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Fixtures International built a driveway across their property that connects Allston and 5th.  But, you are correct.  There is a roadblock on the actual street.  There is still ROW that connects Allston and 5th.  All that would need to be done to reconnect those streets is to add about 10-20 yards of roadway. 

 

The intersection of 6th and Yale is going to bear the brunt of the traffic from the new apartments.  There are no plans to put in a turn signal.  That means that NB traffic on Yale would wait for people to turn left into the development and EB traffic on 6th would wait for people turning north on Yale St. (but not as long because traffic WB on 6th would mostly be residents).  5th street should be improved to provide additional access to Yale St. to mitigate potential backups, especially on Yale.  Trammell Crowe can live with having a slightly smaller complex.

 

 

 

A 380 for Trammel Crow!!!

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Nice looking with the brick and the one hold out.          

I like that end part, but man I wish we'd bury those power lines occasionally. haha.   Very nice pictures. 

Inner loop apartments are not all the same.  1.3 calculation includes many old inexpensive garden style apartments and is not exclusive to high end complexes.  Simple arrhythmic shows that two people can afford more apartment than one.  If you have data for high end complexes, then let's see it.  Otherwise, your reference to 1.3 is just pulling stuff out of your arse because it is not indicative of high end developments.

 

 

http://apmanagement.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/The-Apartment-Report_APC_7.8.13_PRESS-BREAK.pdf

 

Rents in many gateway markets nationwide tops $3/s.f. Expect to see rents creep up to more than $2/s.f. in 
Houston and Dallas. Texas urban infill projects breaking ground in the next 12 months will see a greater 
mix of one bedrooms, up to 75% or 80% of total units. New urban projects will also feature smaller units 
averaging 600 s.f. to 800 s.f. This trend will be fueled by Gen X, Gen Y and Echo Boomer renters that 
prefer to live alone and command high-tech dwellings.

 

 

 

I thought this was an interesting find in another post. It conclusively validates my point on this matter. The trend is toward more single occupant dwellings. Of course, anyone keeping track of demographics in the US knows that fewer people are getting married, fewer people are having children, and couples are having fewer children. Some people who are not as well read may not have realized that the demographics are changing.

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I thought this was an interesting find in another post. It conclusively validates my point on this matter. The trend is toward more single occupant dwellings. Of course, anyone keeping track of demographics in the US knows that fewer people are getting married, fewer people are having children, and couples are having fewer children. Some people who are not as well read may not have realized that the demographics are changing.

By means of comparison, look at Gulfton. Lots of older apartments with low income families and the highest density in Houston.

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 The trend is toward more single occupant dwellings. Of course, anyone keeping track of demographics in the US knows that fewer people are getting married, fewer people are having children, and couples are having fewer children. Some people who are not as well read may not have realized that the demographics are changing.

 

Another recent article on the topic

 

http://houston.culturemap.com/news/realestate/08-01-13-the-houston-apartment-markets-ugly-ducking-no-one-wants-these-units/

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From the article...

 

 

Ten years ago, developers would construct apartment complexes with 30 to 40 percent one-bedroom units, Epstein says. Today, 80 percent of the units in a typical newly built complex are one-bedroom units.

 

 

Well, that pretty well beats this subject into submission. Like I said, apartment occupancy is figured at 1.3 persons per unit. These percentages bear it out.

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Partial credit for what looks like a façade that is mostly brick and stone.  But, yeah.  Enough with the "pavilion" style thing already.  It actually looks like an architect was trying to borrow elements of a typical Chicago/Commercial style roof, but had to bow to the overlords and keep it within the usual "pavilion" style for these complexes.  Given what is going up around town, this could have definitely been much worse. 

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This may be the new design. Similar to Alexan Midtown, but it looks good.

 

11858083025_3d7dc8152e_b.jpg

 

1. This is an improvement from the first rendering.

2. This is all masonry, which seems to last and looks appropriate in Houston - I like that the trendy (and probably cost efficient) mix of fake stone or stucco is NOT in this rendering.

3. I can see this structure adding value.

4. Ground floor retail it seems.

 

Looking forward to this.

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4. Ground floor retail it seems.

 

 

 

Rendering probably is showing the leasing office, exercise room and other private amenities on the ground floor.  The developer consistently indicated no ground floor retail in discussions with the community.  Usual excuses about investors, parking, cap rates etc.  Could have been an excellent place for a restaurant/coffee shop.  Dry Creek will be busting at the seems when this opens.   

 

Design is definitely a big improvement over the last rendering.  Nice deco inspired design elements in the raised brick patterns and taper to the roof line.  Looks like they are actually trying with this one.

 

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well this was an interesting thread to read lol. y'all really like to compare apples to oranges on this one. Just going to leave a few points and then slowly walk away xD

 

1. Nice pics :)

 

2. Houston may have lots of people, but a majority of the city is the density of a small to mid size town. Now were we do have density....its pretty freakin dense, but suburbia isn't really the hallmark for "density".

 

3. Portland has certainly done quite a lot to help make it a better city (which wasn't easy at all. lots of push back from people adding new transit to the area). it has the luxury of acting like a large city within a manageable size. Houston is ridiculous large with expansive city limits. Trying to keep up with infrastructure in this town will always be a losing battle, but we aren't ramping up the investment in it to keep pace with growth. Houston is going to end up having the types of infrastructure problems like cities in Europe had in the mid to late 19th century where governments were very reluctant to invest in infrastructure and very conservative when it came to money. Its going to have to get worse before people in this town take the burden as a whole on their shoulders and demand more of the local gov. (with money in hand) to fix the problems or we will figure out a way for private biz to fix the problem who knows. Houstonians don't really know yet what sacrifices have to be made to live in a big city (little to no parking, contributing more taxes to help found capital improvements, diversity in transporation, walking places, localization).

 

4. I don't know what some people are smoking to think we are "running out of cheap land", but its freakin everywhere!. We are building a third loop for crying out loud lol. Its like a race right now to who spreads the fastest xD. West gunning for Brookshire while northwest gunning for Waller. Its true what some people have said for a reason for cheap land is that there is no restrictions on the size of the metro area, but there are so much more. The lack of zoning is a major component. Another is geology. The ground underneath most of this city is fairly useless as its nothing but craptastic clay with a high water table under it making the only thing we could ever do with this land is....you guessed it build on it!

 

Houston has the greatest potential out of most cities not only in the state but in the nation to really become a top tier international city......its just going to take a lot of bootstrappin, optimism, actual urban planning (blasphemy!) and 20-30 more years xD.

 

 

Edited by Luminare
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Great perspective! Can't imagine how the lone homeowner can hold out and always wondered what the parameters of the electromagnetic field covers. Those are some mighty transformers.

 

I think it is great that the one homeowner did not sell. At the end of the day this adds character, and somewhat maintains a residential, single family fabric / history of the neighborhood.

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I think it is great that the one homeowner did not sell. At the end of the day this adds character, and somewhat maintains a residential, single family fabric / history of the neighborhood.

 

I've seen this a lot, lately. IMO - a very sad photo.

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lol I see those but I don't know why you think it will be demolished soon because of those columns...? Just wondering.

A developer wouldn't waste money on a tract that small to make a little bit more room. Houston developers have no reason to make awkward angled structures, we have an excess of space to build upon. The columns line up with the ones on the other side of the property. I'd bet the homeowner is holding out for more money in court. 

Besides, the apartment would have to rent out the units facing the home for a much cheaper price. No one wants to look out onto a nice view of some overgrown trees and some dude barbecuing. On the other hand some of those renters will be looking out their window at a beautiful power station so who knows? I just don't see the developer putting in the effort to develop that minuscule piece of property if they weren't going to tear down the other lot

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A developer wouldn't waste money on a tract that small to make a little bit more room. Houston developers have no reason to make awkward angled structures, we have an excess of space to build upon. The columns line up with the ones on the other side of the property. I'd bet the homeowner is holding out for more money in court. 

Besides, the apartment would have to rent out the units facing the home for a much cheaper price. No one wants to look out onto a nice view of some overgrown trees and some dude barbecuing. On the other hand some of those renters will be looking out their window at a beautiful power station so who knows? I just don't see the developer putting in the effort to develop that minuscule piece of property if they weren't going to tear down the other lot

 

All the plans I've seen have them building on 3 sides of the holdout properties (there are two: one house, and one vacant lot). The existence of those columns shouldn't lead anyone to conclude the holdouts will be removed.

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All the plans I've seen have them building on 3 sides of the holdout properties (there are two: one house, and one vacant lot). The existence of those columns shouldn't lead anyone to conclude the holdouts will be removed.

 

By most developers' definition, the prevalence of the single family home will make this a "mixed use" development.

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New street under construction by Alexan

 

14461707668_f1e987b8c8_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.05.20 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

14461701939_6e636dbb62_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.05.26 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

Another new street by Alexan

 

14646126074_c1286db6e3_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.06.44 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

14648320005_771703fbcc_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.07.36 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

14668230223_83dec46b89_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.07.45 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

New sidewalk as well

 

14461707709_c70a0f5c9f_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.08.38 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

And new homes across the street

14461909387_c0e3b3d717_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.08.44 by marclongoria, on Flickr

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Wow! I'm really digging those houses in the last picture!

 

New street under construction by Alexan

 

14461707668_f1e987b8c8_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.05.20 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

14461701939_6e636dbb62_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.05.26 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

Another new street by Alexan

 

14646126074_c1286db6e3_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.06.44 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

14648320005_771703fbcc_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.07.36 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

14668230223_83dec46b89_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.07.45 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

New sidewalk as well

 

14461707709_c70a0f5c9f_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.08.38 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

And new homes across the street

14461909387_c0e3b3d717_h.jpg

2014-07-13 19.08.44 by marclongoria, on Flickr

 

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Here's an update that was recently posted:

http://www.alexanheights.com/alexan-heights/

On October 28, 2013 Maple Multi-Family TX Contractor, L.L.C. commenced construction of a 352 Unit Apartment Complex located at 655 Yale Street, Houston TX 77007. The project completion date is scheduled for December of 2015.

As you know, there are eight existing trees along the Yale Street frontage of the property between 6th and 7th Streets. Over the years, these trees have been damaged and pruned by utility companies, and while working closely with the City of Houston’s Urban Forestry Department, we were granted permission to remove the existing trees along Yale Street. The trees to be removed will be replaced with new trees to be planted during the first quarter of 2015.

There will be a total of 18 new live oak trees planted along Yale Street, each measuring over 22’ in height. Furthermore, due to the recent burial of existing overhead utility lines and power poles along Yale Street, these trees will be able to grow naturally without encroaching upon any utility lines, as was the case with the existing trees. Weather permitting, the existing tree removal has been scheduled for July 16, 2014.

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