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Porter/New Caney - Valley Ranch Master-Plan Community to be by highway 59 and the new Grand Parkway.

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The Master-Planned Community will bring a town center, medical center, officesmultifamily homes, etc to the Porter/New Caney area. Tree's have already been cut down for Grand Parkway (visible to see on 59). The Grand Parkway will split the two sides of the community and will be 2 miles and a half south from the new Grand Texas Theme Park. 

 

 

 

 

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Here is a picture of the site.( Notice trees have been cut on the left to make way for the Grand Parkway)

 

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Edited by TowerSpotter

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Latest Update

 

http://www.yourhoustonnews.com/atascocita/news/construction-projects-continues-to-progress-in-east-montgomery-county/article_924305f8-82ca-5f9b-bfb8-3dbb15b9abad.html

 

 

 

Construction crews have already started preparing the area for the new roadway and there are lots of developments like the Valley Ranch Town Center and other entities that are eagerly awaiting more construction to the completed before they continue with their designs.

 

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HOK is designing the Medical Center. 300,000 Sq ft of Medical Office Space Alone.

 

http://www.signorellicompany.com/main/vrmedical.html

 

 

HOK, a global design, architecture, and engineering and firm (www.hok.com), has been hired to design the Medical District project. The process is well underway. HOK brings global expertise with 24 offices around the world including offices in the major population centers of New York, Los Angeles, Houston, San Francisco, Hong Kong, Dubai, Singapore, and Vancouver.

HOK has substantial experience in all facets of the design and development process, delivering over two billion square feet of healthcare space. Among their most notable successes are the Baylor College of Medicine and many of the facilities operated by the HCA and Methodist hospital groups. In 2013 HOK was ranked #2 in Modern Healthcare’s survey for top architectural firms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I'm very interested to see how the GP/99 extension over to 59 affects the sprawl. 

 

An interesting dynamic will play out in what happens to Porter between this and Kingwood. It has a chance to improve a lot. Hope that it does. 

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Convention Center?!

 

Wow!  Not every town or suburb needs one, and if every town has one they become far less of an asset.

 

And if you click the link on the above link - there's a bigger book... in that book it lists Exxon Mobil "World Headquarters" on the map of North Houston.  Interesting.  Probably just marketing, but still interesting to see that.

 

 

http://issuu.com/hokmarketing/docs/vrmc_bookpdf_pages_highres/1

Edited by arche_757
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Oh yea I know, I hope we get an in-out-burger over here ;)

Oh, my friend. I have been praying to the burger gods for that. HTown will go crazy for those burgers!! My son works for them out in LA, while attending college. ( UCLA, yeah i am a proud papa) Great establishment!

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I'm very interested to see how the GP/99 extension over to 59 affects the sprawl.

An interesting dynamic will play out in what happens to Porter between this and Kingwood. It has a chance to improve a lot. Hope that it does.

Well, I have some relatives that live in the Splendora/ Porter area. It's one of my least favorite places in the HTown metroplex; much too country for my taste. ( and not country in the good outdoors sort of way; more like redneck racist haven). Half of them welcome the new development/ Grand Texas Theme Park/ and all that will come with it. The other half are lamenting the Big City Ways about to decent upon their rural utopia. I think, like Katy, in 20 years, those who hold onto a more rural way of life and thinking will have either assimilated or moved away.

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Well, I have some relatives that live in the Splendora/ Porter area. It's one of my least favorite places in the HTown metroplex; much too country for my taste. ( and not country in the good outdoors sort of way; more like redneck racist haven). Half of them welcome the new development/ Grand Texas Theme Park/ and all that will come with it. The other half are lamenting the Big City Ways about to decent upon their rural utopia. I think, like Katy, in 20 years, those who hold onto a more rural way of life and thinking will have either assimilated or moved away.

 

I recognize clearly what you are describing. Once surrounded by valuable development, one can hope that the trashiness gets priced out. 

 

There is some nasty stuff going on in more "rural" areas that most people in cities are not exposed to. Parts of Porter are prime examples of the worst of it. 

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Well, I have some relatives that live in the Splendora/ Porter area. It's one of my least favorite places in the HTown metroplex; much too country for my taste. ( and not country in the good outdoors sort of way; more like redneck racist haven). Half of them welcome the new development/ Grand Texas Theme Park/ and all that will come with it. The other half are lamenting the Big City Ways about to decent upon their rural utopia. I think, like Katy, in 20 years, those who hold onto a more rural way of life and thinking will have either assimilated or moved away.

 

 

I recognize clearly what you are describing. Once surrounded by valuable development, one can hope that the trashiness gets priced out. 

 

There is some nasty stuff going on in more "rural" areas that most people in cities are not exposed to. Parts of Porter are prime examples of the worst of it. 

 

Among my cronies, we refer to that area as being "behind the Pine Curtain."

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Among my cronies, we refer to that area as being "behind the Pine Curtain."

 

I will be shamelessly stealing that phrase, though I will give credit if asked. 

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I recognize clearly what you are describing. Once surrounded by valuable development, one can hope that the trashiness gets priced out. 

 

There is some nasty stuff going on in more "rural" areas that most people in cities are not exposed to. Parts of Porter are prime examples of the worst of it. 

 

Please elaborate. I'm curious what you're talking about.

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Please elaborate. I'm curious what you're talking about.

People living in derelict trailer homes that may or may not have utilities hooked up. A lot of petty crime and drugs. Kids dropping out of school, etc. Pathologies of urban ghettos spread out a bit on country dirt instead of city streets.

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People living in derelict trailer homes that may or may not have utilities hooked up. A lot of petty crime and drugs. Kids dropping out of school, etc. Pathologies of urban ghettos spread out a bit on country dirt instead of city streets.

Not to quibble, but except for the trailer homes, you just described almost every neighborhood in Houston.

I kind of understand what y'all are saying, but it also makes me feel a little uneasy, like the phrase "poor white trash" does. Admittedly, something happens when you go northeast of Houston that doesn't happen in quite the same way when you go west or northwest, though with plenty of exceptions.

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Not to quibble, but except for the trailer homes, you just described almost every neighborhood in Houston.

I kind of understand what y'all are saying, but it also makes me feel a little uneasy, like the phrase "poor white trash" does. Admittedly, something happens when you go northeast of Houston that doesn't happen in quite the same way when you go west or northwest, though with plenty of exceptions.

 

That was kind of my point. It is a bad neighborhood in spots. I just get the impression that the national debate about bad neighborhoods is limited to those in cities.

 

Everything bad that goes on there, with a few exceptions made possible/impractical by space constraints, goes on out in the wrong part of the sticks too.

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obviously the developer is unaware of texans and their hidden valley ranch dressing.  you say "valley ranch" and i think baked potato, side salad, or fried zucchini.

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http://www.bizjournals.com/houston/blog/breaking-ground/2014/10/grand-parkway-exxon-inspire-new-submarket.html

 

New Caney, Porter, Atascocita, and Humble are now under the control of the Kingwoodianites. Now as someone with family in the northeast of Houston, I for one would like to welcome our suburban overlords and remind them as an active poster on HAIF that I can round up others to frequent the endless new front parking stripmalls, buy homes on cold-a-sacs, and to sit in the mind-numbing sprawl-induced traffic that will result.

 

Houston-Office-Submarket-Map-2014-copy.j

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http://www.bizjournals.com/houston/blog/breaking-ground/2014/10/grand-parkway-exxon-inspire-new-submarket.html

New Caney, Porter, Atascocita, and Humble are now under the control of the Kingwoodianites. Now as someone with family in the northeast of Houston, I for one would like to welcome our suburban overlords and remind them as an active poster on HAIF that I can round up others to frequent the endless new front parking stripmalls, buy homes on cold-a-sacs, and to sit in the mind-numbing sprawl-induced traffic that will result.

Houston-Office-Submarket-Map-2014-copy.j

Is this good or bad?

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At the moment, 59 is not as jam-packed with development as 45, 290 and 10 are. So there's room to grow.

 

But at this pace of development, they may soon have to stretch the Woodlands district all the way to the statue of Sam Houston.

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At the moment, 59 is not as jam-packed with development as 45, 290 and 10 are. So there's room to grow.

But at this pace of development, they may soon have to stretch the Woodlands district all the way to the statue of Sam Houston.

Woodland-Conroe / South Dallas office district

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Kingwood Medical Center has expanded significantly in the past 5 years. 2 new full service hospitals seems too much, but so does an acute care/standalone walk-in clinic on every major corner.

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Wow.  Right now development really peters out past Kingwood - now it will probably infill back down 59, sort of like Katy at 99

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