Urbannizer

3300 Main by PM Realty Group: 30-story, 336-unit high-rise

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3 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

because this property is 108' above sea level.

 

 

Are you sure?... My house in the heights is at 50... you're saying Midtown is 50 feet higher than Heights?

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The official elevation of Houston is 80 feet. Katy is 141 feet and Conroe is 205 feet. So it gets high relatively quick from the coast. 

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15 minutes ago, Avossos said:

 

 

Are you sure?... My house in the heights is at 50... you're saying Midtown is 50 feet higher than Heights?

 

Not sure either. I just know that number comes from whatever survey was done for the project. Its the proper way to begin your heights for drawings when it comes to elevations. Its not exactly for every project, but its one standard.

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Exactly. My point was, the 438' height quoted previously was misleading. It's a 330' tall building, with its top 438' above sea level.

 

Edit: I'm not sure what the 108' figure is, because that sounds too high for this area. Regardless, I think we can expect this building to rise closer to the 330' figure we previously had.

Edited by jmosele

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1 hour ago, wxman said:

The official elevation of Houston is 80 feet. Katy is 141 feet and Conroe is 205 feet. So it gets high relatively quick from the coast. 

 

1 hour ago, cspwal said:

For what it's worth, this site says that block has an elevation of 46'

http://en-us.topographic-map.com/places/Houston-6818619/

 

 

Midtown at 40-50 feet seems right. No idea about the other areas...

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1 minute ago, Avossos said:

 

 

Midtown at 40-50 feet seems right. No idea about the other areas...

I've looked at elevation maps of Houston endlessly for years.  Indeed, there is great variation in elevation, from right at sea level off to the southeast and at the bottom of the east end of Buffalo Bayou, upwards to over 100 feet out near West Oaks and northward near IAH.  Downtown proper including Midtown, has elevations that range between 40 feet to near 60 feet.  Not a huge difference, but in an area considered so "flat" any elevation changes over an area are interesting to those that are looking around and paying attention to the lay of the land.  For instance, driving north on Kirby, then east out of River Oaks and onto Allen speedway - oops Parkway... one can really see the difference between the bottom of the Bayou near 10 or 20 feet elevation to near 55 to 60 feet in that part of River Oaks, with the beautiful undulating, albeit small, front yards and banks of the Bayou, even on the roads to some degree.  I'm no expert, but if you want to look around and look closer at our flat terrain, you can always spot a natural elevation variation in many areas just by looking closer.  Out in Brookshire, where I grew up, the elevation even rises to a whopping 165 feet - wow :) and as some one else pointed out, near 200 feet towards Conroe and The Woodlands.  A lot of rambling about elevation, I know, but I still find Houston's topography fascinating and ever so important to determining flood prone areas versus those that are reasonably safer from inundation.  And yes, ALL of the areas I mentioned here are still in the Houston area, though may not be considered in the "city limits". I'm not sure what city limits really means for us in Houston anyway.  WE have no limits !

 

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Not a lot of visible progress in the last 2 months, though they are working on it.  It's just starting to go vertical.  They have the first floor pillars (to support the second floor) poured, but that's it.  It's hard to get a photo from a moving train (with windows that aren't always especially transparent) of something that doesn't yet look very impressive, but I may try to take a photo one of these days.

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As promised, here's a photo.  Again, I'm sorry for it being stretched, but until the image posting bug is fixed in this forum (if any of the admins are still watching this site), I can't figure out how to post images that aren't stretched:

 

https://i.imgur.com/latr8mP.jpg

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On 8/31/2018 at 11:44 AM, ArtNsf said:

I've looked at elevation maps of Houston endlessly for years.  Indeed, there is great variation in elevation, from right at sea level off to the southeast and at the bottom of the east end of Buffalo Bayou, upwards to over 100 feet out near West Oaks and northward near IAH.  Downtown proper including Midtown, has elevations that range between 40 feet to near 60 feet.  Not a huge difference, but in an area considered so "flat" any elevation changes over an area are interesting to those that are looking around and paying attention to the lay of the land.  For instance, driving north on Kirby, then east out of River Oaks and onto Allen speedway - oops Parkway... one can really see the difference between the bottom of the Bayou near 10 or 20 feet elevation to near 55 to 60 feet in that part of River Oaks, with the beautiful undulating, albeit small, front yards and banks of the Bayou, even on the roads to some degree.  I'm no expert, but if you want to look around and look closer at our flat terrain, you can always spot a natural elevation variation in many areas just by looking closer.  Out in Brookshire, where I grew up, the elevation even rises to a whopping 165 feet - wow :) and as some one else pointed out, near 200 feet towards Conroe and The Woodlands.  A lot of rambling about elevation, I know, but I still find Houston's topography fascinating and ever so important to determining flood prone areas versus those that are reasonably safer from inundation.  And yes, ALL of the areas I mentioned here are still in the Houston area, though may not be considered in the "city limits". I'm not sure what city limits really means for us in Houston anyway.  WE have no limits !

 

 

Subsidence has historically been a big deal in Houston, with some areas losing 12 feet over the past 100 years.

 

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/For-years-the-Houston-area-has-been-losing-ground-7951625.php

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3300 Main next door is doing a remodel.  New developments really do spark interest elsewhere.

 

nHHNIXv.jpg

 

eJTxceF.jpg

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14 hours ago, Urbannizer said:

Larger rendering and highlights of info from the link:

 

High-rise with approximately 328 residential units and approximately 1,380 m² of retail space on the ground floor.

The project will take approximately two years to build.

It is planned that the project will be sold after it is completed and stabilized.

Leasing of the units is expected to start in Q4 2019.

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12 hours ago, thatguysly said:

It is crazy how fast Caydon went up in comparison this this one. Caydon really went after it.

Having 2 tower cranes probably helped.

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1 hour ago, hindesky said:

Having 2 tower cranes probably helped.

 

Probably helps that they are also looking at knocking out 2 more in record time....oh and the fact that its one foreign investor instead of probably a committee of investors like this one has. 1 entity moving things forward is always quicker than a committee moving things forward.

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