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3300 Main by PM Realty Group: 30-story, 336-unit high-rise

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Can’t wait to see those cranes. Hopefully the height war gets even more hot after Caydon builds their 630-footer! 

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Those of you wishing for a skyline connection from downtown to the TMC may get your wish sooner than you imagine. This thing appears to be in a positive feedback cycle. I hope.

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1 hour ago, ChannelTwoNews said:

https://oeaaa.faa.gov/oeaaa/external/searchAction.jsp?action=displayOECase&oeCaseID=361318958&row=4

 

'351

 

I know it had been previously posted - but the 2016 era link didn't seem to work anymore. This one emerged today.

 

Also of note is the construction schedule shown: 05/01/2018  to  05/01/2020

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23 hours ago, urbanize713 said:

So this will be taller than Caydon by ~ 27 ft. Let the Midtown height wars begin!

 

Is Caydon going to pull out a spire at the last minute? :lol:

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5 hours ago, Triton said:

 

Is Caydon going to pull out a spire at the last minute? :lol:

If Caydon comes through with The District I and 2, this and the current Caydon project will both be dwarfed!

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That also matches the construction schedule shown above.  Can someone grab a picture this week?  This is awesome news.

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Perimeter barricades and fencing are up around 3/4 of the block.  Hopefully some excavating equipment pops up this week, too.

CC58241A-B505-4B28-AFE8-8465CF86F3EB.jpeg

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There was only one guy out there working the backhoe this morning.  Definitely not a full crew.  It makes me wonder what's actually going on here.

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Nice retrospect, Bob.  I was here and remember the huge amount of controversy was created by the notion of running the LR down Main St, as well as the excitement and vision returning Main Street to what it was, what it i,s and what it's becoming.  It has taken a long time to happen, for various reasons, but the proof is in the pudding.  It is no accident or random occurrences...it is the result of vision, hard work, and investment from many different people and organizations pulling in the same direction.   It is not a stretch to imagine that Downtown's rebirth, and amazing transformation that we are witnessing, is due in large part to the Main Street initiatives, that were set in motion, in the early 2000's.  Not to mention Midtown,  The Museum District, Hermann Park, Med Center and NRG Park and Astrodome.  It's quite a string a pearls and the Red Line is its thread. 

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And now we should continue the development of Main Street, and close it to cars! Convert the driving lines to bike lanes!

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11 hours ago, bobruss said:

 The rendering for this site focuses on the new Match,  Lake Flato's  mixed use cultural center, which has become a magnet for the Ensemble  station, along with it's namesake Ensemble Theater. I'm sure it welcomes some company after holding the turf alone for so many years. It's a pioneering theater with  a  tradition of excellence. Add to that the Continental club, and Mid Main,  a two block mixed use apartment development with a young clientele with an eye towards rail and alternative transportation. This has become probably the most popular station on the line for walkability and entertainment, and multiple retail outlets and services. Thursday night parties, Breakfast Club, Tacos A GoGo. It's  quite a mecca for young entertainers and patrons to interact. Looking North past the new 3300 Main, lies the HCC Elgin street headquarters. Just north of this is the super block with the new Midtown park and Camdens recently opened midrise. Across the street from the park, is the first major development to break ground on the east side of Main Street, Caydon is now working on it's fourth floor of this mixed use multi phase development situated on three contiguous blocks.

The rail runs straight through the heart of downtown with a number of new  major developments on Main Street. Starting just inside the soon to be torn down Pierce Elevated  is the Metro headquarters the two Sky House towers, the apartment mid rise that took forever.  In Upper Downtown you have Hilcorp, Marriot, Aloft, BG Place, and 609 Main.

 

In 2001, Mayor Lee Brown, initiated the Main Street coalition, and named Ed Wulfe, to lead a group of neighborhood groups and organizations like TMC,  South Main , and others to help create a new Main street.

There were all types of forums and if I remember correctly, there was a design charette  at  U. of H. Architecture school, that presented designs for Main streets potential. I believe the exhibit was held at the MFAH. They pushed hard to make changes, fight battles to make Main Street what it is today. The other person who did a lot of legwork in Europe and other places  researching rails and walkability, was councilman Peter Brown, who passed away this last year. 

These two men have left quite a legacy.

It's funny, because at the time, there  were quite a few very vocal neigh sayers  decrying  the rebirth of Main Street and rail. Its funny now, you hear nothing but crickets, from those old cynics. Meanwhile I hear the sound of the electric train running down the tracks.

 

 

I remember that Main Street Master Plan. It called for the tallest building in the world to be built somewhere near UH-Downtown, and for Midtown to essentially be a sea of mixed-use midrises with GFR along Main. Then we got ten years of strip centers in Midtown and fortress-like apartment wraps that looked urban from a distance but just had parking decks when you got close to them. I think Mid-Main is the first thing to be built along Main that is anything like what the plan envisioned. Did the plan help get people thinking in the right direction? Maybe so. It still took 15 years of kicking and screaming for us to be dragged into the 21st century.

 

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There will always be resistance to change. Sometimes a little resistance is a good thing. It tends to make for better solutions. Even though this has taken 18 years and maybe the outcome wasn't what you hoped for, it created an engine of change. I for one am happy just to see what has happened in a relatively short amount of time. Rome wasn't built in a day, and the challenges and struggles were difficult hurdles to overcome, but the good news is that they were persistent in making Main Street a positive out of what was a real ugly stretch of Houston.

I will also remind you of how long we have listened to plans for the Regency Square project, and how much of it has come to fruition. Not much.

The Main Street initiative is made up of hundreds of individual developers, that have helped create this patchwork quilt along Main so there was never a platted plan for renewal of the whole stretch of Main. If our city had zoning and maybe an architectural review board there might have been a more cohesive plan.

A relative ghost town,  just ten years ago, Midtown is now full of young energetic thinkers who will push the area to become more of what you wish for. 

Remember this project was presented in 2001, when most of Midtown was a vagrants playground unsafe for walking and truth be told a lot of failing businesses that were barely hanging on.

I didn't even go south in my description of advances on Main street. 

Look around the med center, NRG and the area between. I would consider the efforts of those who pushed pulled and threatened this rebirth into reality champions for what they were able to accomplish, and ignite.

There were several suggested design submissions in the exhibition. I remember the one you spoke of but I think it was just one of the many that the students delivered. 

 

1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

I remember that Main Street Master Plan. It called for the tallest building in the world to be built somewhere near UH-Downtown, and for Midtown to essentially be a sea of mixed-use midrises with GFR along Main. Then we got ten years of strip centers in Midtown and fortress-like apartment wraps that looked urban from a distance but just had parking decks when you got close to them. I think Mid-Main is the first thing to be built along Main that is anything like what the plan envisioned. Did the plan help get people thinking in the right direction? Maybe so. It still took 15 years of kicking and screaming for us to be dragged into the 21st century.

 

 

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54 minutes ago, bobruss said:

There will always be resistance to change. Sometimes a little resistance is a good thing. It tends to make for better solutions. Even though this has taken 18 years and maybe the outcome wasn't what you hoped for, it created an engine of change. I for one am happy just to see what has happened in a relatively short amount of time. Rome wasn't built in a day, and the challenges and struggles were difficult hurdles to overcome, but the good news is that they were persistent in making Main Street a positive out of what was a real ugly stretch of Houston.

I will also remind you of how long we have listened to plans for the Regency Square project, and how much of it has come to fruition. Not much.

The Main Street initiative is made up of hundreds of individual developers, that have helped create this patchwork quilt along Main so there was never a platted plan for renewal of the whole stretch of Main. If our city had zoning and maybe an architectural review board there might have been a more cohesive plan.

A relative ghost town,  just ten years ago, Midtown is now full of young energetic thinkers who will push the area to become more of what you wish for. 

Remember this project was presented in 2001, when most of Midtown was a vagrants playground unsafe for walking and truth be told a lot of failing businesses that were barely hanging on.

I didn't even go south in my description of advances on Main street. 

Look around the med center, NRG and the area between. I would consider the efforts of those who pushed pulled and threatened this rebirth into reality champions for what they were able to accomplish, and ignite.

There were several suggested design submissions in the exhibition. I remember the one you spoke of but I think it was just one of the many that the students delivered. 

 

 

 

I was not referring to a design submission but an overall master plan that was done professionally. I forget who sponsored it. It called for the tallest building in the world north of downtown, a "Cathedral Square" near the Catholic cathedral in south downtown with a diagonal boulevard running to the George R. Brown, Spur 527 to be turned into an at-grade, tree-lined boulevard, and more stuff that I forget.

 

Those that pushed for change in Midtown and who risked money in doing so should be applauded. Those who were a stick in the mud, who ruined great opportunities like a larger or better-sited Superblock park, or who stubbornly believed that "mixed-use doesn't work in Houston" when it was working in Austin and Dallas and even at Post Midtown Square should be, well, certainly not applauded.

 

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48 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

I was not referring to a design submission but an overall master plan that was done professionally. I forget who sponsored it. It called for the tallest building in the world north of downtown, a "Cathedral Square" near the Catholic cathedral in south downtown with a diagonal boulevard running to the George R. Brown, Spur 527 to be turned into an at-grade, tree-lined boulevard, and more stuff that I forget.

 

Those that pushed for change in Midtown and who risked money in doing so should be applauded. Those who were a stick in the mud, who ruined great opportunities like a larger or better-sited Superblock park, or who stubbornly believed that "mixed-use doesn't work in Houston" when it was working in Austin and Dallas and even at Post Midtown Square should be, well, certainly not applauded.

 

I'm sure your right about a master plan. I wasn't aware or missed that plan. I wasn't trying to make light of your thoughts. Just misunderstood your point. Those are all very good points, but thats not what happened and unfortunately you and I both agree that it could have been much better. I will always argue on the side of more GFR, an important segment of community building and walkability. It sounds like you've been here for years, so you should know how hard a fight getting anything done that makes a difference and makes sense here takes. And how often those initial plans get changed. Thats why I will take what we have been given in the last 18 years with a grain of salt. Nothing is here forever and it all gets reworked at some point.

Lets celebrate the positive,  that there are now thousands living where it was once a ghost town.

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Serious question: what lasting impact do you see the 8,000 or so residents living downtown currently having on the area over the next 5-10 years?

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A start. Look I know that 8,000 people is a drop in the bucket in comparison  to the growth in any segment of the suburbs.  

You have to take into consideration where we stood ten years ago and I'm sure someone can dig up numbers but it was a very small number of residents that called midtown and downtown home, and many of those were sleeping on benches and in flop house hotels at night. Now some of those old flop houses have been converted to luxury high rises and are filling up with professionals. I see signs of 3 distinct neighborhoods growing in downtown, and all of Midtown has seen incredible growth. I see it continuing to grow prosper and become much denser.

All I know is what I see. And thats a much improved downtown and Midtown environment, where you see many more people out on the streets, going to restaurants, bars, the theater, movies concerts, ball games and other events that weren't happening much down here in the past. I see no reason for this momentum to falter unless we have a catastrophic event. 

And you?

28 minutes ago, Vy65 said:

Serious question: what lasting impact do you see the 8,000 or so residents living downtown currently having on the area over the next 5-10 years?

 

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32 minutes ago, Vy65 said:

Serious question: what lasting impact do you see the 8,000 or so residents living downtown currently having on the area over the next 5-10 years?

The same impact as any pioneers provide.  A path and example. 

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I don't know, that's why I was asking. I welcome more and more people downtown because I'd love to work and live in a thriving urban environment. But, for all that people tout the progress of downtown, I really don't see much that would compare to a place like NYC, Chicago, Boston, etc... And I don't really see much cause for optimism on that front (but I'm happy to be wrong about that).

 

That's where my question was coming from - i.e., do people envision downtown's trajectory to be one that will provide a similar experience to the NYC's of the world (hell, even the Austin's of the world), or will it be something lesser/different/etc... I don't know the answer to those questions, hence my curiosity. 

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4 minutes ago, Naviguessor said:

The same impact as any pioneers provide.  A path and example. 

d43.jpg

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the impact will be momentum... in all areas.

 

RYDE just opened downtown and is amazing. This to me is a huge sign of progress. A well designed street fronting service for residents that is not a restaurant or bar!

 

People will continue to see an urban lifestyle and pursue it. Houston will have a urban living option that is legitimate. More stores that cater to residents will open. eventually we will see big things, but progress takes time. Hines new 45 story resi tower will be good. the theater district master plan will convert some of the blocks (bayou place) and the lots across 45 into resi. the parks will become more used. more people on the streets. more pedestrians.

 

I am looking forward to it!

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I hear all of that, but for some reason it's not all that satisfying. I guess I don't understand what the draw is to living downtown. Austin, I get - it's all the stuff there is to do downtown. Same for Chicago, NYC, etc... I get the appeal to living in downtown Seattle (proximity to work/an actual urban core). I just don't see what the overall appeal is to downtown Houston. To be clear, I'm not saying that there can't be one. But a bunch of somewhat dinky parks, sidewalks, and bike lines really doesn't do much for me.

 

Again, I could just not be seeing it - so maybe someone can help me out?

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3 minutes ago, Vy65 said:

I hear all of that, but for some reason it's not all that satisfying. I guess I don't understand what the draw is to living downtown. Austin, I get - it's all the stuff there is to do downtown. Same for Chicago, NYC, etc... I get the appeal to living in downtown Seattle (proximity to work/an actual urban core). I just don't see what the overall appeal is to downtown Houston. To be clear, I'm not saying that there can't be one. But a bunch of somewhat dinky parks, sidewalks, and bike lines really doesn't do much for me.

 

Again, I could just not be seeing it - so maybe someone can help me out?

 

Some people are visionary, others are not.

 

Hopefully you wont have to think so hard about it and it will just slap you in the face (figuratively). 

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Most basic reason to live in downtown, midtown, or eado is you are 30 minutes to pretty much every single Houston suburb when there's no traffic, as well as not having to choose between hobby or bush.  If you change jobs,  your commute's never going to be too terrible, and if you want to go to a large event (rodeo, football, baseball, basketball, etc) you don't have to worry about parking.

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Just now, cspwal said:

Most basic reason to live in downtown, midtown, or eado is you are 30 minutes to pretty much every single Houston suburb when there's no traffic, as well as not having to choose between hobby or bush.  If you change jobs,  your commute's never going to be too terrible, and if you want to go to a large event (rodeo, football, baseball, basketball, etc) you don't have to worry about parking.

 

This is kind of my point. There's nothing downtown that, as others have said, slaps you in the face. If commute time and parking is all a so-called "up and coming" neighborhood has going for it, there's gonna be trouble. 

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12 minutes ago, Vy65 said:

I don't know, that's why I was asking. I welcome more and more people downtown because I'd love to work and live in a thriving urban environment. But, for all that people tout the progress of downtown, I really don't see much that would compare to a place like NYC, Chicago, Boston, etc... And I don't really see much cause for optimism on that front (but I'm happy to be wrong about that).

 

That's where my question was coming from - i.e., do people envision downtown's trajectory to be one that will provide a similar experience to the NYC's of the world (hell, even the Austin's of the world), or will it be something lesser/different/etc... I don't know the answer to those questions, hence my curiosity. 

Except for Austin, a very youthful, attractive, and progressive city that is almost landlocked due to poor infrastructure planning during the 80's and 90's and were  forced to densify and in a hurry.  The other three cities were started in the 17th and 18th centuries. I believe Boston had 8,000 residents living in town in 1706.  I just read that in the biography of Benjamin Franklin. So yes, I think we have a chance for growth. As big as New York, I doubt it in your lifetime. I'm no expert. I don't practice architecture and some would say I don't know what I'm talking about. I just enjoy following Houstons growth, studied arch. for 4 years and am a concerned citizen for my 68 years. I base my thought on experience of living watching this town that had no freeways grow into a city of 6 million people with over three distinct centers of employment and many smaller areas of commerce.

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50 minutes ago, Vy65 said:

Serious question: what lasting impact do you see the 8,000 or so residents living downtown currently having on the area over the next 5-10 years?

Having worked Downtown the past three years, I've noticed a number of new restaurants opening up within the several block area near Main as well as the emergence of a hotel restaurant scene with the number of new hotels that have opened up, such as Xochi at the Marriott and Oxbow 7 at Le Meridien.  It appears as though the bar scene on Main St has become what Washington Avenue was 8 or so years ago--appealing to the younger/fresh-out-of-college crowd.  I was quite surprised by it one evening after leaving from a Astros game.  

 

I suspect Downtown appeals to newer, and generally younger professional, residents of Houston who are looking to be closer to their places of work and some of the city's amenities (e.g. Theater District, Minute Maid Park, etc.).  It's not a place I'd necessarily want to raise a family, but it's no longer desolate on weekends.  There are festivals to be had in the daytime at Discovery Green and plenty going on at Market Square Park.

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Just now, Naviguessor said:

What neighborhood in Houston has more then downtown? 

Off the top of my head, Montrose, the heights, the Woodlands master-planned suburbia (although it is my personal version of hell), and maybe even the galleria (although that could be a toss up).

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Just now, Naviguessor said:

What neighborhood in Houston has more then downtown? 

 

This is silly. Downtown has so much going for it. No need to fuel this fire anymore **Trolling**.

 

Stick on topic - 3300 Main. 

 

Downtown conversation can be had elsewhere... 

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1 minute ago, houstontexasjack said:

Having worked Downtown the past three years, I've noticed a number of new restaurants opening up within the several block area near Main as well as the emergence of a hotel restaurant scene with the number of new hotels that have opened up, such as Xochi at the Marriott and Oxbow 7 at Le Meridien.  It appears as though the bar scene on Main St has become what Washington Avenue was 8 or so years ago--appealing to the younger/fresh-out-of-college crowd.  I was quite surprised by it one evening after leaving from a Astros game.  

 

I suspect Downtown appeals to newer, and generally younger professional, residents of Houston who are looking to be closer to their places of work and some of the city's amenities (e.g. Theater District, Minute Maid Park, etc.).  It's not a place I'd necessarily want to raise a family, but it's no longer desolate on weekends.  There are festivals to be had in the daytime at Discovery Green and plenty going on at Market Square Park.

I've been working down here for two, and I really haven't noticed that much. Granted, I'm up in the theatre district where there is some stuff planned, but not a lot going on. 

 

I hear you on the restaurants/bars. They're better than nothing. But they're also fairly underwhelming, in my opinion. You might not be saying this, but I don't really see much urbanism (I think it's still pretty desolate) and, more importantly, development/progress towards something that will deliver an urban experience. Which is to be expected in a city that wrote the handbook on suburban sprawl.

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2 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

I was not referring to a design submission but an overall master plan that was done professionally. I forget who sponsored it. It called for the tallest building in the world north of downtown, a "Cathedral Square" near the Catholic cathedral in south downtown with a diagonal boulevard running to the George R. Brown, Spur 527 to be turned into an at-grade, tree-lined boulevard, and more stuff that I forget.

 

Those that pushed for change in Midtown and who risked money in doing so should be applauded. Those who were a stick in the mud, who ruined great opportunities like a larger or better-sited Superblock park, or who stubbornly believed that "mixed-use doesn't work in Houston" when it was working in Austin and Dallas and even at Post Midtown Square should be, well, certainly not applauded.

 

H-Town Man, Here is a link to the Coalitions website that lays out the entire Main Street proposal and plans. Its quite thorough.

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/tcsp/evaluation/hstntxdf.cfm

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4 hours ago, Vy65 said:

I hear all of that, but for some reason it's not all that satisfying. I guess I don't understand what the draw is to living downtown. Austin, I get - it's all the stuff there is to do downtown. Same for Chicago, NYC, etc... I get the appeal to living in downtown Seattle (proximity to work/an actual urban core). I just don't see what the overall appeal is to downtown Houston. To be clear, I'm not saying that there can't be one. But a bunch of somewhat dinky parks, sidewalks, and bike lines really doesn't do much for me.

 

Again, I could just not be seeing it - so maybe someone can help me out?

 

I think there's more to do in downtown Houston than in downtown Austin (full disclosure: I live in Austin). You have legit performing arts and major league sports, in addition to the restaurants, parks, and conventions. You can get on the train and go to the museums or Hermann Park. I guess it depends on taste. I like hearing a Respighi symphony more than another band trying to sound like Willie Nelson. And Houston's downtown manages more of a big city, New York feel, whereas downtown Austin seems to have more of a casual, recreational feel. 

 

Also, since this is an architecture forum, I would be remiss not to mention the architecture. You can either have internationally significant examples of nearly every movement in high rise architecture since the 1920's, or you can have a bunch of postmodern glass with balconies.

Edited by H-Town Man
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40 minutes ago, Vy65 said:

I've been working down here for two, and I really haven't noticed that much. Granted, I'm up in the theatre district where there is some stuff planned, but not a lot going on. 

 

I hear you on the restaurants/bars. They're better than nothing. But they're also fairly underwhelming, in my opinion. You might not be saying this, but I don't really see much urbanism (I think it's still pretty desolate) and, more importantly, development/progress towards something that will deliver an urban experience. Which is to be expected in a city that wrote the handbook on suburban sprawl.

True.  Houston isn’t downtown New York or Chicago.  But it has come a loooooong way in the past few years! It’s got the Convention District, Toyota Center, MMP, Theater District, Historic District, Buffalo Bayou Park.  The two things it’s still lacking are residents and retail.  But people are moving into downtown.  And as more folks see all that it has to offer, more will continue to move here.  The people will draw retail and the retail will draw more people.  And so on and so on.  Downtown will become an indisputable point of pride for the city and a true destination that visitors flock to.

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Sooo...(if I can finesse a segue) will residents of 3300 Main be going downtown, or spend more time in Midtown?

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With the rail they'll have the option to go anywhere on Main they please.

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17 minutes ago, dbigtex56 said:

Sooo...(if I can finesse a segue) will residents of 3300 Main be going downtown, or spend more time in Midtown?

Both.  I live in Midtown and I love spending time downtown.  I also spend time in the Museum District/Hermann Park.  I think that, once the Pierce Elevated is eliminated (fingers crossed!), the two districts will integrate.  They’re both pedestrian-oriented and easy to navigate.

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