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If Istanbul can put light rail by Blue Mosque/Sofia, University Line can go down Richmond


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In Istanbul right now, and just saw Blue Mosque among other things today. Light rail has a stop right in front of it. If a light rail can be made in this historic area, no excuses for university line going down richmond. Houston just doesn't want to get things done in transit, end of story.

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not fond of apples to apples, eh?

been there myself a few times Slick. would make more sense and be so much nicer if there were no (zero) individual vehicles or mass transit except walking at all in that entire several block area around Blue Mosque, Hagia Sophia, Topkapi.

so I don't get your point.

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not fond of apples to apples, eh?

been there myself a few times Slick. would make more sense and be so much nicer if there were no (zero) individual vehicles or mass transit except walking at all in that entire several block area around Blue Mosque, Hagia Sophia, Topkapi.

so I don't get your point.

The rail saves time going from the port. In general istanbul metro once complete will be very impressive. If they can build it with the obstacles of archaeological finds and earthquakes why can't houston have a world class system?

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The rail saves time going from the port. In general istanbul metro once complete will be very impressive. If they can build it with the obstacles of archaeological finds and earthquakes why can't houston have a world class system?

Does the government in Istanbul allow the kind of opposition we have here to influence its decisions?

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The rail saves time going from the port. In general istanbul metro once complete will be very impressive. If they can build it with the obstacles of archaeological finds and earthquakes why can't houston have a world class system?

[/exile]

Structures built from concrete and masonry in accordance with International Building Codes that are enforced in developed countries by governments that aren't rife with corruption are vastly preferable to wood frame structures that are built under the same set of assumptions. (Yet wood frame structures are generally favored in the United States because they are more cost effective, more forgiving, and less labor-intensive in a country where labor is expensive and cumbersome. An American developer intending to turn a profit should only build with concrete when they are deprived of every other option.)

So why do you suppose I should have to walk ten stories up to my $10/night penthouse on a windy day, because the hotel staff has decided to disable the elevator in this five-year-old concrete and masonry highrise? And once I get there, why do you suppose that the solid concrete wall behind my bed sounds like rats are chewing through it during the strongest gusts?

And would you consider the city that I'm in to be more "world class" because there are three dozen more buildings just like my hotel being hastily constructed by an effective government decree within a mile radius--of which a half dozen or more have turned out to be real estate scams for which construction activity has halted? Maybe that has something to do with why there are so many Bentleys on the road. Would you consider a city like this to be somehow less provincial because the grand new suspension bridge is already rusting through and occasionally drops portions of its decking into the river below? But it looks really really cool, framed by mountains and sea, even if it can't fulfill its intended function of moving trucks safely from the port in a way that bypasses the chaos of the center of the city.

As far as I'm concerned, this is all fine and well. I'm happy to live in a provincial city because I think that life is better here, simpler, easier to enjoy. There are bigger cities that are more developed. Some of them even bother to treat their wastewater; but mostly, they're just as provincial with the same attitudes having been scaled-up in terms of pathological groupthink, hassle, pollution, and expense. The same sort of comparisons could probably be made on some level between Houston and New York, Manchester or London. To compare Houston and Istanbul, you have to compare two cities for 'world classiness' that not only exist at a different scale, but with governments, cultures, and economic systems that are totally alien between the one and the other. It is a totally asinine and superficial effort. Please stop.

[exile]

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The rail saves time going from the port. In general istanbul metro once complete will be very impressive. If they can build it with the obstacles of archaeological finds and earthquakes why can't houston have a world class system?

The rail is more necessary in that location because hoofing it up and down that hill between the Spice Market and the entrance to Topkapi suck. I know, I've done it more than once.

Istanbul's subway is state-of-the-art, as is its light rail system, but I don't think it's comparable to Houston simply because people in Houston want to go farther faster. I'm not sure what my point is here, but the two cities and their light rail systems just don't feel comparable.

The most impressive part of Istanbul's transit system is the use of modern funicular connections to link neighborhoods of different elevations.

And as for being "world class" -- A surprising number of people in Houston waste a surprising amount of energy wondering what it will take to make the city "world class." Here's a hint -- World class cities don't worry about whether they're world class, or not.

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The rail is more necessary in that location because hoofing it up and down that hill between the Spice Market and the entrance to Topkapi suck. I know, I've done it more than once.

Istanbul's subway is state-of-the-art, as is its light rail system, but I don't think it's comparable to Houston simply because people in Houston want to go farther faster. I'm not sure what my point is here, but the two cities and their light rail systems just don't feel comparable.

The most impressive part of Istanbul's transit system is the use of modern funicular connections to link neighborhoods of different elevations.

And as for being "world class" -- A surprising number of people in Houston waste a surprising amount of energy wondering what it will take to make the city "world class." Here's a hint -- World class cities don't worry about whether they're world class, or not.

I'm staying deep on the Asian side, and ride the new M4 line daily. I can confirm it is very fast, feels like the fastest subway I've taken. About 25 km in 6-8 minutes.

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