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East River: KBR Site Puchased by Midway

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The cascading mini water falls leading into the bayou is pretty cool.

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Though I can't stand the name "East River" , a NYC knockoff, the plans look splendid.  It is in an excellent location, near the downtown and should extend the skyline. I assume they will plan for the expected inundations which will occur. 

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^^ The elevation of the property is actually quite high with an undulating terrain.  The only low point is where lockmat's description of "cascading waterfalls" is.  The River/Bayou over there is wide and the banks are deep and has the capacity for outflowing flood waters. There was no flooding from Harvey.  The only threat from high water I worry about, is from a sustained storm surge of a cataclysmic hurricane.  Hurry-up Ike Dike. 

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I like it, such a huge new development.  It would be very interesting to see what would become of the area immediately adjacent, north of Clinton drive and then on to the northeast into the fifth ward proper.

 

 

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^^ The elevation of the property is actually quite high with an undulating terrain.  The only low point is where lockmat's description of "cascading waterfalls" is.  The River/Bayou over there is wide and the banks are deep and has the capacity for outflowing flood waters. There was no flooding from Harvey.  The only threat from high water I worry about, is from a sustained storm surge of a cataclysmic hurricane.  Hurry-up Ike Dike. 

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This shows what's possible when you build a compact street grid in what used to be a large industrial site. Contrast this with what's happening west of downtown, where similar (albeit smaller) sites are developed as surface parking lots dotted with big box retail and pad sites. And Midway will end up making a lot more money per acre.

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26 minutes ago, Nate99 said:

I like it, such a huge new development.  It would be very interesting to see what would become of the area immediately adjacent, north of Clinton drive and then on to the northeast into the fifth ward proper.

 

 

 

The hard part is what happens to the residents if they get pushed. This area works because its an empty industrial site. Development slows if you don't have low income housing mixed in if you go into the fifth ward. You can see that slow downs with that type of expansion in areas like the second, third, and fourth wards, and near northside. There are areas that have historical designations and low income housing requirements. My hope is projects like this one bring in construction and service industries jobs that can be filled with the surrounding population and help lift everyone.

Edited by thatguysly

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The plan is first rate. Love the name East River. I could see the whole area east of downtown being referred to as "East River" in the future. It sounds better and more cosmopolitan than Eado ever will.

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3 hours ago, thatguysly said:

 

The hard part is what happens to the residents if they get pushed. This area works because its an empty industrial site. Development slows if you don't have low income housing mixed in if you go into the fifth ward. You can see that slow downs with that type of expansion in areas like the second, third, and fourth wards, and near northside. There are areas that have historical designations and low income housing requirements. My hope is projects like this one bring in construction and service industries jobs that can be filled with the surrounding population and help lift everyone.

Yes, there is a lot more politics in play here than "just build it already". You will have TIRZ 18 and 23 at play and TIRZ 18 has a long history of not helping developers. Instead they may redistribute the funds from this property back to Lyons Avenue where the board members investments are. ("SHEEEEEIIIIIIIIIIITTTTT" - The Wire on HBO)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70eU840lc38

 

It's strange how many entities are zoned in this property:

- TIRZ 18

- TIRZ 23

- East End Management District

Edited by Mr.Clean19

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22 hours ago, Angostura said:

This shows what's possible when you build a compact street grid in what used to be a large industrial site. Contrast this with what's happening west of downtown, where similar (albeit smaller) sites are developed as surface parking lots dotted with big box retail and pad sites. And Midway will end up making a lot more money per acre.

 

East side has more natural desirability than west side ever will have. There, I said it.

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6 minutes ago, Mr.Clean19 said:

East River Sec 1

2018-1450

07/09/2018

Class 3 subdivision preliminary replat

 

This tells us what?

 

Scroll over to the right and theres a link.  Reason for replat is to create 3 unrestricted reserves for 3 blocks totaling 22.70 acres at Jensen and Clinton Drive. I'd assume this will be Phase I.

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Very Impressive!

 

Reminds me of developments in the Netherlands or Germany. Very Contemporary European. Specifically the revival of an area called HafenCity in Hamburg. Really cool development that also is home of the new Philharmonic. This could be an excellent site to express new styles and looks. Possibly a good place to get a few signature buildings for the city. Lets hope they keep this line of thinking strong.

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Looking at the renderings for this project, I wonder how they can, with a clean conscience, build so close to the Bayou.  Less than a year after Harvey, I would suppose developers would design generous buffer zones between the water and their buildings.  Maybe I’m missing something.  Can anyone help me understand this?

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20 minutes ago, MarathonMan said:

Looking at the renderings for this project, I wonder how they can, with a clean conscience, build so close to the Bayou.  Less than a year after Harvey, I would suppose developers would design generous buffer zones between the water and their buildings.  Maybe I’m missing something.  Can anyone help me understand this?

It appears FEMA’s flood map indicates the bayou floods to the south at this location:

 

https://msc.fema.gov/portal/search

 

As I recall, there were reports this site did not flood during Harvey.  There is some elevation of the site over the bayou—note the waterfall in the planned waterway within the site. My guess is this jut will aid with flood mitigation while providing an aesthetic benefit on a day-to-day basis.

 

I have no idea how they intend to turn Buffalo Bayou’s waters blue, however.

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My family and I live 60 feet from Lake Houston. We did not flood. HEB in Kingwood is  more than two miles from the Lake. They were under more than 6 feet. It's all about altitude. I would suppose this land is elevated. 

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I like this project.  It will be great.

 

although I am repeatedly surprised that renders for this project (and other projects), in a town as diverse as Houston, continue to show (in this case) one women of color among all the dozens of “people” pictured.  Utterly tone deaf, in my opinion.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, UtterlyUrban said:

I am repeatedly surprised that renders for this project (and other projects), in a town as diverse as Houston, continue to show (in this case) one women of color among all the dozens of “people” pictured.  Utterly tone deaf, in my opinion.

 

 

I remember writing the same thing in the Canino's/Farmers Market thread. Also, we don't all drive Audis though I wouldn't object to driving one. :D

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Is Whole Goods an expensive organic hardware store?

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46 minutes ago, UtterlyUrban said:

I like this project.  It will be great.

 

although I am repeatedly surprised that renders for this project (and other projects), in a town as diverse as Houston, continue to show (in this case) one women of color among all the dozens of “people” pictured.  Utterly tone deaf, in my opinion.

 

 

 

Ah yes the question of our time. Do we need more equity and equal representation in renderings?....haha seriously?

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3 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

Ah yes the question of our time. Do we need more equity and equal representation in renderings?....haha seriously?

 

uh, yeah, we do... said the middle aged white guy.  This is Houston, not Salt Lake City.

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1 hour ago, UtterlyUrban said:

I like this project.  It will be great.

 

although I am repeatedly surprised that renders for this project (and other projects), in a town as diverse as Houston, continue to show (in this case) one women of color among all the dozens of “people” pictured.  Utterly tone deaf, in my opinion.

 

 

 

21 minutes ago, mollusk said:

 

uh, yeah, we do... said the middle aged white guy.  This is Houston, not Salt Lake City.

 

I don't see any children in this scene. Maybe this person hates children. This designer must discriminate against age right?

I don't see any little people in this scene. Maybe this person hates little people. I'm sure this designer must discriminate against height right?

I don't see any wheelchair bound people in this scene. Maybe this person hates wheelchair bound people. This designer must discriminate against cripples right?

 

All of this is nonsense and doesn't relate to the topic at hand and is merely speculation. This isn't some post-modernist critical theory class as part of some gender-studies curriculum at a local community college. This is a place to discuss the science and art of architecture. The discipline. The industry, and whats happening with it in this city.

 

As a designer myself you want to know whats most important to this designer? Getting that render done as quickly as possible so that it meets a hard deadline, and he/she hopes they have enough entourage to fill the scene.

 

The scene is whats important here. The materials used. The buildings on display. The colors. The technical aspects of it. The future of spaces in this city and how it will impact us. Instead we are getting into how we aren't meeting some mystical quota on each person we need in a scene. Who's standards are that by the way? Whats gives you two the right to determine this? I don't know about you guys, but I'm here to talk about the things I said earlier. You know, architecture? What are you here for again?

 

Also...I don't care if you are a middle aged white guy or an alien from outer space. If you want to talk about architecture then I'll listen. You being a middle aged white guy is the least interesting thing you can provide in regards to architecture.

Edited by Luminare

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4 hours ago, MarathonMan said:

Looking at the renderings for this project, I wonder how they can, with a clean conscience, build so close to the Bayou.  Less than a year after Harvey, I would suppose developers would design generous buffer zones between the water and their buildings.  Maybe I’m missing something.  Can anyone help me understand this?

One of the really cool features of this site is that they can build close to the Bayou and engage it. The development will be all about its integration with the Bayou. There aren't any other commercial projects that do west of downtown that I can think of.  And, again, this stretch of the Bayou has the capacity and rate of flow to handle major rain events. The banks are very deep and the elevation of the property is high enough that there was no flooding during Harvey, or any other time, that I am aware of. 

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8 minutes ago, Naviguessor said:

One of the really cool features of this site is that they can build close to the Bayou and engage it. The development will be all about its integration with the Bayou. There aren't any other commercial projects that do west of downtown that I can think of.  And, again, this stretch of the Bayou has the capacity and rate of flow to handle major rain events. The banks are very deep and the elevation of the property is high enough that there was no flooding during Harvey, or any other time, that I am aware of. 

 

Still seems that maybe there should be some kind of levy or berm to help shield or divert water. I do agree with some others it is cutting it a bit close don't you imagine?

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This is pretty high ground.  A levee or a berm really aren't necessary, and could have the effect of interfering with the interaction with the waterfront.

Edited by mollusk

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13 hours ago, MarathonMan said:

Looking at the renderings for this project, I wonder how they can, with a clean conscience, build so close to the Bayou.  Less than a year after Harvey, I would suppose developers would design generous buffer zones between the water and their buildings.  Maybe I’m missing something.  Can anyone help me understand this?

One of the really cool features of this site is that they can build close to the Bayou and engage it. The development will be all about its integration with the Bayou. There aren't any other commercial projects that do west of downtown that I can think of.  And, again, this stretch of the Bayou has the capacity and rate of flow to handle major rain events. The banks are very deep and the elevation of the property is high enough that there was no flooding during Harvey, or any other time, that I am aware of. 

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Remember. This whole property was already developed by KBR. It's not like this is new or reclaimed land. Flooding has never been an issue. With Harvey, the worst flood event we have ever seen, it still was not an issue. True for vertically all the East side.  That said...a storm surge, from precisely the worst hurricane scenario, could cause a backflow that could greatly impact the Eastern side of the city. 

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20 hours ago, UtterlyUrban said:

I like this project.  It will be great.

 

although I am repeatedly surprised that renders for this project (and other projects), in a town as diverse as Houston, continue to show (in this case) one women of color among all the dozens of “people” pictured.  Utterly tone deaf, in my opinion.

 

 

Harvard did this for their East End study. Be careful what you wish for. It was a very large lady yelling at her kids. Looked like something out of a ghetto walmart.

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Sometimes a berm is close to a river bend. I don't know about here. But the "Crescent" in New Orleans, the part of the city they built on originally is on the bank of the Mississippi. 

The land next to White Oak on 19th wasn't flooding, but a block south it was, and at 11th it was in houses many blocks deep. So it's not so much about how close land is as how elevated land is. 

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On 7/11/2018 at 3:29 PM, Urbannizer said:

Another subdivision plat filed. You'll have to run through the current agenda's spreadsheet to take a look.

 

https://edrc.houstontx.gov/edrc/login.aspx

I dont know if this will take you to the link directly but its is telling that they will be demoing the exsiting moving / storage company if they move from west to east. 

 

ftp://edrc.houstontx.gov/2018/Applications//2018-1450/SubdivisionPlatPDF_EastRiverSection1.pdf

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On 7/14/2018 at 11:02 PM, Naviguessor said:

Remember. This whole property was already developed by KBR. It's not like this is new or reclaimed land. Flooding has never been an issue. With Harvey, the worst flood event we have ever seen, it still was not an issue. True for vertically all the East side.  That said...a storm surge, from precisely the worst hurricane scenario, could cause a backflow that could greatly impact the Eastern side of the city. 

 

this I think is key to understand. 

 

It's not a greenfield, they're not building on pristine land to take away area along the bayou that acts as a natural flood control.

 

It's brownfield, you go and look at the site, it's actually concrete fields with grass growing here and there. The site is very elevated compared to the flood plane.

 

Even though the site is right next to the bayou, it is probably one of the safer locations to be in a flood.

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I noticed a couple commercial trucks were parked in the middle of the East River development yesterday.  In Section 1 where the warehouse is , workers were moving equipement around, possibly taking soil samples?

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That this is going to get done before Regent Square, which is in a much more desirable part of town, will never not be amazing to me.

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1 hour ago, Angostura said:

That this is going to get done before Regent Square, which is in a much more desirable part of town, will never not be amazing to me.

 

As someone who lives maybe a mile from the East River site and has been eagerly awaiting progress on this development, I take offense to your objectively-accurate statement regarding which would be the “more desirable” part of town. :P

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On 9/28/2018 at 7:24 AM, Angostura said:

That this is going to get done before Regent Square, which is in a much more desirable part of town, will never not be amazing to me.

Both of these will develop in parallel. They are similar but have different pulls for campuses. Suburban vs Urban

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Yes, Regent Square in the NE is for more of a Suburban environment. I know they want walkable and all of that but they will have plenty of parking and cater to a different group of people. East River will be a destination for people from downtown. It will be geared to a different audience. Thats why i believe that each site will develop differently and in parallel.

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28 minutes ago, Mr.Clean19 said:

Yes, Regent Square in the NE is for more of a Suburban environment. I know they want walkable and all of that but they will have plenty of parking and cater to a different group of people. East River will be a destination for people from downtown. It will be geared to a different audience. Thats why i believe that each site will develop differently and in parallel.

They seem pretty similar to me and appear to cater to the same group of people. Just one company appears to be more ambitious than the other.

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I agree that they’re similar. Both look quite urban, judging from renderings. There are highrises/midrises in both and both are pedestrian oriented w/office, retail and residential.  I love the unique opportunities and interactions that exist with the “East River” project literally hugging a long stretch of the bayou. I think this will be a major distinction between the two projects. But I guess final judgement can’t be made until both projects are somewhat built out. 

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