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Development List for Buildings in Houston

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That sounds strangely familiar..?

It's been on the development map for a while(6+ months). Interesting how it says 5 stories on the description, but the rendering looks like 6 floors all the way around.

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So no hotel over the new GRB garage?

 

It's still on the map, just they have their layers ordered in a non-ideal manner so you can't click on it for details.  It's still listed in the "grid view", and there you can click on it.

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It's still on the map, just they have their layers ordered in a non-ideal manner so you can't click on it for details.  It's still listed in the "grid view", and there you can click on it.

 

yeah I found that rather annoying.... Just cut out the block where the red sits on the orange should fix that.

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Interesting how they no longer even bother listing the Chevron Tower, Five Allen Center, Six Houston Center, or the International Tower/One Market Square, and for the Capitol Tower they are only mentioning the parking garage.  I wonder if this was to indicate that they don't expect them to be built, or they just ran out of space on the sheet and pushed off the less-likely (in the near-term) buildings.

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...and for the Capitol Tower they are only mentioning the parking garage. 

 

Well, they changed the color of Capitol Tower from "office orange" to "everything else yellow".

 

I would bet that Skanska is keeping their powder dry on that one and waiting for another upswing.

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Everything is getting pushed back. At least some developers still have confidence in downtown, like Marquette.

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Not exactly a bad thing. A mini cool off would do the market some good after it was so red hot for so long. I also think this would be a good for when the city starts putting out more details about their General Plan. Hopefully when the next cycle kicks in it's in line with that new General Plan.

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I was hoping that the rumor that the space next to hearsay in market square was a subway was just that..sadly They have already started slapping subway signs on it....who walks around that area and says " you know the subway franchise in DT are under served, I know there is a subway literally right down the block, not even a full block" waste of space that could have been one more bar in DT houston growing bar scene

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Final numbers on 2014 showed Houston with 2.994 million jobs in December - an upward revision of about 50,000 that was not nearly as spectacular as the upward revision for Dallas. Houston ended up gaining 107,000 jobs on the year. January showed a drop to 2.946 million, but that's probably seasonal.

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for those freaking out about Capital Tower being missing from the last development map.. the most recent updated map came out the other day and has Capital Tower, Chevron Tower, and 6 Houston Center back on the map under planned.

http://www.downtownhouston.org/site_media/uploads/attachments/

 

 

Perhaps they should be left off since we have no start dates?

Edited by LTAWACS

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If we did that, we might have to leave off things like Camden's project. That one's been on-again, off-again for a while...

Looks like occupancy for most apartments in the mid/downtown area are at 98% or higher, I'm frankly surprised that more destination residentials like this hasn't flown up.

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Looks like Houston is making front page cause of oil:

 

http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21646221-americas-fastest-growing-metropolis-faces-up-cheaper-oil-life-sprawl

 

 

 

20150314_USP004_0.jpg

FOR a view of Houston’s economy, get in a car. At the intersection of the Loop and Freeway 225, two motorways in the south-east of the city, you drive over a high, tangled overpass. To the east, where the port of Houston sits on Buffalo Bayou, the skyline is an endless mass of refineries, warehouses and factories: Houston is an oil town. To the west, glistening skyscrapers and cranes puncture greenery. In between, the landscape is a sprawl of signs advertising motels and car dealerships.

Houston is not pretty, but it thrives. In the decade to 2010, the population of its metro area grew more than that of any other American city. Between 2009 and 2013 its real GDP increased by 22%, more than twice as fast as the American economy as a whole. Its growth infuriates new urbanists who insist that dense, walkable places such as Manhattan or San Francisco are the future. The question is, can Houston continue to thrive in an oil bust?

 

Edited by Triton
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Latest census numbers are in; as of July 1, 2014, Greater Houston had 6.5 million people. Even with the oil shock, the city could be at 7 million by 2020.

500,000 more people on these roads. I'm taking a helicopter into work.

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Houston did add about 150,000 more people in the last couple years so it is definitely on pace to do so.

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FIFY

 

Latest census numbers are in; as of July 1, 2014, Greater Houston had 6.5 million people. Even with the oil shock, the city could be at will almost certainly be above 7 million by 2020, and probably before.

 

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We absolutely need to look at more alternatives to highways. They are maxed out. There comes a point where congestion brings a city to a complete halt. We expanded the Katy Freeway not that long ago and look how much of a mess it is already.

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I'm taking a helicopter into work.

 

Do you remember the '70s when those things were more numerous than mosquitoes? Every patch of vacant green grass became a helipad. :blink:

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Incidentally, the city of San Francisco is seeing its own examples of shortages these days. I'm not talking about water; it seems the last West Coast dockworkers' strike has dried up the supply of window glass, although what that reveals is too much reliance on China for building materials. <_<

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Latest census numbers are in; as of July 1, 2014, Greater Houston had 6.5 million people. Even with the oil shock, the city could be at 7 million by 2020.

Yeah in the 4 years since the census Houston increased by 500k. by July this year houston should be about 6.625M. So that would leave about 375,000 away from 7 million with 5 years to go.

I think Houston should hit 7 by late 2018, early 2019 in a slower scenario and early 2018 in a moderate scenario. If Houston was to maintain the 2013 to 2014 rate then it would be nearing 7 million by superbowl and passing it a few months after

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Dallas/Ft.Worth will hit 7 Million this year, with the oil slowdown I doubt Houston can do much catch up on the DFW 450-500K population lead they always hold on us any time soon or ever for that matter, but hey it is two cities.

 

Wow way to bait this thread hard. How about we don't go into a Houston vs. Dallas debate, ok? *sighs*

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Ever since I was a kid I always wanted Houston to be bigger than DFW, can't help it.

 

Same, but your previous statement was like tossing a bottle of lighter fluid into a fire lol Just saying

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Fort Worth is growing faster then Dallas.  The Census will spilt them eventually Dallas-Plano MSA and Forth Worth-Arlington MSA.  I have friends that come to Houston to visit and cannot believe how huge it is.  Harris County is now at 4.4 million.

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Dallas even with fort Worth was smaller than us up until the late 80s. Back then they were a cmsa. Kind of like a combined statistical area. the Houston pmsa was bigger than the fort Worth pmsa plus the Dallas pmsa. Houston retook the lead again in the 90s then lost it a couple years after. In 2003 the census redefined metro areas and combined the two areas into one msa. By then the combined area was already larger than the houston area.

Anyway, I don't think Houston will be bigger than north Texas any time soon, but I don't care if we are bigger. I like the direction houston is heading and it's good enough for me.

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Ever since I was a kid I always wanted Houston to be bigger than DFW, can't help it.

 

In 1980, Houston was bigger than Dallas and Fort Worth combined. The bust changed all that.

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Fort Worth is growing faster then Dallas.  The Census will spilt them eventually Dallas-Plano MSA and Forth Worth-Arlington MSA.  I have friends that come to Houston to visit and cannot believe how huge it is.  Harris County is now at 4.4 million.

That actually has happened. If you look at the census numbers, Dallas is one PMSA and Fort Worth is another.

 

The same theory suggests Brazoria and Galveston will become separate PMSAs within the Houston MSA.

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This thread is too good to be spending too much time on things like this, but I would just like to say that msas are defined by commuting patterns. The current threshold is 25% in either and or both directions. Dallas and tarrant counties are getting more and more intertwined in terms of commuting so I don't see them being split. Same thing with Harris County and Brazoria and Galveston counties. Brazoria is seem less ly connected to Harris now and has a high percentage of commuters who live on Brazoria county but travel to work at TMC.

What I do see is Houston picking up a few counties such as Matagorda(40K), washington (30k), the CSB metro(200k), getting back the San Jacinto county (30k) walker (70k) Wharton (40k). Matagorda, washington, Wharton and walker are in Houston's combined area but not in the metro area. SAN Jac was in our metro but got dropped off, I think it has a good chance to be readded. These counties add just over 400 to the area and would bring Houston to 6.9M. If Houston continues to push north and west I really do see it combining with the CSB metro

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There are at least two other towers going up on 57th Street that will be taller.

 

The next set of 9-11 terrorists won't know which building to fly the planes into... :P

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BG Group will be bought by Shell........ So our BG Group Place will be no longer...

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I would wait and see.  BG Group is strong where Shell is weak.  The synergies combined will make Shell stronger.  They have been lagging behind ExxonMobil and Chevron.  Shell is doing this now before oil goes back up next year.  They will be in a very good position.   

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