stores, but there is no Target, no Neiman Marcus, a little bit of mall-type retail on 2nd Street, but not much. Thousands of food options though. It's just not a good time for retail. But grab a beer and some tacos and forget about it. A watched pot never boils.

 

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3 hours ago, swtsig said:

 

"retail follows rooftops"

 

until there is a critical mass of permanent residents downtown, retail will sit on the backburner. putting some sort of arbitrary "24 month" deadline on whether retail will ever make downtown or not is silly - retail will come when the density demands it. there's no magic fairy dust we or the city can sprinkle over downtown to change that. just give it time.

As an example look how long it took the east side of downtown to take off after they built GRB and Minute Maid. There were people bad mouthing the projects for not creating a  rush of development, which it finally did, but just not as fast as some wanted.

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I am not buying the “office workers stay only in the tunnels” arguement.  They don’t.  Go to any  non-tunnel connected restaraunt at lunch. Lots of people. Walk over to discovery green.  Lots of people.  Etc.

 

as for retail following rooftops, yes, I understand.  However, as I mentioned, there are 100,000 well paid office workers that come to Downtown M-F.  There are thousands more that fill hotel rooms/conventions and thousands more that come to downtown to “hangout, entertain, whatever”.  Downtown is about one mile x one mile.  All those people....... all those walets..... in one square mile..... No retail in a decade of trying........

 

 

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14 hours ago, UtterlyUrban said:

I am not buying the “office workers stay only in the tunnels” arguement.  They don’t.  Go to any  non-tunnel connected restaraunt at lunch. Lots of people. Walk over to discovery green.  Lots of people.  Etc.

 

as for retail following rooftops, yes, I understand.  However, as I mentioned, there are 100,000 well paid office workers that come to Downtown M-F.  There are thousands more that fill hotel rooms/conventions and thousands more that come to downtown to “hangout, entertain, whatever”.  Downtown is about one mile x one mile.  All those people....... all those walets..... in one square mile..... No retail in a decade of trying........

 

 

 

They don't "only" stay in tunnels, but that mentality is prevalent. Otherwise you would see 150,000 people on the downtown sidewalks on a given day, and Louisiana and Smith Streets would be the most active. A small fraction come onto the street.

 

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Our downtown workers, for the most part are a bunch of homogenized wimps. I don't understand they're mentality. 

They willing to risk their lives driving to work for 30- 45 minutes on our freeways, living in the highest rated crime areas - the suburbs, and yet they're either afraid to walk on the streets or maybe have to deal with the  weather. They're like gerbils or hamsters in their tube cities. Don't they know that sunshine and vitamin D are good things and a little fresh air never hurt anyone. I don't know of any other city in America that has this kind of a paranoia. 

I know there are a few brave souls that do get out but its not a very high percentage. I know that if there were more opportunities and things for people to do it might have  a

positive affect. The city needs to promote outdoor activities at lunch, maybe scavenger hunts pitting companies against one another and force the buggers outside.

Outdoor Concerts in Discovery Green or Allen center. This all comes back to the issue of more retail space on the surface that will draw people to them.

I bet an Apple store downtown would do great business.

 

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1 minute ago, bobruss said:

Our downtown workers, for the most part are a bunch of homogenized wimps. I don't understand they're mentality. 

They willing to risk their lives driving to work for 30- 45 minutes on our freeways, living in the highest rated crime areas - the suburbs, and yet they're either afraid to walk on the streets or maybe have to deal with the  weather. They're like gerbils or hamsters in their tube cities. Don't they know that sunshine and vitamin D are good things and a little fresh air never hurt anyone. I don't know of any other city in America that has this kind of a paranoia. 

I know there are a few brave souls that do get out but its not a very high percentage. I know that if there were more opportunities and things for people to do it might have  a

positive affect. The city needs to promote outdoor activities at lunch, maybe scavenger hunts pitting companies against one another and force the buggers outside.

Outdoor Concerts in Discovery Green or Allen center. This all comes back to the issue of more retail space on the surface that will draw people to them.

I bet an Apple store downtown would do great business.

 

 

There's an element of all that going on, sure, but most people don't care enough to be afraid. They're downtown because someone pays them to be there, and they are going to spend as little time there as they possibly can. If people chose a job downtown when they had a choice to be elsewhere, it's as likely that they did so for the park and ride as it was for anything else. They're not there because they want to be.  It's no secret that Houston isn't exactly leading the charge on extra exercise, but even putting that tendency aside, most folks are either going to zap a Lean Cuisine in the office microwave or go to whatever Alonti-esque place is in their building and leave 10 minutes earlier than they otherwise would had they strolled around more.  

 

People will choose to live downtown more as some price/commuting pain inflection point. That will get things changing, and it's moving that way.

 

 

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I love our tunnels. I don't think the lack of signage helps though.

 

It's bad enough that the restaurants are below ground but with no signs of you don't know they are there then...

 

I would not discourage new tunnel access but I would definitely discourage new retail in tunnels. 

 

The activity underground is crazy. I think if the downtown worker mole people activity was visible on the surface that would entice non mole people to hang around downtown more. 

 

The surface is overrun by vagrants. Not until the mole people dilute the visibility of the vagrants will the non mole people enter the maze. 

 

New Orleans for example had tons of homeless in their business district. But they are less noticeable because there are so many workers on the street.

 

And signs. We need signs. It's so freaking hard giving people directions to Whataburger. It shouldn't be so hard. You can hardly find a seat in that thing during lunch hour. They would make a killing with a street location in that big Whataburger building on 609 main

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Okay, it's almost 10:00 P. M. on Sunday night , I'm watching Chuck Berry video, and I'm waiting for my weekly fix of Hindesky's illustrated marathon of Houston's construction sites .

I don't know about you, but I'm addicted. See what you've done H.

 

 

    Or is it tomorrow?

 

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23 hours ago, bobruss said:

Okay, it's almost 10:00 P. M. on Sunday night , I'm watching Chuck Berry video, and I'm waiting for my weekly fix of Hindesky's illustrated marathon of Houston's construction sites .

I don't know about you, but I'm addicted. See what you've done H.

 

 

    Or is it tomorrow?

 

Sorry, but I had to work all weekend, making bank but I'd rather be on my bicycle checking out the construction sites and getting exercise.

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On 1/24/2018 at 7:43 PM, CREguy13 said:

I disagree, respectfully.  Everything is moving in the right direction and downtown's future is very promising.  Most of these new apartment projects have leased up quite well.  All of the new hotels being built.  The Astros and Rockets continue to have success, so the neighborhoods around them will continue to grow (I'm most excited with the potential around MMP).  The wider sidewalks and infrastructure are now there along Dallas and Main which is important.  Brookfield acquiring all of Houston Center is a good sign as they will activate the street level with retail/greenspace.  The new south downtown park will catalyze the remaining blocks around it.  

 

There is a lot going for downtown and I honestly believe we are just scratching the surface for demand to live downtown.  The great thing is a lot of the major Multifamily players got in on this first building cycle (TC, TC Residential, Hines, Finger, Camden, Marquette).  As they all achieve high occupancy and have actual market data to analyze, I think many will look at second sites and new players will enter.  

 

I understand the retail/thriving downtown isn't here yet, but it is coming.

As a follow up, from today's HBJ: https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2018/01/31/exclusive-new-owner-shares-first-details-on.html

 

A few highlights:

 

Brookfield's vision for Houston Center, the 4.2 million-square-foot office and retail complex it acquired in late 2017, is a revitalized mixed-use development with street-level retail, outdoor event spaces and white tablecloth restaurants.

 

Hernandez said that until renovation plans are finalized, the team's been executing short-term renewals for the property's retail tenants. He said most of the property's retail tenants are small; the largest retail tenant is Kelsey-Seybold, which occupies 23,000 square feet.

 

"You have people who are extremely loyal, and who have been here a long time," Wilson said. "There were several renewals done prior to the sale with people who, even without the renovation … understand something really good is coming."

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On ‎1‎/‎31‎/‎2018 at 9:02 AM, CREguy13 said:

As a follow up, from today's HBJ: https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2018/01/31/exclusive-new-owner-shares-first-details-on.html

 

A few highlights:

 

Brookfield's vision for Houston Center, the 4.2 million-square-foot office and retail complex it acquired in late 2017, is a revitalized mixed-use development with street-level retail, outdoor event spaces and white tablecloth restaurants.

 

Hernandez said that until renovation plans are finalized, the team's been executing short-term renewals for the property's retail tenants. He said most of the property's retail tenants are small; the largest retail tenant is Kelsey-Seybold, which occupies 23,000 square feet.

 

"You have people who are extremely loyal, and who have been here a long time," Wilson said. "There were several renewals done prior to the sale with people who, even without the renovation … understand something really good is coming."

 

Boom.

 

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On 1/31/2018 at 9:02 AM, CREguy13 said:

As a follow up, from today's HBJ: https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2018/01/31/exclusive-new-owner-shares-first-details-on.html

 

A few highlights:

 

Brookfield's vision for Houston Center, the 4.2 million-square-foot office and retail complex it acquired in late 2017, is a revitalized mixed-use development with street-level retail, outdoor event spaces and white tablecloth restaurants.

 

Hernandez said that until renovation plans are finalized, the team's been executing short-term renewals for the property's retail tenants. He said most of the property's retail tenants are small; the largest retail tenant is Kelsey-Seybold, which occupies 23,000 square feet.

 

"You have people who are extremely loyal, and who have been here a long time," Wilson said. "There were several renewals done prior to the sale with people who, even without the renovation … understand something really good is coming."

This is great and I hope that it works!  But, frankly this sounds exactly like midway’s pitch for greenstreet 4 years ago.... “outdoor concerts and event space”, “vibrant retail”, “dining”...... blah, blah, blah.  4 years later, is Greenstreet humming with hugely increased activity and lots of newly attracted  traditional retail?  No.

 

Two blocks away from greenstreet is the parkshops.  hopefully Brookfield can take this “mall” that is now essentially a food court and medical facility and turn it into a true retail experience.  20 years ago this mall had a brooks brothers, a quality jewelry store, a shoe store selling Johnson and Murphy, and a luggage store among many others.  How do I know this?  Simple: as a downtown worker/commuter, I purchased shirts, jewelry, dress shoes, and a briefcase during various lunches.  And, a personal friend of mine also owned a small boutique/high end candy store in the mall.  All gone now replaced by doctors and nachos.

 

 

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5 hours ago, UtterlyUrban said:

This is great and I hope that it works!  But, frankly this sounds exactly like midway’s pitch for greenstreet 4 years ago.... “outdoor concerts and event space”, “vibrant retail”, “dining”...... blah, blah, blah.  4 years later, is Greenstreet humming with hugely increased activity and lots of newly attracted  traditional retail?  No.

 

Two blocks away from greenstreet is the parkshops.  hopefully Brookfield can take this “mall” that is now essentially a food court and medical facility and turn it into a true retail experience.  20 years ago this mall had a brooks brothers, a quality jewelry store, a shoe store selling Johnson and Murphy, and a luggage store among many others.  How do I know this?  Simple: as a downtown worker/commuter, I purchased shirts, jewelry, dress shoes, and a briefcase during various lunches.  And, a personal friend of mine also owned a small boutique/high end candy store in the mall.  All gone now replaced by doctors and nachos.

 

 

This is at the base of major office towers while Greenstreet is separated from office towers by a row of parking garages. Greenstreet also has the homeless all around, this doesn't. It's really a big difference.

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On 2/1/2018 at 11:24 PM, H-Town Man said:

This is at the base of major office towers while Greenstreet is separated from office towers by a row of parking garages. Greenstreet also has the homeless all around, this doesn't. It's really a big difference.

There are homeless all around downtown including the park shops.  These include the certifiably insane  guy who sits in rags at the bus stop at Austin and McKinney 24 hours a day and packs of grifters who come and go.

 

The homless have not been a problem for any of the restaurants at greenstreet.  They are always crowded.  Nor have the homeless impacted the show goers at HOB.  And the folks who like to bowl, they see to go to the alley in droves.  But, 4 years millions spent on pedestrian improvements, lots  of fancy buzz words ...... and no new retail.

 

maybe Brookfield will figure it out.  I hope so.  But then again, 4 years ago, I thought that midway would have figured it out too given their amazing track record.

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On 12/28/2017 at 0:21 AM, Urbannizer said:

 

Fairfield Rsidential received an extension of for 1810 Main, but I dunno any new info regarding Marquette's proposal.

 

I am so hopeful this one happens.

 

I believe this will be the critical mass point for that area... any new info here is appreciated!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Tower crane  is going up this weekend.

Friday, February 23 (Midnight) – Monday, February 26 (5 am) 
Complete continuous closure of the 1400-1500 blocks of Austin St. (between Leeland and Clay) for placement of a crane.
Detour: Motorist will turn right onto Leeland, left on Jackson, Left on Polk and right back onto Austin.

 

Friday, February 23 (Midnight) – Monday, February 26 (5 am) 
Complete continuous closure of the 1400 block of Bell St. (between La Branch and Austin) for placement of a crane.

Edited by hindesky
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