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Post HTX: 401 Franklin Post Office Site Redevelopment

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3 hours ago, Luminare said:

This project was published on Archdaily this morning. This town still doesn't get that much onto Archdaily so its great that this project is up there. I consider this website to be "architectures front page" in the internet space. If its published here then it means people think it has great value that the mainstream should pay attention too. Link below:

 

https://www.archdaily.com/920159/oma-reveals-new-design-to-convert-historic-houston-post-office

 

Of course partly its here because OMA is involved, but thats also something to take notice. If its seen that OMA is putting effort into a big project in Houston then hopefully it pulls other big names to get involved in the city as well. I think with it being published in a very prolific high profile site we should take a step back for a moment and try to look at this project with fresh eyes. We seem to be missing in our discussions that this will be one of the largest green roofs / farms in this country and the world in fact. Thats something that we didn't think would happen here nor would others. This project highlights that Houston is ready to reengage with mainstream trends in architecture again. Lets take it easy with the crits a tad. This is going to be a really great project for this city.

 

Have we not been engaged with mainstream trends in architecture? I'm not disagreeing, just wondering. All the buildings of the past five years? The MFAH addition? Or are you thinking more in terms of pushing the envelope of these trends?

 

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I don't think they need to make it pedestrian only, just work on improving the sidewalks - you could remove one lane of traffic and widen the sidewalks enough to included benches and trees.  Something like that could make a real difference to the walk

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If they really want to have 4 entries from downtown, they're going to have to make the front of the site more inviting than a parking lot

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I wish they would build a few high rises on the parking lots around the building they are remodeling. That would make this project so much more interesting. A hotel and a couple of residential high rises. If Lovett/Intown Homes can't do it they should partner with a developer that can like Weingarten did with Hanover or La Colombe d'Or did with Hines or Midway.

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On 7/6/2019 at 7:04 PM, mattyt36 said:

Now those are some bizarre conceptual drawings. Or maybe they want to make Houston’s new icon the world’s largest rake ... 😂

 

I was lukewarm on the whole thing before rake. 

 

This one is in a very visible, but weird spot. It's not actually that far, but practically speaking, it's too much of a walk from the bulk of the offices to be something that the lunch crowd will frequent, so it needs to either be a destination, or origination point.  By the big freeway interchange isn't the best for residential, but I'd like to see that ideally, maybe reach back and spur development behind it to bridge into UH-D.

 

Or now that I think of it, why couldn't this have been part of UH-D to begin with? 

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I was thinking that part of this land could be student housing as well as standard residential. I feel that the retail market would do well and bring more of the campus towards it. 

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14 hours ago, Amlaham said:

I know I'm gonna get a lot of comments like "anything is better than nothing," but I really do wish this gets put on hold until something better comes along. This is literally one of the most visible part of Downtown Houston, especially coming from I-10/45/59. I respect everyone's opinion but wow....this "Redevelopment" is not it. The inside looks like an 80s mall and the outside looks.....the same. They threw on some grass and some bushes and called it a rooftop park, don't get me wrong I LOVE that idea, but they did NOT execute it AT ALL. Pictures for what it should have looked like. Also, I LOVE Houston sooo much, thats why I get so frustrated about this project, because we deserve better!    

image.png

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THIS! ^^^

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Posted (edited)

Now on the HAIF Development Map under the layer "Proposed". Proposed renovations are in pink. The future phases are also in "Proposed" as blue. For any updates on the status of this project. Please DM me.

Things to keep an eye on include (but not limited to):

-updated renders (will be adding pics to all projects later)
-project name changes

-changes in use or additions of uses

-changes in number of stories

-changes to Developer or additional Developers

-changes to Architect or additional Architects/Designers

-announcements or changes to construction dates / finish dates

 

If any of the above is missing in the project info already then please assist clarifying any missing info to me.

Edited by Luminare

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Didn't see this posted, it has a bit more information that the HChron article:

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/cynthialescalleet/2019/06/27/from-mail-to-mixed-use-in-downtown-houston/#7f92b5605da7

 

I didn't realize that because they utilized the tax credits or what not, they can't do the residential stuff: 

 

A residential component is not part of the mix, he said, because it is a landmark historic building and the project incorporates state and federal tax credits: “We were restricted from making large façade modifications which would have made it impossible to place residential units in the existing building.”

 

At Preservation Houston, an advocacy organization, Executive Director David Bush said this property and project have been on the organization’s radar. “It would have been very easy to lose the post office," he said in an email. "These buildings are an age when they’re typically threatened. There are a lot of them, they don’t look modern anymore and they aren’t what most people think of as historic.

“So we’ve got two challenges: Helping people understand that buildings from this era are architecturally and historically significant. And getting owners and investors to look at historic preservation as a viable alternative to Houston’s typical scrape and rebuild history of development.”

 

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1 hour ago, X.R. said:

Didn't see this posted, it has a bit more information that the HChron article:

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/cynthialescalleet/2019/06/27/from-mail-to-mixed-use-in-downtown-houston/#7f92b5605da7

 

I didn't realize that because they utilized the tax credits or what not, they can't do the residential stuff: 

 

A residential component is not part of the mix, he said, because it is a landmark historic building and the project incorporates state and federal tax credits: “We were restricted from making large façade modifications which would have made it impossible to place residential units in the existing building.”

 

At Preservation Houston, an advocacy organization, Executive Director David Bush said this property and project have been on the organization’s radar. “It would have been very easy to lose the post office," he said in an email. "These buildings are an age when they’re typically threatened. There are a lot of them, they don’t look modern anymore and they aren’t what most people think of as historic.

“So we’ve got two challenges: Helping people understand that buildings from this era are architecturally and historically significant. And getting owners and investors to look at historic preservation as a viable alternative to Houston’s typical scrape and rebuild history of development.”

 

From the very same article: “Instead, the company has plans to collaborate with other developers and explore the possibility of future residential complexes “in the medium term.””

 

I believe this statement conforms with earlier information in this thread about the developer utilizing the parking lot(s) at the site for the construction of additional structures after the initial redevelopment of the existing structure.

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Posted (edited)

It baffles me that this warehouse/distribution center is a historic landmark and protected from significant alteration while the Kirby Mansion in Midtown is unprotected and ripe for demolition if it’s new owner sees fit.  

Edited by MarathonMan
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Posted (edited)

m.e.h........another mall....

 

Houston Center ----> Sucks

Bayou Place ----------> Sucks

Houston Pavilions/GreenStreet -----> Sucks but getting better very slowly

Downtown Tunnels ------> Single worst development in Downtown Houston history.

 

Was really excited to see what was going to happen with this site but not anymore...The city should've gave the building to University of Houston-Downtown and just let the school

expand its footprint...but they decided the building is better off being an indoor mall straight from 1977.

 

This project should be called PreHTX...because its everything lame Houston developers are known for.

Edited by Elseed
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1 hour ago, Elseed said:

m.e.h........another mall....

 

Houston Center ----> Sucks

Bayou Place ----------> Sucks

Houston Pavilions/GreenStreet -----> Sucks but getting better very slowly

Downtown Tunnels ------> Single worst development in Downtown Houston history.

 

Was really excited to see what was going to happen with this site but not anymore...The city should've gave the building to University of Houston-Downtown and just let the school

expand its footprint...but they decided the building is better off being an indoor mall straight from 1977.

 

This project should be called PreHTX...because its everything lame Houston developers are known for.

 

It's a market, not a mall. I was at Dallas Farmer's Market last weekend. They've got one open-air building where fresh produce is still sold, essentially what the Houston Farmer's Market is, but the main attraction is a big climate-controlled building that has food vendors and shops. That's basically what this is, only this is way bigger and of solid construction. More solid than pretty much any modern industrial building.

 

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13 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

It's a market, not a mall. I was at Dallas Farmer's Market last weekend. They've got one open-air building where fresh produce is still sold, essentially what the Houston Farmer's Market is, but the main attraction is a big climate-controlled building that has food vendors and shops. That's basically what this is, only this is way bigger and of solid construction. More solid than pretty much any modern industrial building.

 

 

Market? Arent we already getting a brand new redeveloped yuppified Farmers Market with the Caninos Redevelopment? 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Elseed said:

 

Market? Arent we already getting a brand new redeveloped yuppified Farmers Market with the Caninos Redevelopment? 

 

I didn't say farmers market. Comparisons have been made on this thread to Reading Terminal in Philadelphia and Pike Place Market in Seattle. Not farmers markets and not malls either. There will likely be some overlap with the redeveloped farmers market on Airline since that one will not just be fresh produce anymore, but a city can have more than one, just like cities have multiple food halls and multiple farmers markets. This is like a cross between a farmers market and a food hall, with some tchotchkes vendors thrown in.

Edited by H-Town Man
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13 hours ago, X.R. said:

Didn't see this posted, it has a bit more information that the HChron article:

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/cynthialescalleet/2019/06/27/from-mail-to-mixed-use-in-downtown-houston/#7f92b5605da7

 

I didn't realize that because they utilized the tax credits or what not, they can't do the residential stuff: 

 

A residential component is not part of the mix, he said, because it is a landmark historic building and the project incorporates state and federal tax credits: “We were restricted from making large façade modifications which would have made it impossible to place residential units in the existing building.”

 

At Preservation Houston, an advocacy organization, Executive Director David Bush said this property and project have been on the organization’s radar. “It would have been very easy to lose the post office," he said in an email. "These buildings are an age when they’re typically threatened. There are a lot of them, they don’t look modern anymore and they aren’t what most people think of as historic.

“So we’ve got two challenges: Helping people understand that buildings from this era are architecturally and historically significant. And getting owners and investors to look at historic preservation as a viable alternative to Houston’s typical scrape and rebuild history of development.”

 

 

I'm all for historic preservation, but the old post office hardly strikes me as architecturally or historically significant.  

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21 minutes ago, Subdude said:

 

I'm all for historic preservation, but the old post office hardly strikes me as architecturally or historically significant.  

 

It does not have red brick, arched windows, keystones, wood timber beams, or detailed stonework. However, the giant concrete columns will be a sight to behold in our era of cheap disposable construction. I know, I know - concrete. Not the most poetic material. But think of the cistern on Buffalo Bayou. It has a certain "pillars of the earth" quality. The fact that this thing is strong enough to hold a rooftop garden with public gathering is pretty remarkable - no modern distribution center roof is built so strong. They didn't mess around when they built post office buildings. Even neighborhood post offices are a nightmare to tear down. There was a certain "we are the new Rome and we're going to build like Rome" mindset in the USPS in the 20th century. This may not have the Beaux Arts classicism of the Farley building in NYC but where it counts, in durability and utility, it evokes something of a classical spirit.

 

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4 hours ago, Subdude said:

 

I'm all for historic preservation, but the old post office hardly strikes me as architecturally or historically significant.  

 

3 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

It does not have red brick, arched windows, keystones, wood timber beams, or detailed stonework. However, the giant concrete columns will be a sight to behold in our era of cheap disposable construction. I know, I know - concrete. Not the most poetic material. But think of the cistern on Buffalo Bayou. It has a certain "pillars of the earth" quality. The fact that this thing is strong enough to hold a rooftop garden with public gathering is pretty remarkable - no modern distribution center roof is built so strong. They didn't mess around when they built post office buildings. Even neighborhood post offices are a nightmare to tear down. There was a certain "we are the new Rome and we're going to build like Rome" mindset in the USPS in the 20th century. This may not have the Beaux Arts classicism of the Farley building in NYC but where it counts, in durability and utility, it evokes something of a classical spirit.

 

 

There is still an older 1930's era post office at the site. Go back to my comments in May 2018 and you'll see the aerial shots of it. 

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12 minutes ago, Purdueenginerd said:

 

 

There is still an older 1930's era post office at the site. Go back to my comments in May 2018 and you'll see the aerial shots of it. 

 

I couldn't find your comments in May 2018. But I'm not sure how it affects the issue of whether the main 1960's building is preservation-worthy.

 

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Posted (edited)
On 8/1/2018 at 7:41 PM, Purdueenginerd said:

 

There is a portion of the building towards the front that was designed and constructed in the 1930's. If you look at the curved drive-in ramp of the structure, you'll see the original 1930's portion of the structure. Ive attached a screen shot of the site from 1944 to 2017. You'll see the original 1930's building in both images. 

 

 

1944 v 2017.png

 

 

Sorry @H-Town Man,  I was off by a few months. 

Edited by Purdueenginerd
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12 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

It does not have red brick, arched windows, keystones, wood timber beams, or detailed stonework. However, the giant concrete columns will be a sight to behold in our era of cheap disposable construction. I know, I know - concrete. Not the most poetic material. But think of the cistern on Buffalo Bayou. It has a certain "pillars of the earth" quality. The fact that this thing is strong enough to hold a rooftop garden with public gathering is pretty remarkable - no modern distribution center roof is built so strong. They didn't mess around when they built post office buildings. Even neighborhood post offices are a nightmare to tear down. There was a certain "we are the new Rome and we're going to build like Rome" mindset in the USPS in the 20th century. This may not have the Beaux Arts classicism of the Farley building in NYC but where it counts, in durability and utility, it evokes something of a classical spirit.

 

I think Tadeo Ado and probably Luis Barragan would like to have a word with you regarding concrete not being the most "poetic material" (not the only good examples too).

 

On 7/3/2019 at 2:10 PM, cspwal said:

I don't think they need to make it pedestrian only, just work on improving the sidewalks - you could remove one lane of traffic and widen the sidewalks enough to included benches and trees.  Something like that could make a real difference to the walk

 

On 7/3/2019 at 12:42 PM, H-Town Man said:

A thought occurs to me while Google Earthing this. They should petition the city to make the Congress Street bridge pedestrian-only. It seems like a redundant bridge. Turn it into a park/promenade with brick paving and trees and gardens, with stairs down to the bayou. Brick-pave the intersection with Franklin and then continue the promenade up to Post. They can offer to pay for it in an agreement similar to how Main Street Square was done. This will tie the development in with downtown and make it a lot more comfortable, even enjoyable for people to walk there and back.

 

 

While doing some digging in the Downtown subforum for things to put on the development map I ran into this. Seems like we completely forgot that Bagby street is suppose to get a make over, and this upgrade will revamp that bridge to make it more pedestrian friendly. Presentation in the link:
http://www.downtowntirz.com/downtownhouston/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/180507_Bagby-Street-Improvment-Plan-FINAL-Report-Web.pdf

I'm sure they took this into account at some point when deciding to pull the trigger on this. This soon to be beautified street is basically going to lead straight to this developments front door.

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1 hour ago, Luminare said:

I think Tadeo Ado and probably Luis Barragan would like to have a word with you regarding concrete not being the most "poetic material" (not the only good examples too).

 

I thought I was being pretty generous to concrete. If only a few architects have realized its possibilities as a poetic material, then it is probably not the most poetic material. Still a poetic material in certain hands.

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23 hours ago, Subdude said:

 

I'm all for historic preservation, but the old post office hardly strikes me as architecturally or historically significant.  

 

23 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

It does not have red brick, arched windows, keystones, wood timber beams, or detailed stonework. However, the giant concrete columns will be a sight to behold in our era of cheap disposable construction. I know, I know - concrete. Not the most poetic material. But think of the cistern on Buffalo Bayou. It has a certain "pillars of the earth" quality. The fact that this thing is strong enough to hold a rooftop garden with public gathering is pretty remarkable - no modern distribution center roof is built so strong. They didn't mess around when they built post office buildings. Even neighborhood post offices are a nightmare to tear down. There was a certain "we are the new Rome and we're going to build like Rome" mindset in the USPS in the 20th century. This may not have the Beaux Arts classicism of the Farley building in NYC but where it counts, in durability and utility, it evokes something of a classical spirit.

 

 

 

I think cities should preserve a certain (small) number of these kinds of buildings so we don't forget just how ugly they are, lest someone someday decide it's a good idea to build in this style again.

 

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While this building hasn’t been recladded, its exterior style is reminiscent of the architecturally beautiful buildings that were “modernized” with recladding of ugly sheet metal in the 50’s/60’s. Regardless of its supposed concrete structural integrity, I don’t think its facade is architecturally or historically significant. It’s mind boggling that the city sees some kind of historical significance in this plainly put, beige warehouse and not in the many historically beautiful buildings that have since been torn down and still are to this day. Very backward priorities. 

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Wasn't up to the city. This is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, so it's historic-ness was determined by the Texas Historical Commission (and the feds agreed.)

 

 

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3 hours ago, Texasota said:

Wasn't up to the city. This is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, so it's historic-ness was determined by the Texas Historical Commission (and the feds agreed.)

 

 

Is there some private entity that has to request that a building be deemed historically significant and, thus, protected?  Or, does the Texas Historical Commission move on its own?

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2 hours ago, Texasota said:

Wasn't up to the city. This is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, so it's historic-ness was determined by the Texas Historical Commission (and the feds agreed.)

 

 

 

Well no wonder. Thanks for the clarification. The feds probably only approved the listing since it was a historically government owned building.  Regardless what the commission/feds think on its “historic-ness”, I have to disagree on this one. Maybe I can see the listing for the administration building only, even as butt ugly as it is (really? facade modifications aren’t allowed?!), but not for the surrounding distribution warehouse portion. That’s purely ridiculous if so. Guess this means I am not as pro-preservation of “historic” buildings as I thought I was. Lol. Oh well. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, MarathonMan said:

Is there some private entity that has to request that a building be deemed historically significant and, thus, protected?  Or, does the Texas Historical Commission move on its own?

 

Basically that determination is made any time there's a federal "undertaking." That could include federal funds, but in this case it probably happened when the property was tranferred out of federal ownership. I *believe* that selling a property (in particular a post office) to a private entity also includes a covenant which requires the new owner to adhere to federal guidelines for the treatment of historic properties.

 

Most of the time, a National Register-listed property *doesn't* have a covenant, so restrictions would only come in to play if the owner was applying for grants or tax credits. If he used private funds he could do whatever.

 

Otherwise a private entity can always submit a nomination to THC, which could result in listing but typically not a covenant.

Edited by Texasota
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This is old news but the marketing brochure for Post (or Post Houston ) known previously as Post HTX is available for viewing on Lovett Commercial's website.

Before, the brochure was only available on the Post Houston website after filling out a form.


Brochure: https://lovettcommercial.com/Pdf.aspx?id=349 (archive link)



Updated listing page on Lovett Commercial for Post Houston, the adaptive reuse of the Barbara Jordan US post office building at 401 Franklin, downtown Houston.

https://lovettcommercial.com/properties/houston/post-houston (archive link)

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Posted (edited)

Last week, Lovett Commercial created a  Loopnet listing for Post (or Post Houston ), known previously as Post HTX. This is the adaptive reuse of the Barbara Jordan US post office building at 401 Franklin, downtown Houston.



Loopnet listing: https://www.loopnet.com/Listing/401-Franklin-St-Houston-TX/16820638/ (archive link)

Marketing brochure on Loopnet (same as the one listed in the post above): https://images1.loopnet.com/d2/GCPg2lbBwpqtF7Sjcx2gtZDPoUBZfz1C7PX0TjUiY1o/document.pdf?dl=1 (archive link)




From the Loopnet listing:


Property Type: Retail
Year Built / Renovated: 2020
Gross Leasable Area: 553,000 SF




Description

Lovett Commercial has broken ground on the redevelopment of the historic Barbara Jordan Post Office in the city’s downtown Theatre District. The 550,000+ square foot building, POST Houston, will be home to one of the world’s largest rooftop parks and farms, concert venue, boutique hotel, and many other retail and office concepts including restaurants, bars, international market hall, and flexible co-working space... Designed by the world-renowned architecture firm OMA in collaboration with Houston-based Powers Brown Architecture. The redevelopment aims to reinvigorate the city’s north downtown neighborhoods with a mixed-use environment combining arts, entertainment, creative workspaces, dining, and retail.



Highlights

  •  Prime location in Houston’s downtown Theatre District
  • Designed by the world-renowned architecture firm OMA
  • Expansive five-acre rooftop park and sustainable organic farm
  • Unimpeded Panoramic Skyline Views
  • Will house installations and exhibits by local and internationally acclaimed artists
  • International Market Hall

 

 

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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Posted (edited)
On 6/18/2019 at 4:06 PM, HOUCAJUN said:

Hopefully the hotel component stays or is this wishful thinking?


 

On 6/18/2019 at 6:57 PM, Urbannizer said:

 

What hotel component? I don't ever recall a hotel being planned here.


 

On 6/19/2019 at 4:03 PM, HOUCAJUN said:

In the HBJ article it stated when the property was first purchased on 2015 by Lovett, the developer mentioned plans of a hotel as one part of the development. Did i interpret this incorrectly?


 

On 6/19/2019 at 9:54 PM, Urbannizer said:

 

Ah, you're correct. I only read the excerpt by Crockpot. There was a few mumbles here about future phases including high-rise(s). 


 

On 6/21/2019 at 3:13 AM, CrockpotandGravel said:


Sorry. I didn't post that part because it was information shared previously in posts back. I posted the new information on next week's update.

 


https://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/28752-post-htx-401-franklin-post-office-site-redevelopment/?do=findComment&comment=594935

On 6/27/2019 at 5:20 AM, Urbannizer said:
Quote

From Houston Chronicle:

Former Barbara Jordan Post Office to be reborn as mixed-use project


...The administration building will eventually become a boutique hotel, and Lovett is in talks with an operator. 

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Former-Barbara-Jordan-Post-Office-to-be-reborn-as-14053500.php

 

 






More on the hotel component for Post ( or Post Houston ), previously known as Post HTX. This is the adaptive reuse of the Barbara Jordan US post office building at 401 Franklin, downtown Houston.


The Loopnet listing shows a boutique hotel will be part of Post:

46 minutes ago, CrockpotandGravel said:

The 550,000+ square foot building, POST Houston, will be home to one of the world’s largest rooftop parks and farms, concert venue, boutique hotel, and many other retail and office concepts including restaurants, bars, international market hall, and flexible co-working space...

 



 There is also this from the description on Loopnet (I omitted it from the above post to add here):

The Hotel component includes up to 94 keys with panoramic skyline views, located in the original 5 story Administration Tower. Swimming pool capable.



Also on the Loopnet listing is a site plan showing the location of the hotel and other portions for Post. This isn't in the marketing brochures. From the site plan, the  boutique hotel will be 52,000 sf.
 

oEDym70.jpg



 

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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Posted (edited)
On 6/27/2019 at 5:20 AM, Urbannizer said:
Quote

From Houston Chronicle:

Former Barbara Jordan Post Office to be reborn as mixed-use project


...The rooftop park and garden, to be known as the “Skylawn,” is being designed by Hoerr Schaudt, the Chicago-based landscape architects behind Houston’s McGovern Centennial Park. The property’s restaurant tenants will be encouraged to source ingredients from the garden.

“It will be like rooftop-to-tabletop. Restaurants will be able to order from the farm with literally zero carbon footprint, no transportation whatsoever,” the younger Liu said.
 
"...When people ask us why we saved the building, it’s because no one in their right mind would ever build a 5.5-acre rooftop that’s cast-in-place concrete,” Kirby Liu said. “This to us was an opportunity to create something like Central Park meets The High Line.”



https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Former-Barbara-Jordan-Post-Office-to-be-reborn-as-14053500.php

 

 

 

 

gallery_xlarge.jpg

https://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/28752-post-htx-401-franklin-post-office-site-redevelopment/?do=findComment&comment=594935







Here are more renderings of Skylawn , the rooftop and urban park component of Post ( or Post Houston ), previously known as Post HTX. Skylawn is part of the adaptive reuse of the Barbara Jordan US post office building at 401 Franklin, downtown Houston.

The renderings show more of the rooftop park and venue, and the landscaping.



This is from the website of landscape architect Hoerr Schaudt

https://www.hoerrschaudt.com/project/post-houston/
https://www.hoerrschaudt.com/project/post-houston/?parent=73 (archive link)


Lawn at Skylawn
V9xPrqu.jpg
(direct links to full size, non-compressed image: original link (archive link) | Imgur link )


Zoomed in of the art structure and/or stage
FA85LNx.jpg





Urban woods at Skylawn 
xmGQQbi.jpg
(direct links to full size, non-compressed image: original link (archive link) | Imgur link )

 

Edited by CrockpotandGravel
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Here is more about Skylawn , the rooftop component of Post ( or Post Houston ), previously known as Post HTX. Skylawn is part of the adaptive reuse of the Barbara Jordan US post office building at 401 Franklin, downtown Houston.

This is from the marketing brochure (most, if not all details were already reported):


Skylawn, the expansive five-acre rooftop park and sustainable organic farm designed by Hoerr Schaudt, provides 360 degree, unobstructed views of the city’s downtown skyline and will include multiple dining and event venues. The property’s culinary tenants will be able to source ingredients from the rooftop farm, allowing them to offer a rooftop-to-table experience.




Also last week, Lovett Commercial registered domains for Skylawn. The domains are listed below. The sites aren't live.
 

 

 


(Renderings of Skylawn are here and here)

 

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:

Also on the Loopnet listing is a site plan showing the location of the hotel and other portions for Post. This isn't in the marketing brochures. From the site plan, the  boutique hotel will be 52,000 sf.
 

oEDym70.jpg



 

 

I would have thought that a lot of the white area on Level I would have been retail. Do we know what it is, exactly? The areas devoted to retail don't seem that big, considering the grand market hall concept. Maybe they are just doing it in phases since that is a lot of retail space to fill all at once.

 

Edited by H-Town Man
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I think a lot of it is the market hall itself. This listing seems to be for more permanent separate spaces.

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1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

I would have thought that a lot of the white area on Level I would have been retail. Do we know what it is, exactly? The areas devoted to retail don't seem that big, considering the grand market hall concept. Maybe they are just doing it in phases since that is a lot of retail space to fill all at once.

 

 

Also the portion on the right/east on level 1+2 is the proposed concert venue, I believe. 

Is the basement usable space? 

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6 minutes ago, Texasota said:

I think a lot of it is the market hall itself. This listing seems to be for more permanent separate spaces.

 

Yes, I'm seeing that now. The white section next to the blue section on the left looks like it has a lot of kiosks and small vendor spaces, while the central section where you enter seems like it has maybe larger vendor spaces. You can also see the skylights outlined, which are really like wells going through all floors of the building. The office people will be able to look down and see the market hall below. I'm looking forward to this!

 

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We have gone from having relatively few public recreational areas to having so many on the drawing board that I shudder to think of the long-term implications regarding upkeep. (Not necessarily with this one, as it will be privately operated, but in the same vein I question their business model.)

 

With all that is conceptual on the drawing board for downtown and environs, I hate to say it but it seems like total overkill. Some concepts include cap parks from 45-10/59 interchange to the Spur, along with a “High Line” on the Pierce Elevated. And the downtown master plan includes the “Green Necklace” (or whatever it’s called) circling the inner core of downtown. And whatever East River is going to try to do. Certainly looks beautiful on paper but good Lord (1) how will such acreage be “populated”; and (2) who the hell is going to maintain it?

 

I guess, though, if I had to choose between this and how things were 20 years ago in re lack of imagination, I’d choose now. 

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While we have a number of parks, many of them are over-programmed as is and so adding more could spread that programming around.  Market Square Park basically only opens their lawn for events now which sucks if you want to just enjoy it as a neighboring resident.  With a few less events (and maybe smarter programming) they could leave it open more of the time.

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12 hours ago, mattyt36 said:

We have gone from having relatively few public recreational areas to having so many on the drawing board that I shudder to think of the long-term implications regarding upkeep. (Not necessarily with this one, as it will be privately operated, but in the same vein I question their business model.)

 

With all that is conceptual on the drawing board for downtown and environs, I hate to say it but it seems like total overkill. Some concepts include cap parks from 45-10/59 interchange to the Spur, along with a “High Line” on the Pierce Elevated. And the downtown master plan includes the “Green Necklace” (or whatever it’s called) circling the inner core of downtown. And whatever East River is going to try to do. Certainly looks beautiful on paper but good Lord (1) how will such acreage be “populated”; and (2) who the hell is going to maintain it?

 

I guess, though, if I had to choose between this and how things were 20 years ago in re lack of imagination, I’d choose now. 

 

I think this is only an issue if they are all developed too quickly, i.e. if the whole Pierce Elevated were torn down today and made into a park, you would definitely have some homeless inhabitation. But as a longterm vision I do think we need lots of green around downtown, esp. as Houston is perceived as such a "concrete" city. Chicago, Boston, and Austin are examples of cities where the parks really grace and enhance the center city. Houston needs it all the more due to the lack of a waterfront.

 

 

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There is plenty of room to build dense and any development that embraces green space is planning for the future and trying to set a better example. I want a couple of world class green spaces to add to downtown area. 

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On 8/14/2019 at 11:26 AM, H-Town Man said:

 

I think this is only an issue if they are all developed too quickly, i.e. if the whole Pierce Elevated were torn down today and made into a park, you would definitely have some homeless inhabitation. But as a longterm vision I do think we need lots of green around downtown, esp. as Houston is perceived as such a "concrete" city. Chicago, Boston, and Austin are examples of cities where the parks really grace and enhance the center city. Houston needs it all the more due to the lack of a waterfront.

 

 

May have a waterfront in about 10 years lol jk

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