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Development List for Buildings in Houston - March, 2014

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According to GaWC Houston in 2018 is ranked an Alpha minus world city, slightly above Dallas, Atlanta, Boston (Beta plus) but at par with DC, Prague, and Rome. Does anyone know what this exactly means?

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17 hours ago, Twinsanity02 said:

According to GaWC Houston in 2018 is ranked an Alpha minus world city, slightly above Dallas, Atlanta, Boston (Beta plus) but at par with DC, Prague, and Rome. Does anyone know what this exactly means?

alpha++ cities In all analyses, London and New York stand out as clearly more integrated than all other cities and constitute their own high level of integration

alpha+ cities Other highly integrated cities that complement London and New York , largely filling in advanced service needs for the Pacific Asia

alpha alpha- cities Very important world cities that link major economic regions and states into the world economy

All beta level cities These are important world cities that are instrumental in linking their region or state into the world economy

All gamma level cities These can be world cities linking smaller regions or states into the world economy, or important world cities whose major global capacity is not in advanced producer services

Cities with sufficiency of services These are cities that are not world cities as defined here but they have sufficient services so as not to be overtly dependent on world cities. Two specialised categories of city are common at this level of integration: smaller capital cities, and traditional centres of manufacturing regions

 

-https://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/gawcworlds.html

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The Bureau of Labor  Statistics reports the Houston MSA added 111,100 new jobs in 2018. Don't know the correlation with this and population growth, but it suggests that the population growth is zooming upward rapidly.

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14 minutes ago, Twinsanity02 said:

The Bureau of Labor  Statistics reports the Houston MSA added 111,100 new jobs in 2018. Don't know the correlation with this and population growth, but it suggests that the population growth is zooming upward rapidly.

 

For a city that has a very high employment rate and a very low unemployment rate, thats pretty impressive. Even if it doesn't correlate 1:1, the fact that nearly everyone is employed means that if companies want to staff their jobs then they will advertise outside the city which will bring new people here knowing that the employment rate is high meaning the odds of getting a job of whatever kind will be high.

Edited by Luminare
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On 2/26/2019 at 9:41 PM, Luminare said:

 

For a city that has a very high employment rate and a very low unemployment rate, thats pretty impressive. Even if it doesn't correlate 1:1, the fact that nearly everyone is employed means that if companies want to staff their jobs then they will advertise outside the city which will bring new people here knowing that the employment rate is high meaning the odds of getting a job of whatever kind will be high.

 

Houston’s unemployment rate is 4.1%, essentially the same as the U.S. as a whole at 4.0%.  Would not say that’s “very low.” DFW added slightly more with 3.5%.

 

Still the recovery from the mini-recession (and the fact that it was mini to begin with) is better than I would have ever guessed.

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On 1/31/2019 at 7:01 AM, Luminare said:

1 - TMC Research Campus 

2 - Sears building conversion to Houston's Innovation District

3 - MFAH expansion project

4 - Cayden's 3 towers for midtown

5 - Block 58 - Hines 47 story office building on old Houston Chronicle site + Block 42 - Hines 46 story residential tower

6 - Hanover mixed use at 3540 W. Dallas + The Allen mixed use at Allen Pkwy & Gillette (Allen Pkwy Major Developments)

7 - McNair mixed use at Post Oak & Richmond (former design by Munoz + Albin)

8 - KBR / East River Site

9 - Upper Kirby / Greenway Major Developments: The RO, Hanover Post Oak, etc...

10 - Major Infrastructure Overhauls: 59/45 Reconstruction + Downtown Greenbelt + Bayou Canal, The Blvd Project, Lower Westheimer Project, METRO Next (even though it leaves a lot to be desired. Its still something), HSR Station at Mall Site.

 

Updated list:

 

1 - KBR / East River Site

2 - TMC Research Campus 

3 - Sears building conversion to Houston's Innovation District

4 - MFAH expansion project

5 - Cayden's 3 towers for midtown

6 - Block 58 - Hines 47 story office building on old Houston Chronicle site + Block 42 - Hines 46 story residential tower

7 - Hanover mixed use at 3540 W. Dallas + The Allen mixed use at Allen Pkwy & Gillette (Allen Pkwy Major Developments)

8 - McNair mixed use at Post Oak & Richmond (former design by Munoz + Albin)

9 - Upper Kirby / Greenway Major Developments: The RO, Hanover Post Oak, etc...

10 - Major Infrastructure Overhauls: 59/45 Reconstruction + Downtown Greenbelt + Bayou Canal, The Blvd Project, Lower Westheimer Project, METRO Next (even though it leaves a lot to be desired. Its still something), HSR Station at Mall Site.

 

I've officially moved KBR / East River Site from #8 to #1. I think we can all agree, right?

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17 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

Updated list:

 

1 - KBR / East River Site

2 - TMC Research Campus 

3 - Sears building conversion to Houston's Innovation District

4 - MFAH expansion project

5 - Cayden's 3 towers for midtown

6 - Block 58 - Hines 47 story office building on old Houston Chronicle site + Block 42 - Hines 46 story residential tower

7 - Hanover mixed use at 3540 W. Dallas + The Allen mixed use at Allen Pkwy & Gillette (Allen Pkwy Major Developments)

8 - McNair mixed use at Post Oak & Richmond (former design by Munoz + Albin)

9 - Upper Kirby / Greenway Major Developments: The RO, Hanover Post Oak, etc...

10 - Major Infrastructure Overhauls: 59/45 Reconstruction + Downtown Greenbelt + Bayou Canal, The Blvd Project, Lower Westheimer Project, METRO Next (even though it leaves a lot to be desired. Its still something), HSR Station at Mall Site.

 

I've officially moved KBR / East River Site from #8 to #1. I think we can all agree, right?

 

 Looking back, I think the 2010s will be seen as one of the most transformative decades in Houston's history. There's just been so many major projects and many more to come.

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10 hours ago, Luminare said:

 

Updated list:

 

1 - KBR / East River Site

2 - TMC Research Campus 

3 - Sears building conversion to Houston's Innovation District

4 - MFAH expansion project

5 - Cayden's 3 towers for midtown

6 - Block 58 - Hines 47 story office building on old Houston Chronicle site + Block 42 - Hines 46 story residential tower

7 - Hanover mixed use at 3540 W. Dallas + The Allen mixed use at Allen Pkwy & Gillette (Allen Pkwy Major Developments)

8 - McNair mixed use at Post Oak & Richmond (former design by Munoz + Albin)

9 - Upper Kirby / Greenway Major Developments: The RO, Hanover Post Oak, etc...

10 - Major Infrastructure Overhauls: 59/45 Reconstruction + Downtown Greenbelt + Bayou Canal, The Blvd Project, Lower Westheimer Project, METRO Next (even though it leaves a lot to be desired. Its still something), HSR Station at Mall Site.

 

I've officially moved KBR / East River Site from #8 to #1. I think we can all agree, right?

The growth in Houston is indeed amazing. Midtown used to be a wasteland. Drove my daughters to the rodeo and was surprised at all the growth. Main St is (with a few interruptions)  continuously developed to the 3800 block. Can't wait to see what the new high rises and the redevelopment of the old Sears is going to do. I believe population density within the Loop will hit record highs by 2020 census.

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Luminare said:

Updated list:

 

1 - KBR / East River Site

2 - TMC Research Campus 

3 - Sears building conversion to Houston's Innovation District

4 - MFAH expansion project

5 - Cayden's 3 towers for midtown

6 - Block 58 - Hines 47 story office building on old Houston Chronicle site + Block 42 - Hines 46 story residential tower

7 - Hanover mixed use at 3540 W. Dallas + The Allen mixed use at Allen Pkwy & Gillette (Allen Pkwy Major Developments)

8 - McNair mixed use at Post Oak & Richmond (former design by Munoz + Albin)

9 - Upper Kirby / Greenway Major Developments: The RO, Hanover Post Oak, etc...

10 - Major Infrastructure Overhauls: 59/45 Reconstruction + Downtown Greenbelt + Bayou Canal, The Blvd Project, Lower Westheimer Project, METRO Next (even though it leaves a lot to be desired. Its still something), HSR Station at Mall Site.

 

I've officially moved KBR / East River Site from #8 to #1. I think we can all agree, right?

 

Update 2 (as of 3/6/2019)

 

1 - KBR / East River Site (insert *its happening* gif)

2 - Sears building conversion to Houston's Innovation District (insert *its happening* gif)

3 - Block 58 - Hines 47 story office building on old Houston Chronicle site + Block 42 - Hines 46 story residential tower (insert *its happening* gif)

4 - MFAH expansion project (insert *its happening* gif)

5 - TMC Research Campus 

6 - Cayden's 3 towers for midtown

7 - Hanover mixed use at 3540 W. Dallas + The Allen mixed use at Allen Pkwy & Gillette (Allen Pkwy Major Developments)

8 - McNair mixed use at Post Oak & Richmond (former design by Munoz + Albin)

9 - Upper Kirby / Greenway Major Developments: The RO, Hanover River Oaks, etc...

10 - Major Infrastructure Overhauls: 59/45 Reconstruction + Downtown Greenbelt + Bayou Canal, The Blvd Project, Lower Westheimer Project, METRO Next (even though it leaves a lot to be desired. Its still something), HSR Station at Mall Site.

 

After some pondering earlier today I've decided to update the rankings once more. I think after this I'm going to restrict any change in the rankings until maybe 1 a week or every 2 weeks. That way it doesn't get crazy. With some much going on and things happening so quickly I decided to make a last minute change this one time. What do y'all think? Maybe it should be once a month?

 

Anyway, changes were anything that is "happening" means its actually going on has been shifted to the top. I believe we should always maintain top rankings to active projects with momentum and boots on the ground. We just got a latest update that they are starting to gut the Sears building which moves it further up. Blocks 58 and soon 42 are happening. MFAH stays at number 4 because its in active construction. This means TMC3 moves to #5.

 

EDIT: should be Hanover River oaks, and not Hanover Post Oak @Houston19514

Edited by Luminare
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9.  Upper Kirby / Greenway Major Developments: The RO, Hanover Post Oak, etc...

 

Shouldn't this be "Hanover River Oaks", not "Hanover Post Oak"?

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36 minutes ago, Houston19514 said:

9.  Upper Kirby / Greenway Major Developments: The RO, Hanover Post Oak, etc...

 

Shouldn't this be "Hanover River Oaks", not "Hanover Post Oak"?

 

Made the change. Thanks.

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It could have a brunch place called "Hangover River Oaks"

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20 minutes ago, cspwal said:

It could have a brunch place called "Hangover River Oaks"

 

maybe put it on the other side of the street from Lamar High School? Heard those kids party pretty hard.

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On 3/1/2019 at 12:35 AM, j_cuevas713 said:

Wow we finally moved up! I can’t believe we’re an alpha city 😮

 

Not sure how I missed this ... this IS news.

 

Wow!

 

It’s been a while since I looked at the list but it does seem rather skewed for European cities. Prague, Budapest, Dublin, Stockholm, Lisbon, and (especially) Luxembourg seem way overrated, all rated the same as Amsterdam. You must score points for being a national capital.

 

Likewise, Warsaw and Milan as Alpha cities seems to be a bit of an overstatement.

 

I seem to recall a couple of years ago Houston was one notch below Dallas.

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Yes it’s true, Dallas, Atlanta, and Boston all previously had Alpha- ranking in 2008 but have since been downgraded. Would love to know how Houston somehow came to outrank Dallas and Boston (Atlanta I get) given their own superior economic statistics since then. Maybe the data lag by 2 (or more) years.

 

It also seems to be the case that the list as shown are relative rankings. And Houston has been behind Dallas and Atlanta (sometimes way behind both) in every year except this one. Seems like they must have changed their criteria. (Of course I’m biased so I think this new criteria is more representative!)

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8 hours ago, mattyt36 said:

Yes it’s true, Dallas, Atlanta, and Boston all previously had Alpha- ranking in 2008 but have since been downgraded. Would love to know how Houston somehow came to outrank Dallas and Boston (Atlanta I get) given their own superior economic statistics since then. Maybe the data lag by 2 (or more) years.

 

It also seems to be the case that the list as shown are relative rankings. And Houston has been behind Dallas and Atlanta (sometimes way behind both) in every year except this one. Seems like they must have changed their criteria. (Of course I’m biased so I think this new criteria is more representative!)

 

In 2008, Atlanta was Beta+, Dallas and Boston were Beta and Houston was Beta-  https://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/images/world2008t.jpg

 

FWIW, in 2004, Atlanta was Beta and Dallas, Boston and Houston were all Beta-

In 2010, Boston, Dallas and Atlanta were Alpha-, Houston was Beta+alpha

In 2012, Boston and Atlanta were Alpha-,  Dallas and Houston were Beta+

In 2016 and 2017, all 4 were Beta+

 

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2 hours ago, Houston19514 said:

 

In 2008, Atlanta was Beta+, Dallas and Boston were Beta and Houston was Beta-  https://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/images/world2008t.jpg

 

FWIW, in 2004, Atlanta was Beta and Dallas, Boston and Houston were all Beta-

In 2010, Boston, Dallas and Atlanta were Alpha-, Houston was Beta+alpha

In 2012, Boston and Atlanta were Alpha-,  Dallas and Houston were Beta+

In 2016 and 2017, all 4 were Beta+

 

 

Since the list is not alphabetical or organized by geography, I can only assume it is a relative ranking.  Houston ranked below all 3 in every year I can find.

 

https://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/gawcworlds.html

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The group that designated Houston an Alpha city is based out of the UK. They are called GaWC.  I do not know what ranking Houston may have via other organizations.

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U-haul is upgrading from a half block, single story building with a parking lot for trucks on the roof, to a multi-story storage building (with I assume some parking for U-haul trucks because how else are you going to get your crap to and from the storage place)

 

 

Quote

I talked with the guy collecting the cement samples and said it was going to be a 6 stories high U-Haul storage. 4 stories of storage and 2 of their retail store. He said that they saw a need for a storage with all the people moving downtown.

- Hinedesky

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Posted (edited)

Not a bad decade 2010-2020 (I fudged a little taking buildings completing a few years after)

Source: http://www.skyscrapercenter.com/city/houston

 

 

Building Name Height (ft) Floors Completion
609 Main at Texas 755 48 2017
Texas Tower 735 47 2021
BG Group Place 632 46 2011
Capitol Tower 579 34 2019
The Preston 550 46 2022
2929 Weslayan 533 40 2015
Methodist Outpatient Care Center 512 26 2010
Market Square Tower 502 40 2017
The Post Oak 499 36 2018
Hess Tower 490 29 2010
1500 Post Oak Boulevard 477 30 2016
Hanover River Oaks 462 38 2020
Texas Children`s Hospital Expansion 457 25 2018
Latitude Med Center 423 35 2018
M.D. Anderson Administrative Support Building 415 25 2012
Residences at La Colombe d’Or 400 34 2020
Arabella 399 33 2018
Methodist Inpatient Hospital 395 17 2018
Aris Market Square 371 32 2017
Marriott Marquis Houston 371 28 2016
Amegy Tower 354 24 2016
3300 Main 351 28 2020
Hilcorp Energy Tower 346 23 2016
The Kirby Collection Residential Tower 340 22 2017
Le Meridien Hotel 338 25 2017
Catalyst 334 28 2017
Post Oak 330 29 2014
Hanover Montrose 326 30 2016
Astoria 322 25 2016
SkyHouse River Oaks 284 25 2015
The Southmore 284 24 2017
The Sovereign 280 21 2014
SkyHouse Houston 275 24 2014
Texas Children's Hospital Pavilion for Women 269 14 2012
Hotel Alessandra 263 21 2017
SkyHouse Main 262 24 2016
Vantage Med Center 260 22 2017
6565 MD Anderson Boulevard 253 13 2014
Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute 252 13 2010
Two BriarLake Plaza 251 18 2014
InterContinental Houston Medical Center 244 21 2019
The Carter 224 20 2017
Innovation Tower   48 2021
Tower at Hermann Place   42 2020
Noble Energy Center Two   20 2015

 

Edited by Timoric
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3 hours ago, Timoric said:

Not a bad decade 2010-2020 (I fudged a little taking buildings completing a few years after)

Source: http://www.skyscrapercenter.com/city/houston

 

 

Building Name Height (ft) Floors Completion
609 Main at Texas 755 48 2017
Texas Tower 735 47 2021
BG Group Place 632 46 2011
Capitol Tower 579 34 2019
The Preston 550 46 2022
2929 Weslayan 533 40 2015
Methodist Outpatient Care Center 512 26 2010
Market Square Tower 502 40 2017
The Post Oak 499 36 2018
Hess Tower 490 29 2010
1500 Post Oak Boulevard 477 30 2016
Hanover River Oaks 462 38 2020
Texas Children`s Hospital Expansion 457 25 2018
Latitude Med Center 423 35 2018
M.D. Anderson Administrative Support Building 415 25 2012
Residences at La Colombe d’Or 400 34 2020
Arabella 399 33 2018
Methodist Inpatient Hospital 395 17 2018
Aris Market Square 371 32 2017
Marriott Marquis Houston 371 28 2016
Amegy Tower 354 24 2016
3300 Main 351 28 2020
Hilcorp Energy Tower 346 23 2016
The Kirby Collection Residential Tower 340 22 2017
Le Meridien Hotel 338 25 2017
Catalyst 334 28 2017
Post Oak 330 29 2014
Hanover Montrose 326 30 2016
Astoria 322 25 2016
SkyHouse River Oaks 284 25 2015
The Southmore 284 24 2017
The Sovereign 280 21 2014
SkyHouse Houston 275 24 2014
Texas Children's Hospital Pavilion for Women 269 14 2012
Hotel Alessandra 263 21 2017
SkyHouse Main 262 24 2016
Vantage Med Center 260 22 2017
6565 MD Anderson Boulevard 253 13 2014
Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute 252 13 2010
Two BriarLake Plaza 251 18 2014
InterContinental Houston Medical Center 244 21 2019
The Carter 224 20 2017
Innovation Tower   48 2021
Tower at Hermann Place   42 2020
Noble Energy Center Two   20 2015

 

I count 46, since SkyHouse Main are twins. Thanks for your work Timoric.

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Posted (edited)

 

As impressive as that is, Skyscraper Center is frustratingly incomplete.  Incorporating information from Emporis, the list looks like this (I count 85, not including Innovation Tower and Tower at Hermann Place, which I think are both still pretty speculative):

 

Edit:  Add Hyatt Regency Galleria     186'   14 floors  2015

 

Building Name

Height (ft)

Floors

Completion

609 Main at Texas

755

48

2017

Texas Tower

735

47

2021

BG Group Place

632

46

2011

Capitol Tower

579

34

2019

The Preston

550

46

2022

2929 Weslayan

533

40

2015

Methodist Outpatient Care Center

512

26

2010

Market Square Tower

502

40

2017

The Post Oak

499

36

2018

Hess Tower

490

29

2010

1500 Post Oak Boulevard

477

30

2016

Hanover River Oaks

462

38

2020

Texas Children`s Hospital Expansion

457

25

2018

Vantage Post Oak

 

453

 

40

 

2018

 

Latitude Med Center

423

35

2018

M.D. Anderson Administrative Support Building

415

25

2012

Residences at La Colombe d’Or

400

34

2020

Arabella

399

33

2018

Methodist Inpatient Hospital

395

17

2018

Sarofim Pavilion (Memorial Hermann)

 

380

 

15

 

2019

 

Hanover BLVD Place

 

375

 

30

 

2019

 

Aris Market Square

371

32

2017

Marriott Marquis Houston

371

28

2016

Energy Center Four

 

355

 

22

 

2016

 

Amegy Tower

354

24

2016

3300 Main

351

28

2020

Hilcorp Energy Tower

346

23

2016

The Driscoll at River Oaks

 

345

 

29

 

2021

 

The Kirby Collection Residential Tower

340

22

2017

Le Meridien Hotel

 

338

 

25

 

2017

 

Catalyst

334

28

2017

Hanover Post Oak

330

29

2014

2850 Fannin (Caydon)

 

328

 

28

 

2019

 

Belfiore

 

328

 

26

 

2016

 

Hanover Montrose

326

30

2016

Millenium Tower II

 

326

 

22

 

2015

 

The Sterling at Memorial Villages

 

322

 

27

 

2010

 

Astoria

322

25

2016

Energy Center Three

 

317

 

20

 

2014

 

Noble Energy Center Two

 

  307

 

20

 

2015

 

Energy Center Five

 

302

 

18

 

2016

 

Air Liquide Center I

 

301

 

20

 

2015

 

3737 Buffalo Speedway

 

290

 

18

 

2015

 

SkyHouse River Oaks

284

25

2015

The Southmore

284

24

2017

BBVA Compass Plaza

 

280

 

22

 

2013

 

The Sovereign

280

21

2014

Westin Houston Memorial City

 

278

 

22

 

2010

 

SkyHouse Houston

275

24

2014

M5250

 

274

 

22

 

2013

 

3009 Post Oak Boulevard

 

274

 

20

 

2013

 

Phillips 66 South Tower

 

274

 

16

 

2016

 

Texas Children’s Hospital Pavilion for Women

269

14

2012

Hotel Alessandra

263

21

2017

SkyHouse Main

262

24

2016

Vantage Med Center

260

22

2017

Camden Downtown I

 

255

 

21

 

2020

 

Marlowe

 

255

 

20

 

2018

 

6565 MD Anderson Boulevard

253

13

2014

Energy Tower III

 

252

 

17

 

2014

 

Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute

252

13

2010

Two BriarLake Plaza

251

18

2014

InterContinental Houston Medical Center

244

21

2019

Embassy Suites Hotel Downtown

 

242

 

19

 

2011

 

Phillips 66 North Tower

 

242

 

14

 

2016

 

Hotel ZaZa Memorial City

 

228

 

17

 

2017

 

Houston Methodist Research Institute

 

226

 

12

 

2010

 

Murphy Exploration Building

 

225

 

14

 

2013

 

The Carter

224

20

2017

San Felipe Place

 

223

 

17

 

2015

 

Nexen Center

 

219

 

14

 

2012

 

Hyatt Place Houston Galleria

 

218

 

12

 

2016

 

One Grove Street

 

216

 

16

 

2016

 

Residnce Inn Medical Center

 

214

 

16

 

2019

 

West Memorial Place II

 

212

 

14

 

2016

 

The Wilshire

 

208

 

17

 

2017

 

The Blossom Hotel

 

203

 

16

 

2019

 

Kirby Collection Office Building

 

202

 

13

 

2017

 

City Center Five

 

194

 

15

 

2015

 

Hampton Inn/Homewood Suites Downtown

 

192

 

14

 

2016

 

Briarpark Green

 

192

 

12

 

2013

 

West Memorial Place I

 

190

 

12

 

2015

 

Highland Tower

 

186

 

17

 

2010

 

 

Gables Westcreek

 

173

 

15

 

2020

 

Brazos Towers at Bayou Manor

 

173

 

14

 

2015

 

Innovation Tower

  638

 

48

2021

Tower at Hermann Place

559

 

42

2020

Noble Energy Center Two

 

  307

 

20

 

2015

 

Edited by Houston19514
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List from prior post revised to add Hyatt Regency Galleria and suburban area buildings (primarily The Woodlands)  The count is up to 93, not including Innovation Tower and Tower at Hermann Place:

 

Building Name

Height (ft)

Floors

Completion

609 Main at Texas

755

48

2017

Texas Tower

735

47

2021

BG Group Place

632

46

2011

Capitol Tower

579

34

2019

The Preston

550

46

2022

2929 Weslayan

533

40

2015

Methodist Outpatient Care Center

512

26

2010

Market Square Tower

502

40

2017

The Post Oak

499

36

2018

Hess Tower

490

29

2010

1500 Post Oak Boulevard

477

30

2016

Hanover River Oaks

462

38

2020

Texas Children`s Hospital Expansion

457

25

2018

Vantage Post Oak

453

40

2018

Latitude Med Center

423

35

2018

M.D. Anderson Administrative Support Building

415

25

2012

Hackett Tower (The Woodlands)

408

31

2014

Residences at La Colombe d’Or

400

34

2020

Arabella

399

33

2018

Methodist Inpatient Hospital

395

17

2018

Sarofim Pavilion (Memorial Hermann)

380

15

2019

Hanover BLVD Place

375

30

2019

Aris Market Square

371

32

2017

Marriott Marquis Houston

371

28

2016

Energy Center Four

355

22

2016

Amegy Tower

354

24

2016

3300 Main

351

28

2020

Hilcorp Energy Tower

346

23

2016

The Driscoll at River Oaks

345

29

2021

The Kirby Collection Residential Tower

340

22

2017

Le Meridien Hotel

338

25

2017

Catalyst

334

28

2017

Hanover Post Oak

330

29

2014

2850 Fannin (Caydon)

328

28

2019

Belfiore

328

26

2016

Hanover Montrose

326

30

2016

Millenium Tower II

326

22

2015

The Sterling at Memorial Villages

322

27

2010

Astoria

322

25

2016

Energy Center Three

317

20

2014

Noble Energy Center Two

  307

20

2015

Energy Center Five

302

18

2016

Air Liquide Center I

301

20

2015

3737 Buffalo Speedway

290

18

2015

SkyHouse River Oaks

284

25

2015

The Southmore

284

24

2017

BBVA Compass Plaza

280

22

2013

The Sovereign

280

21

2014

Westin Houston Memorial City

278

22

2010

SkyHouse Houston

275

24

2014

M5250

274

22

2013

3009 Post Oak Boulevard

274

20

2013

Phillips 66 South Tower

274

16

2016

Texas Children’s Hospital Pavilion for Women

269

14

2012

Hotel Alessandra

263

21

2017

SkyHouse Main

262

24

2016

Vantage Med Center

260

22

2017

Camden Downtown I

255

21

2020

Marlowe

255

20

2018

6565 MD Anderson Boulevard

253

13

2014

Energy Tower III

252

17

2014

Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute

252

13

2010

Two BriarLake Plaza

251

18

2014

InterContinental Houston Medical Center

244

21

2019

Embassy Suites Hotel Downtown

242

19

2011

Phillips 66 North Tower

242

14

2016

Hotel ZaZa Memorial City

228

17

2017

Houston Methodist Research Institute

226

12

2010

Murphy Exploration Building

225

14

2013

The Carter

224

20

2017

San Felipe Place

223

17

2015

Nexen Center

219

14

2012

Hyatt Place Houston Galleria

218

12

2016

One Grove Street

216

16

2016

Residnce Inn Medical Center

214

16

2019

West Memorial Place II

212

14

2016

The Wilshire

208

17

2017

The Blossom Hotel

203

16

2019

Kirby Collection Office Building

202

13

2017

City Center Five

194

15

2015

Hampton Inn/Homewood Suites Downtown

192

14

2016

Briarpark Green

192

12

2013

West Memorial Place I

190

12

2015

Highland Tower

186

17

2010

Hyatt Regency Galleria

186

14

2015

Southwestern Energy Building

180

10

2014

Gables Westcreek

173

15

2020

Brazos Towers at Bayou Manor

173

14

2015

1725 Hughes Landing Boulevard

171

13

2015

ABS Plaza

167

10

2018

The Westin The Woodlands

163

12

2016

1735 Hughes Landing Boulevard

158

12

2015

Three Hughes Landing

158

12

2015

Research Forest Lakeside IV

158

12

2014

Innovation Tower

  638

48

2021

Tower at Hermann Place

559

42

2020

Noble Energy Center Two

  307

20

2015

 

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Posted (edited)

Population numbers for the Houston MSA in from the Census Bureau.   July 2018  6,997,384. Rounding this is either an increase of 105,000 if you take the previous 2017 numbers of 6,892,000 or 92,000 if you take the revised 2017 numbers of 6,905,695. 

 

A pattern in the census bureau data is   Houston MSA is revised upward by 10,000 to 15,000 after the initial release.

Edited by Twinsanity02
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Population numbers for the Houston MSA in from the Census Bureau.   July 1, 2018  6,997,384. Rounding this is either an increase of 105,000 if you take the previous 2017 numbers of 6,892,000 or 92,000 if you take the revised 2017 numbers of 6,905,695. 

 

Nevertheless at a growth rate of over 1700 people per week we are clearly over 7 million.

 

I will stop obsessing about this topic now.

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4 hours ago, Twinsanity02 said:

Population numbers for the Houston MSA in from the Census Bureau.   July 1, 2018  6,997,384. Rounding this is either an increase of 105,000 if you take the previous 2017 numbers of 6,892,000 or 92,000 if you take the revised 2017 numbers of 6,905,695. 

 

Nevertheless at a growth rate of over 1700 people per week we are clearly over 7 million.

 

I will stop obsessing about this topic now.

I thought I was one of the few!  I’ve routinely said we’re at, or over 7,000,000 for the last several months.  Pretty impressive!  When I started college in 2001 we had about 4.1 million people here in town.

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On 4/18/2019 at 5:07 PM, Twinsanity02 said:

Population numbers for the Houston MSA in from the Census Bureau.   July 1, 2018  6,997,384. Rounding this is either an increase of 105,000 if you take the previous 2017 numbers of 6,892,000 or 92,000 if you take the revised 2017 numbers of 6,905,695. 

 

Nevertheless at a growth rate of over 1700 people per week we are clearly over 7 million.

 

I will stop obsessing about this topic now.

The numbers underwent some major revision, as there was one year (2017) that was previously identified by census as a no-growth year, but it has since been revised upward. Over a million in one decade. Still on track to surpass the Chicago metro in less than 25 years....

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17 hours ago, toxtethogrady said:

The numbers underwent some major revision, as there was one year (2017) that was previously identified by census as a no-growth year, but it has since been revised upward. Over a million in one decade. Still on track to surpass the Chicago metro in less than 25 years....

 

Not true.  The initial estimates for 2017 population showed Houston growing 94,417 from the prior year.  The revised numbers show 2016-17 growth of  93,435.

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Posted (edited)

Got these numbers from the Census Bureau ( except 2011 data). Think they are fairly accurate though even the Bureau alters their numbers somewhat. Anyway it show a very healthy growth of over 1 million in eight years or 134,000 per year. 

 

 

Houston Year   Total   Change  
MSA     MSA      
Population     Population      
             
  2010   5920416      
  2011   6057412   136996  
  2012   6175466   118054  
  2013   6313809   138343  
  2014   6497864   184055  
  2015   6647465   149601  
  2016   6798010   150545  
  2017   6905695   107685  
  2018   6997384   91689  
             
  Change   1076968      
  Per year   134621      
 

 

 

       

 

Edited by Twinsanity02
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Census keeps the previous estimates, so the revisions can be looked at. One day when I feel up to looking at the older estimates, I may see what revisions were made every year.

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On 4/24/2019 at 9:17 PM, toxtethogrady said:

The numbers underwent some major revision, as there was one year (2017) that was previously identified by census as a no-growth year, but it has since been revised upward. Over a million in one decade. Still on track to surpass the Chicago metro in less than 25 years....

DFW will get there first unfortunately, they have maintained a stubborn lead, I always hope it will change but it doesn't

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4 hours ago, Timoric said:

DFW will get there first unfortunately, they have maintained a stubborn lead, I always hope it will change but it doesn't

Relax, and remember they have to combine two cities to do that. We just count all of our suburban areas.

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7 hours ago, Timoric said:

DFW will get there first unfortunately, they have maintained a stubborn lead, I always hope it will change but it doesn't

No, they will not get their first.  You are talking about MSA numbers, which are completely different (and also are not as widely accepted as they can be a bit more arbitrary and un-precise.)  We are talking about CITY populations, not combined regions of various medium sized cities like dfw etc... 

 

Houston will probably get passed Chicago in less than 5 years as I see it, and easily we have already surpassed 7 million Houston area residents by this time as we are in 2019 and thus, the census may show the world some big Houston changes and surprises over the past 10 years or so.  I'm excited for it and Houston is a fantastic place to live and to be at this time in history.  Keep up the good work Houston !

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Google Earth updated for Feb 23rd 2019 now! Check out all that new development.

 

Discussion here: 

 

 

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18 hours ago, Triton said:

Google Earth updated for Feb 23rd 2019 now! Check out all that new development.

 

Discussion here: 

 

 

I shouldn’t be as excited as I am lol

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I always had a problem with people leaving out Fort Worth, when it comes to metro population talks. It's like they forget there's a city of almost 900,000 people right by Dallas. What I'm getting at is, without Fort Worth (taking in consideration what a Fort Worth metro population would be); the now Dallas metro wouldn't even be close to the size of Houston's metro. I mean we're 2x the population of Dallas, aren't we? 

Anyway, Fort Worth should be given a lot of credit, towards getting the DFW metro population to where it is now. But as we all know, Houston is The Giant City of Texas. 

 

Now that the rant is over. 

1 hour ago, nate4l1f3 said:

I shouldn’t be as excited as I am lol

Can't wait to spot all the updated parts in google maps!

 

 

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17 hours ago, TheSirDingle said:

I always had a problem with people leaving out Fort Worth, when it comes to metro population talks. It's like they forget there's a city of almost 900,000 people right by Dallas. What I'm getting at is, without Fort Worth (taking in consideration what a Fort Worth metro population would be); the now Dallas metro wouldn't even be close to the size of Houston's metro. I mean we're 2x the population of Dallas, aren't we? 

Anyway, Fort Worth should be given a lot of credit, towards getting the DFW metro population to where it is now. But as we all know, Houston is The Giant City of Texas. 

 

Now that the rant is over. 

Can't wait to spot all the updated parts in google maps!

 

The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metro Area (2018 estimated population 7,539,711) is divided by the Census Bureau into two divisions:

-- Dallas-Plano-Irving (2018 estimated population 5,007,190) and

-- Fort Worth-Arlington (2018 estimated population 2,532,521, just a tiny bit larger than the San Antonio-New Braunfels metro area). 

 

If we break out the two DFW divisions, the 5 largest in Texas would be:

(1) Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land

(2) Dallas-Plano-Irving

(3) Fort Worth-Arlington

(4) San Antonio-New Braunfels (SA is gaining on FW)

(5) Austin-Round Rock

Edited by Houston19514
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Posted (edited)

Dallas-Ft Worth is a humongous blob. There is no center. And people who live on one end only rarely go to the other. At the end of the day, that’s the difference between Dallas and Houston. Houston is also a blob, but, as luck would have it, it’s at the center of the blob, and anyone who lives in the metro area will say they’re from Houston. Go to the “Metroplex,” and you will hear from every other person how much they hate Dallas. Which is a shame. Because Dallas—the city—is a perfectly fine and perfectly livable place (in many ways much nicer than the inner core of Houston). You ask a Houston suburbanite about Houston, they say, “Oh so much traffic.” Or “I hear there’s a lot of crime.” But they never disavow Houston. You ask a DFW suburbanite, they almost universally say, “I hate Dallas (as in the urban core of Dallas). Why would I go there?”  It’s absolutely bizarre. Maybe it’s just my experience.

 

Very strange to me that the OMB considers DFW an MSA but not Washington, DC-Baltimore or San Francisco-San Jose. The Boston region is also underrepresented. I suppose that’ll come soon. 

 

What then?

 

I guess we would slip big time in the meaningless rankings.

 

I guess our best bet is to tell College Station to work much, much harder and become the next Ft Worth. 

Edited by mattyt36
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On ‎5‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 3:46 PM, TheSirDingle said:

I always had a problem with people leaving out Fort Worth, when it comes to metro population talks. It's like they forget there's a city of almost 900,000 people right by Dallas. What I'm getting at is, without Fort Worth (taking in consideration what a Fort Worth metro population would be); the now Dallas metro wouldn't even be close to the size of Houston's metro. I mean we're 2x the population of Dallas, aren't we? 

Anyway, Fort Worth should be given a lot of credit, towards getting the DFW metro population to where it is now. But as we all know, Houston is The Giant City of Texas. 

 

Now that the rant is over. 

Can't wait to spot all the updated parts in google maps!

 

 

 

The combined DFW population has some meaning because it is viewed as a "market size" by many national firms choosing which markets to expand to, do business in, etc. So Dallas tends to get national retail chains before we do; this is also because they are seen as "more like the rest of the nation," partly because of location, partly because of demographics. They also tend to attract companies that want a southwest location or a Texas location. More national real estate brokerages have offices in Dallas (or larger offices) and the Dallas office often handles the whole state. The airport factors in as well; the metro size makes the airport bigger and the airport in turn helps draw more companies to the metro in a virtuous cycle. And believe me, DFW does not shy from using their metro size ("Texas' largest metro!") in marketing themselves. If we ever passed them in metro size, it would be a great coup.

 

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On 5/6/2019 at 12:43 AM, mattyt36 said:

Dallas-Ft Worth is a humongous blob. There is no center. And people who live on one end only rarely go to the other. At the end of the day, that’s the difference between Dallas and Houston. Houston is also a blob, but, as luck would have it, it’s at the center of the blob, and anyone who lives in the metro area will say they’re from Houston. Go to the “Metroplex,” and you will hear from every other person how much they hate Dallas. Which is a shame. Because Dallas—the city—is a perfectly fine and perfectly livable place (in many ways much nicer than the inner core of Houston). You ask a Houston suburbanite about Houston, they say, “Oh so much traffic.” Or “I hear there’s a lot of crime.” But they never disavow Houston. You ask a DFW suburbanite, they almost universally say, “I hate Dallas (as in the urban core of Dallas). Why would I go there?”  It’s absolutely bizarre. Maybe it’s just my experience.

 

Very strange to me that the OMB considers DFW an MSA but not Washington, DC-Baltimore or San Francisco-San Jose. The Boston region is also underrepresented. I suppose that’ll come soon. 

 

What then?

 

I guess we would slip big time in the meaningless rankings.

 

I guess our best bet is to tell College Station to work much, much harder and become the next Ft Worth. 

There is a population ranking for world  "urban agglomeration"  which does that. I believe it is from Germany. There numbers are different from the OBM. Obviously this is not an exact science.

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It has to be safe to say that we are in a second boom for this decade, with 2011-2014 being the last one. So funny looking back how so many companies (especially CBRE) studying the market after the 2014 downturn said they saw a good recovery come 2018 and 2019.... and they were right!

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5 hours ago, Luminare said:

Since the previous image I posted in the Regent Square thread was so well received, I thought I'd do another one, but with a bigger scope that includes other big projects (not all for sure).

 

Often times, I forget that not everyone can immediately see the bigger picture like this in their head (because this is what I see all the time, and I have to for my own work), and images like these could be beneficial to everyone here (even me). So I decided that I'll try to do more of these. Our city is really changing and growing, and it will help us all to better visualize that change. A picture is worth a thousand words right?

 

Below is a quick compilation that I did in photoshop to give everyone here an idea of how impactful these developments will be visual on our existing landscape.

 

If the full buildout is done then this is what our city will look like:

 

MqbmP1Z.jpg

Superb!

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Oooh! ooooh!  Add Midway's HEB on Washington project! And the stuff around B&B! And all sorts of other stuff!

 

Basically, Luminare, can you make this your full time job please? Your city will thank you.

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