Jump to content

5-Story Apartments By NRP Group At 2400 West Dallas St.


guess

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 227
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 1 year later...
  • 1 month later...

It is interesting all of the stalled projects in this area (which is my neighborhood): This one, Sunrise MF @ W Clay & Montrose, Regent Square (since 2005!), development planned for site next to Fed (MF/hotel/office).  There is also the site at Allen Parkway & Montrose that seems will never get developed.  I guess the RE is so expensive no one wants to make a mistake.  All the while other projects get started/completed all of the time in what I believe are less interesting locations...

 

Thank goodness Weingarten was able to get moving on their new development at River Oaks SC and Stages was able to break ground on their new theater...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 10 months later...

So weird...i was just thinking about this plot of land this morning on the way to work...i remember driving by when that fire was raging! wow! can't believe it has taken this long to do something with such prime real estate. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • The title was changed to 2400 West Dallas (Formerly Axis Apartments - Burned Down)
  • 3 weeks later...

The HHA has been vague about a specific development site along "West Dallas" (likely for good reason) but the map shown in the latest press release looks to be at this location. The unit count is similar to the one that burned. Again...no idea if this is the site. Anyone know? This looks to be a site they are hoping to add as part of their new, mixed-income approach.

http://www.housingforhouston.com/media/56372/august 2019 board report.pdf (p61-64)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PTjtKsqvkGyv7rgOatspN7VwHzmqgUlF/view

 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree. The red dot on the map on page 2 (located in the first 'o' in 'Houston') aligns exactly with that site.
While a greater number of affordable housing units are desperately needed in Houston, building them in an area where luxury high-rises are springing up like mushrooms seems like an odd choice. 
Surely a less expensive site could be found that's conveniently located (while not in a slum or industrial area), and the money saved applied to the construction of more units.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, dbigtex56 said:

While a greater number of affordable housing units are desperately needed in Houston, building them in an area where luxury high-rises are springing up like mushrooms seems like an odd choice. 

 

I'm sure all of those luxury highrises need maids, maintenance, valet, lawn crew, etc. Projects like this put the workforce near the work. And if highrise people don't want their maid living in the same neighborhood, they should just clean their own home.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, phillip_white said:

 

I'm sure all of those luxury highrises need maids, maintenance, valet, lawn crew, etc. Projects like this put the workforce near the work. And if highrise people don't want their maid living in the same neighborhood, they should just clean their own home.

Can you give an example of that here because they can never seem to explain how exactly "local" workforce people are going to be given those units versus people who work in other sides of town. All for putting things in high opportunity zones but claiming it is for local maids and gardeners is a farce. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/1/2020 at 9:35 AM, iah77 said:

Can you give an example of that here because they can never seem to explain how exactly "local" workforce people are going to be given those units versus people who work in other sides of town. All for putting things in high opportunity zones but claiming it is for local maids and gardeners is a farce. 

 

I can't give you an example of a project that restricts housing to only those that work nearby (it's probably illegal). But you can imagine that someone who spend an hour or more on the bus to get to work would jump at the opportunity to live closer without paying a rental rate that is a significant portion of their income.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, phillip_white said:

 

I can't give you an example of a project that restricts housing to only those that work nearby (it's probably illegal). But you can imagine that someone who spend an hour or more on the bus to get to work would jump at the opportunity to live closer without paying a rental rate that is a significant portion of their income.

It isn't legal which is why the local workforce argument never works lol, and I promise these people won't be taking the bus which is why the project will most likely have the same size garage as any other project would. I think it would be visionary if they didn't have a garage to make this argument stronger so people who actually need to be close and use public transportation would actually live there. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/1/2020 at 8:07 AM, phillip_white said:

 

I'm sure all of those luxury highrises need maids, maintenance, valet, lawn crew, etc. Projects like this put the workforce near the work. And if highrise people don't want their maid living in the same neighborhood, they should just clean their own home.

In that case, the logical solution would be to include servants' quarters when planning luxury highrises. However, some workers may question such a paternalistic approach, as it  raises concerns about their employment and housing being so closely tied.
The "highrise people" you describe seem implausible, like characters in some lowbrow sit-com. However, if they existed I'm sure they'd appreciate the advice.
I don't know how to make my point any clearer. I want as much affordable housing as possible, not in an inconveniently located crappy neighborhood, but not wasting money on overly expensive real estate either. 
Seems pretty reasonable to me.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

But there's nothing objective about any of that. What's "overly expensive real estate"? What's "an inconveniently located crappy neighborhood"? 

 

This property is undoubtedly expensive, but I'm also pretty confident that it's cheaper than a comparable amount of land downtown. Cost of land *cannot* be the only determinant, or you're just replicating market forces and ending up with "affordable" housing in increasingly marginalized areas with worse and more expensive commutes. 

 

This lot actually seems like a perfect compromise: it's close enough to downtown and the service rich Montrose to be convenient, but it's not right in the middle so it's likely a bit cheaper. It's close enough to Buffalo Bayou to be convenient for recreation and exercise, but it's separated from it by a cemetery so there should be a bit less of a premium. There are multiple non-car transportation options nearby: buses and planned bike lanes on W Dallas, trails along the bayou.

 

If this lot doesn't meet your criteria, then where would?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Texasota said:

What's "overly expensive real estate"? What's "an inconveniently located crappy neighborhood"? 

 

1. Montrose, the Heights

2. Cloverleaf, Galena Park

 

1 hour ago, Texasota said:

Cost of land *cannot* be the only determinant, or you're just replicating market forces and ending up with "affordable" housing in increasingly marginalized areas with worse and more expensive commutes. 

 


Did I say that cost of land should be the only determinant? Did I even suggest that? No. I took pains to explain that's NOT what I meant.
Your remarks are appropriate and applicable to places such as Vail, or Aspen, or even San Francisco, where there is  a real shortage of affordable housing within commuting distance for those in the service industries. Houston? Not so much.
"If this lot doesn't meet your criteria, then where would?" 
There's property on the East Side, and in the Astrodome/610 area that is not what I'd call "increasingly marginalized". I'm betting that the land goes for less than it does in the 77019 zip code. Further,  the potential for development adjacent to the Light Rail lines has not been fully realized. These areas would take advantage of efficient transportation while also boosting ridership numbers.
I think I understand your concerns. We don't want to repeat the public housing mistakes that were made in the 1950's and 60's that have had such long-term bad effects on our society. Nor do I.
So let me say it one more time. We need to build affordable housing, and much more of it.
It should be built in places where people would actually like to live.
And it's preferable to build a greater number of units in a moderately priced area than fewer units in an expensive area. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Texasota said:

But there's nothing objective about any of that. What's "overly expensive real estate"? What's "an inconveniently located crappy neighborhood"? 

 

This property is undoubtedly expensive, but I'm also pretty confident that it's cheaper than a comparable amount of land downtown. Cost of land *cannot* be the only determinant, or you're just replicating market forces and ending up with "affordable" housing in increasingly marginalized areas with worse and more expensive commutes. 

 

This lot actually seems like a perfect compromise: it's close enough to downtown and the service rich Montrose to be convenient, but it's not right in the middle so it's likely a bit cheaper. It's close enough to Buffalo Bayou to be convenient for recreation and exercise, but it's separated from it by a cemetery so there should be a bit less of a premium. There are multiple non-car transportation options nearby: buses and planned bike lanes on W Dallas, trails along the bayou.

 

If this lot doesn't meet your criteria, then where would?

You realize that land by the bayou is worth about twice as much as land less than a mile away right? They could put affordable housing by the lower heights district for land about 40% less than this site.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, SMU1213 said:

You realize that land by the bayou is worth about twice as much as land less than a mile away right? They could put affordable housing by the lower heights district for land about 40% less than this site.

 

They are putting affordable senior housing along the bayou near Old Sixth Ward... that is some expensive real estate. Lower heights / First Ward / Old Sixth Ward will definitely have new affordable options.

 

Perhaps they choose location based the diversification of housing options in an area, as opposed to strictly land price / cheapest options.

Edited by Avossos
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, dbigtex56 said:

1. Montrose, the Heights

2. Cloverleaf, Galena Park

 


Did I say that cost of land should be the only determinant? Did I even suggest that? No. I took pains to explain that's NOT what I meant.
 

 

You cannot just exclude Montrose and the Heights entirely from affordable housing placement, and if you're starting with that assumption then you must be doing do entirely due to the relative cost of land in those neighborhoods. 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Avossos said:

 

They are putting affordable senior housing along the bayou near Old Sixth Ward... that is some expensive real estate. Lower heights / First Ward / Old Sixth Ward will definitely have new affordable options.

 

Perhaps they choose location based the diversification of housing options in an area, as opposed to strictly land price / cheapest options.

Lower Heights District is less than a mile away and you could build an additional 50 affordable units for the increase in land cost. Hopefully the city would rather have 50 additional units than build at a spot with some of the highest land values in the city less than a mile away. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, SMU1213 said:

Lower Heights District is less than a mile away and you could build an additional 50 affordable units for the increase in land cost. Hopefully the city would rather have 50 additional units than build at a spot with some of the highest land values in the city less than a mile away. 


why do you mention lower heights district specifically? Is there something in the works there?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Avossos said:


why do you mention lower heights district specifically? Is there something in the works there?

No. There are multiple tracts that are on the market in that area that I know the pricing of and it is nearby, so it is a good data point. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, SMU1213 said:

No. There are multiple tracts that are on the market in that area that I know the pricing of and it is nearby, so it is a good data point. 


I gotcha. I am curious what’s on the market over there. Perhaps some of the remaining warehouses along summer and party store on studemont? Maybe something on center? Lovett and Deal tens yo grab up most of the stuff. I was told the land off sawyer was purchased but the sign is still up... 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
9 hours ago, Fortune said:

I have never heard of the NRP Group. I wonder if the these are going to be market rate or affordable housing.

 

According to their website...

 

Our extensive range of projects and services includes:

  • Luxury apartment homes
  • Student housing
  • Senior housing
  • Affordable housing
  • Single family urban development
  • Property management
  • Land development
  • Design
  • Budget development
  • Project management
  • Building construction
  • Conceptual design
  • General Construction
 
 
They have a handful of properties in the Houston area. Mostly outside the Beltway.
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, thatguysly said:

 

According to their website...

 

Our extensive range of projects and services includes:

  • Luxury apartment homes
  • Student housing
  • Senior housing
  • Affordable housing
  • Single family urban development
  • Property management
  • Land development
  • Design
  • Budget development
  • Project management
  • Building construction
  • Conceptual design
  • General Construction
 
 
They have a handful of properties in the Houston area. Mostly outside the Beltway.
 

All but two of the properties are listed as navy/affordable versus their green/market rate. The other two are aqua/senior. Either way the newer properties don't look like garbage, especially in Austin. Have really nice pools too.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • The title was changed to 2400 West Dallas: New Apartments by NRP Group
  • The title was changed to 2400 West Dallas: New 5-Story Apartments by NRP Group
  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/6/2020 at 8:24 PM, Highrise Tower said:

The drawing mentions West Gray, but I don't think NRP has property on West Gray?

I don't know about this property, but am astonished at how often this happens.

I've seen several renderings on HAIF where the surrounding streets are misidentified.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
  • The title was changed to 2400 West Dallas: New 5-Story Apartments By NRP Group
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • The title was changed to 5-Story Apartments By NRP Group At 2400 West Dallas St.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...