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Energy Corridor Master Plan (Central Park, New Urban Centers)


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  • 8 months later...

From today's Memorial section of the Chronicle. Seems like the bridge idea is far from dead... in fact, they want to build two of them:

 

http://www.chron.com/neighborhood/memorial/news/article/Corridor-to-develop-master-plan-5576265.php

 

Dizzying business and population growth has the Energy Corridor Management District re-imagining its vision for a pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use community as it prepares a master plan.

 

And part of that work may mean changes in the concept for a Livable Centers Bridge that would span Interstate 10, accommodating pedestrians, bicycles and transit vehicles and serving as a focal point for the district, which covers 1,500 acres along both sides of Interstate 10 from Kirkwood Road west to Barker Cypress.

 

(...)

 

Part of the Livable Centers study is the idea for the bridge, proposed as a facility that would span 24 lanes over the interstate and that could include an open plaza for staging special events.

To serve the growing population, a second bridge across I-10 may be needed, Martinson said.

 

"Or there might be a plaza built across or a connection underneath," he said.

 

"The bridge is the most iconic architectural feature (of the Livable Centers plan). We could create a real landmark here."

 

Several million feet of office space are proposed near the proposed bridge site. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is planning a West Campus along Park Row to the east of the Addicks Park and Ride.

PM Realty Group plans to develop 35 acres as a billion-dollar mixed-use town center just south of 1-10 on property previously owned by Exxon Mobil Corp adjacent to Terry Hershey Park.

 

Jeff Taebel, director of community and environmental planning for the Houston-Galveston Area Council, described a livable center as a safe and convenient place where people can have less reliance on cars.

 

"The Energy Corridor is one livable center that I'm most excited about," he said. "We think this is a model that's adaptable to a lot of settings."

 

Edited by lithiumaneurysm
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i think the idea of pedestrian bridges spanning that part of i-10 is neat, and if done right (hopefully not that odd design in the conceptual rendering), could look very nice. but ill reserve my judgement until we see close up/detailed renderings of the bridge(s).

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  • 4 weeks later...

The bridge looks ok to me. But I do love that whole Memorial City Memorial Hermann complex. And, the rendering looks similar in design. Around Eldridge... What is the larger road in the lower part of the pic. Beltway?

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That would be a pretty long bridge - not like those spanning downtown or medical center streets. Someone such as myself would certainly appreciate moving sidewalks. Then I could text while standing still. Texting and walking has not worked well for me in the past. :blink:

 

I would suppose TxDOT would have a lot to say about the whole venture. I wonder if small shops could be located along the bridge (one might need refreshments along the journey) like the Ponte Vecchio in Florence.

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Yeah I was wondering about shops along the bridge too. I seemed to recall some other old European bridge with a similar set up (didn't think the one I was thinking of was in Florence?).

 

I would think there are bound to be others. I can't think of any in particular off-hand. Other HAIFers can you help? The Ponte Vecchio is rather famous probably because it is in Florence which is another architect's candy store.

 

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I feel like theres a pedestrian bridge across a highway somewhere that has integrated retail (mcdonalds).

Cant remember where though...Indiana maybe? 

 

 I think what you are thinking of is the McDonalds at Vinita, Oklahoma.  It's not really retail integrated into a bridge, per se,  in that it's purpose is not to get either people or cars from one side to the other.  Kinda more like the other way around, I guess... a bridge integrated into a retail structure. 

 

The building hosting the McDonald's restaurant was originally built when the turnpike opened in 1957 as one of the Glass House restaurants, owned by the now-defunct Interstate Hosts company. Because of this heritage, it is also known as the "Glass House McDonald's" and the "McDonald's Glass House Restaurant". Later, the building also operated as a Howard Johnson's restaurant.

 

http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/11683

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_Rogers_Turnpike#Vinita_service_plaza

Edited by Houston19514
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 I think what you are thinking of is the McDonalds at Vinita, Oklahoma.  It's not really retail integrated into a bridge, per se,  in that it's purpose is not to get either people or cars from one side to the other.  Kinda more like the other way around, I guess... a bridge integrated into a retail structure. 

 

The building hosting the McDonald's restaurant was originally built when the turnpike opened in 1957 as one of the Glass House restaurants, owned by the now-defunct Interstate Hosts company. Because of this heritage, it is also known as the "Glass House McDonald's" and the "McDonald's Glass House Restaurant". Later, the building also operated as a Howard Johnson's restaurant.

 

http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/11683

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_Rogers_Turnpike#Vinita_service_plaza

 

That's not it. It might the one near Chicago; i'd have been more likely to drive under it.

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I would think there are bound to be others. I can't think of any in particular off-hand. Other HAIFers can you help? The Ponte Vecchio is rather famous probably because it is in Florence which is another architect's candy store.

Old London Bridge

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I still find this "area" nothing more than a real estate term. It is hardly a district. I guess it is good that the powers that be are trying to make it more of one?

But if it becomes a district, then all the people who came to the Energy Corridor to escape urban life will have to leapfrog out further. Brookshire? Sealy? Columbus?

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^Columbus is pretty cool.  If it added 5-10,000 new residents that city would really take off.  Same with Brenham.  Bay City might have potential as well.  All of those towns are just big enough that they're completely self sufficient, and adding a few thousand new people would make them more so with new services and retail required for the added masses.

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^Columbus is pretty cool.  If it added 5-10,000 new residents that city would really take off.  Same with Brenham.  Bay City might have potential as well.  All of those towns are just big enough that they're completely self sufficient, and adding a few thousand new people would make them more so with new services and retail required for the added masses.

 

I don't know about Columbus, but Brenham already has a lot of the basic retail already in place.  They built a starbucks there a few years ago, just off the inbound (towards Houston) lanes of 290 (which has just been nicely expanded through there).  Makes me think there are a lot of people there who commute to the outskirts of Houston for work.

 

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Brenham is still somewhat of a smallish town, Columbus is the same.  Both would do well adding 5,000 new residents, as the demanded services would be more than just a Starbucks.  Think new grocers, new schools, new office spaces, new hospitals... it would be a boon for both of those towns.  Add in their historic charm and locations along/near scenic areas and they would boom.

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I still find this "area" nothing more than a real estate term.  It is hardly a district.  I guess it is good that the powers that be are trying to make it more of one?

 

It's a district in the sense that there is a group (of developers, local businesses, oil companies?) that advocates for improvements to the area centering around Eldridge and I10, extending east and west a bit and south on Eldridge to near Westheimer.  They've been able to pull some things together, most notably improvents to sidewalks and connections to and from Terry Hershey park.  Plus they've gotten Metro to run a circulator up and down Eldridge.  They must be collecting money from somewhere as they have their own police patrols using off-duty HPD officers and have put up signage around the area.  It's very much like the Westchase district.

 

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Brenham is still somewhat of a smallish town, Columbus is the same.  Both would do well adding 5,000 new residents, as the demanded services would be more than just a Starbucks.  Think new grocers, new schools, new office spaces, new hospitals... it would be a boon for both of those towns.  Add in their historic charm and locations along/near scenic areas and they would boom.

 

I'm sure that's coming as companies move further out of the core.  I'd think Columbus might see it first with it being a straight shot down I10 to the energy corridor.  I don't know if there is an equivalent job center on 290 for Brenham-based workers yet so they may be making longer hauls further into town.

 

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It's a district in the sense that there is a group (of developers, local businesses, oil companies?) that advocates for improvements to the area centering around Eldridge and I10, extending east and west a bit and south on Eldridge to near Westheimer.  They've been able to pull some things together, most notably improvents to sidewalks and connections to and from Terry Hershey park.  Plus they've gotten Metro to run a circulator up and down Eldridge.  They must be collecting money from somewhere as they have their own police patrols using off-duty HPD officers and have put up signage around the area.  It's very much like the Westchase district.

 

Don't get me wrong I'm certainly glad the area is improving.  I just don't much care for the linear "Energy Corridor"

 

I'm sure that's coming as companies move further out of the core.  I'd think Columbus might see it first with it being a straight shot down I10 to the energy corridor.  I don't know if there is an equivalent job center on 290 for Brenham-based workers yet so they may be making longer hauls further into town.

 

Brenham is the larger town (I think).  If not, it feels larger.  It also has a college and is sort of a reasonable distance between Houston and College Station.  I like both towns and know that eventually they'll have their fair share of Houston commuters who drive in to Cypress/Cy-Fair or Westchase/Energy Corridor/Katy.  Its coming.

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Don't get me wrong I'm certainly glad the area is improving.  I just don't much care for the linear "Energy Corridor"

 

Brenham is the larger town (I think).  If not, it feels larger.  It also has a college and is sort of a reasonable distance between Houston and College Station.  I like both towns and know that eventually they'll have their fair share of Houston commuters who drive in to Cypress/Cy-Fair or Westchase/Energy Corridor/Katy.  Its coming.

 

In retrospect, I had forgotten about the new grand parkway connection between 290 and I10.  That puts commuters from Brenham in the energy corridor pretty easily.

 

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  • 3 months later...

Those are designs from college students in Texas A&M's Landscape architecture program, not anything based in reality.

Plus, it will never be like downtown, lack of road infrastructure is the reason.

 

It needs to be gridded and have one way streets for anything to happen.

 

It will just become a traffic nightmare.

 

At least uptown is trying to tackle by adding new streets and working on a local mass transit solution.

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Plus, it will never be like downtown, lack of road infrastructure is the reason.

 

It needs to be gridded and have one way streets for anything to happen.

 

It will just become a traffic nightmare.

 

At least uptown is trying to tackle by adding new streets and working on a local mass transit solution.

 

Was someone suggesting it should or even ought to be like downtown?

 

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  • 4 months later...

Sorry if this has already been covered, please merge if so. This article is a few weeks old but I think this is an excellent idea.

 

As much as I like a centralized Houston, it also needs other centralized areas close to the homes of people in those areas. It would be great to envision Houston like a ven diagram.

 

Give this congested side a place to go instead of having to come back into town.

 

http://houston.culturemap.com/news/city-life/03-17-15-central-park-in-west-houston-energy-corridor-master-plan-envisions-massive-world-class-green-space/

 

original newsletter source: http://www.energycorridor.org/newsletter/article/could-a-central-park-be-in-the-energy-corridors-future/february-2015

 

"The idea is to create a regional destination for recreation, arts and events, while creating enhanced riparian ecology, greater connectivity for pedestrians and bicyclists, better-performing stormwater drainage and grand, delightful parks that neighbors and employees in The Energy Corridor District can enjoy,"

 

 

 

Sounds like they could pull off a Buffalo Bayou feat as well:

 

 Long ago straightened, Langham Creek might return to its roots, when it once meandered and hosted seasonal wetlands attracting flocks of migratory birds.

 

 

 

The Energy Corridor District’s final, proposed master plan will be unveiled this spring.

 

 

Edited by lockmat
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  • 1 month later...

Potential Mixed-Use next to the Energy Corridor Transit Center.

 

http://www.sasaki.com/blog/view/580/

 

http://www.energycorridor.org/sites/ecd/media/docs/20150519_ECD_FinalPresentation-SMALL.pdf

 

energy-corridor-hero1.jpg

 

 

 

The largest of these target areas is Terry Hershey Park, where transformation and revitalization has generated local excitement and attention.

 

In fact, the park was recently dubbed Houston's "Central Park" in a Houston Chronicle article. Plans envision the park as a regional destination for recreation, arts, and events, while creating enhanced riparian ecology, greater connectivity for pedestrians and bicyclists, better-performing stormwater drainage, and a range of open spaces that neighbors and employees can enjoy. The park is expected to be framed by new development.

 

 

18399171116_2620422da1_b.jpg

 

18421409602_f55b0ae7a0_b.jpg

 

 

Langham Park

 

17802960484_2a393ff6be_b.jpg

 

17802942444_2d8ff542f9_b.jpg

 

18399188876_bba9d4b9a8_b.jpg

 

Grisby Square

 

17804961653_01885e2c31_b.jpg

 

18237772458_f8a79240b8_b.jpg

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From what I can tell so far, this looks AWESOME. Love the site plan. I wonder if the northern and southern parks connect underground?

 

If you are talking about the Langham Park renderings, the bike trail already passes under I-10.

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