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Parkside Residences: 43-Story Residential High-Rise For Block 98


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4 hours ago, mattyt36 said:

If of interest to anyone other than I, according to Central Houston, this will be the 10th largest residential building in downtown Houston by number of units are:

1. Market Square Tower 463
2. 500 Crawford 400
3. Houston House Apartments 394
4. Brava 373
5. Catalyst 361
6. One Park Place 346
7. SkyHouse Houston 336
8. SkyHouse Main 336
9. The Rice 312
10. Trammell Crow Co. | High Street Residential (Parkside Residences) 309

The Star is the next largest at 286.

Of the above, only 500 Crawford is not a high-rise.

Of other high rises, ARIS has 274 and Camden has 271.

Interestingly enough there are 2 single-family residences listed, 110 Milam (the distinctive building on the south side of the Bayou) and the National Cash Register Building (515 Caroline).  The WL Foley Building (214 Travis) has 2 units.

https://www.centralhouston.org/filer/0/1614996509/468/

Once the conversion of 1801 Smith to residential units (372) finishes, it will be the 5th largest residential building! Which would ultimately push this building out of the top 10. 

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11 hours ago, Amlaham said:

Once the conversion of 1801 Smith to residential units (372) finishes, it will be the 5th largest residential building! Which would ultimately push this building out of the top 10. 

Wait, they're converting that? When was that announced?

Edited by Big E
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We may be moving in a few months, so I've sent this link to my wife for her impressions. (She's 90% of the decision process.)  Between this and Brava opening, they'll'll hopefully keep the prices of apartments down a bit in 77002/010.  Especially since some of the so-called "luxury" apartments downtown are priced beyond their worth.

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On 7/5/2022 at 10:32 AM, toxtethogrady said:

Except for Central Park, NYC.

On a grand scale, yes. But Central Park is so large that once inside, the structures are not as "seen/felt". DG is a lot smaller and the buildings have a closer-in feel and are visible regardless of what area of the park you're in.

Quote

 

 

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On 6/28/2022 at 8:15 AM, Nate99 said:

I like it, with this and the new Skanska buildings, DG will be in a big bowl of large structures, which is a unique effect of urban parks. 
 

 

9C6BA811-0B75-4F1A-9567-FB8D4003DF88.jpeg

 

On 7/5/2022 at 10:32 AM, toxtethogrady said:

Except for Central Park, NYC.

 

1 hour ago, quietstorm said:

On a grand scale, yes. But Central Park is so large that once inside, the structures are not as "seen/felt". DG is a lot smaller and the buildings have a closer-in feel and are visible regardless of what area of the park you're in.

 

Lakeshore East Park in Chicago kinda has this feel 🤔

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13 hours ago, kennyc05 said:

Lakeshore East Park in Chicago kinda has this feel 🤔

Good to hear.  I'll have to check it out.  I lived in two buildings on Lakeshore East Park, The Shoreham, and Aqua. 

The success of LSE had an immense effect on local real estate developers.  It convinced them that having a park as an amenity would draw people in, and allow them to charge higher rents. 

POPS (privately owned public spaces) were viewed by last generation real estate developers as wasted space. Or as old fashioned people like to put it, "Not using the land for its [so-called] 'highest and best' use."  But that thinking proved to be so wrong that you'd be hard-pressed to find a major real estate development in Chicago and many other cities that doesn't include a park.

Magellan Development eventually turned Lakeshore East Park over to the Chicago Parks District, and now it's a full public park.

Here's a picture of Lakeshore East Park I took from Aqua:

IMG_0164%20(1).jpg

The running track at the bottom is part of the amenities deck on the top of the Aqua podium shared by the residents and the Radisson Blu Aqua Hotel.  The low-rise buildings on the right are a supermarket on top, and restaurants and retail on the bottom. 

Note how the taller buildings are fronted by townhouses so that the area can have both density, and a welcoming neighborhood feel.

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1 hour ago, editor said:

Good to hear.  I'll have to check it out.  I lived in two buildings on Lakeshore East Park, The Shoreham, and Aqua. 

The success of LSE had an immense effect on local real estate developers.  It convinced them that having a park as an amenity would draw people in, and allow them to charge higher rents. 

POPS (privately owned public spaces) were viewed by last generation real estate developers as wasted space. Or as old fashioned people like to put it, "Not using the land for its [so-called] 'highest and best' use."  But that thinking proved to be so wrong that you'd be hard-pressed to find a major real estate development in Chicago and many other cities that doesn't include a park.

Magellan Development eventually turned Lakeshore East Park over to the Chicago Parks District, and now it's a full public park.

Here's a picture of Lakeshore East Park I took from Aqua:

IMG_0164%20(1).jpg

The running track at the bottom is part of the amenities deck on the top of the Aqua podium shared by the residents and the Radisson Blu Aqua Hotel.  The low-rise buildings on the right are a supermarket on top, and restaurants and retail on the bottom. 

Note how the taller buildings are fronted by townhouses so that the area can have both density, and a welcoming neighborhood feel.

Eggy's is delicious 😏👌🏾

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1 hour ago, kennyc05 said:

Eggy's is delicious 😏👌🏾

I could only get in there once when I was there.  Otherwise, there was always a line out the door.

Here's a better idea of what Lakeshore East looks like:

Screen Shot 2022-07-07 at 10.08.11 AM.png

More to the point, it shows what it looks like when you ring a six-acre park with skyscrapers.

This view from Apple Maps is outdated, but I couldn't figure out how to do a 3D view with Google Maps.

That building in the middle that's under construction opened last year.  It's 101 stories tall.  It has two roadways running through it.  One at ground level, the other five stories up.  There are two skyscrapers and a mini-park on the right which have also been completed, those are 52 and 37 stories.  Another building has been approved next to them at 85 stories, but construction has not yet begin.

It's a good example of how to combine hotels, offices, apartments, condominiums, restaurants, retail, a school, and townhouses into a ~30 acre space. 

When I moved to Chicago in 2003, it was being used as a small golf course, which was just a placeholder until the 1965 development plan from the Illinois Central railroad could be built.  This used to be IC's rail yard and a wharf.  The land is still owned by Illinois Central.  There are great swaths of downtown Chicago that are owned by railroads, barge companies, and canal companies that no longer have railroads, barges, or canals, and exist today only as real estate developers.

Sorry to blather on about this.  I've written probably a hundred articles about LSE over the last 20 years, so it's something I know a bit too much about.

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3 hours ago, editor said:

I could only get in there once when I was there.  Otherwise, there was always a line out the door.

Here's a better idea of what Lakeshore East looks like:

Screen Shot 2022-07-07 at 10.08.11 AM.png

More to the point, it shows what it looks like when you ring a six-acre park with skyscrapers.

This view from Apple Maps is outdated, but I couldn't figure out how to do a 3D view with Google Maps.

That building in the middle that's under construction opened last year.  It's 101 stories tall.  It has two roadways running through it.  One at ground level, the other five stories up.  There are two skyscrapers and a mini-park on the right which have also been completed, those are 52 and 37 stories.  Another building has been approved next to them at 85 stories, but construction has not yet begin.

It's a good example of how to combine hotels, offices, apartments, condominiums, restaurants, retail, a school, and townhouses into a ~30 acre space. 

When I moved to Chicago in 2003, it was being used as a small golf course, which was just a placeholder until the 1965 development plan from the Illinois Central railroad could be built.  This used to be IC's rail yard and a wharf.  The land is still owned by Illinois Central.  There are great swaths of downtown Chicago that are owned by railroads, barge companies, and canal companies that no longer have railroads, barges, or canals, and exist today only as real estate developers.

Sorry to blather on about this.  I've written probably a hundred articles about LSE over the last 20 years, so it's something I know a bit too much about.

Pretty cool information!

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On 9/24/2022 at 10:01 AM, hindesky said:

zrdIdGB.png

"This view never gets old. Experience it for yourself..."

The view may never get old, but it has definitely gotten smaller... which is my only complaint about the location of the new building. 
 

Edited to add: Previous view. 👇

52510861215_af6c2e4e29_c.jpg

Edited by MidCenturyMoldy
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11 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

I mean it is what it is. I'd rather have that building there than the empty lot

Are you guys kidding? (I’m including emoji reactions to my post.) I guess I look out, not down.

Previous view 👇

52510927428_d2c0a22de9_c.jpg52509907967_b61ff6069e_c.jpg52510861215_af6c2e4e29_c.jpg
 

I would have stayed in that hotel for this view alone.👆Now there’s not much point.
 

Edited by MidCenturyMoldy
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21 minutes ago, MidCenturyMoldy said:

Are you guys kidding? (I’m including emoji reactions to my post.) I guess I look out, not down.

Previous view 👇

52510927428_d2c0a22de9_c.jpg52509907967_b61ff6069e_c.jpg52510861215_af6c2e4e29_c.jpg
 

I would have stayed in that hotel for this view alone.👆Now there’s not much point.
 

I mean, I could never afford to stay in that hotel either way, buy I prefer the view that doesn't have empty lots and parking garages.

 

Unless I'm in Switzerland or Glacier National Park or something, urban density will always be my favorite view.

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