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3400 Montrose - New 30-Story High-Rise at Montrose & Hawthorne

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I really like it. A couple days ago I was driving by that building and thought to myself "that looks horrible, they should really do something with that." And what do you know? lol

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Eh, the current version has more character than this.

Haha I suppose, but the current version can't attract renters.

This lot + the Westheimer/Montrose block are the start of a pretty big change in the area or at least they have potential to.

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While I cherish each large building in the city, it's time for this one to go.

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This building as currently stands has as much character as a commie block. I embrace the change. And extremely sad M2M left. First place I ever walked into that offered Champagne.

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This building as currently stands has as much character as a commie block. I embrace the change. And extremely sad M2M left. First place I ever walked into that offered Champagne.

M2M "somewhat" moved next to El Real where Coco's used to be and is called "Fashion Studio" now. I'm sure they'd say it's a new store altogether, but it looks like all the same product and they probably still serve champagne...

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Eh, the current version has more character than this.

Depends on one's definition of "character".

Character or not, this building needs a serious face lift or a tear down.

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M2M "somewhat" moved next to El Real where Coco's used to be and is called "Fashion Studio" now. I'm sure they'd say it's a new store altogether, but it looks like all the same product and they probably still serve champagne...

True, but Fashion Icon has 1/3rd the clothing and floor space M2M originally had. Is the skybar closed? I was tempted to go to it for the view, but that's about it.

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Scott Gertner's Skybar closed some time ago because the landlord couldn't or wouldn't make necessary repairs. Gertner opened a new bar in Houston Pavilions.

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M2M "somewhat" moved next to El Real where Coco's used to be and is called "Fashion Studio" now. I'm sure they'd say it's a new store altogether, but it looks like all the same product and they probably still serve champagne...

M2M "actually" moved a long time ago across the street to the shopping center with Berryhill. I believe they were fairly recently locked out of their space by the landlord... Are you saying the same people who owned M2M now own Fashion Studio?

Edited by Houston19514

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The grapevine. Not sure how much truth there is to it or if it's just a rumor. The person who told me seemed pretty sure about it though.

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Perhaps they can add another bar on the roof.

 

My thoughts exactly.  It has the best view of downtown that I've ever seen.

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I heard that the Hanover group might be interested in demolishing this building and building a 30-story residential tower with retail on the ground level. If the deal goes through, the building will come down sometime before the end of this year. I hope they remove all the abestos from the building before it is demolished.

Edited by cityliving

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So sad I missed going up there and taking pictures when it was SkyBar. I do live just a few blocks away so I probably have a similar view from my roof though.

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I heard that the Hanover group might be interested in demolishing this building and building a 30-story residential tower with retail on the ground level. If the deal goes through, the building will come down sometime before the end of this year. I hope they remove all the abestos from the building before it is demolished.

Hmm..

The Hanover Company looks to start eight to 10 projects in 2014 nationwide with Texas, Coastal California and the Northeast on the radar. Look for the developer to target the Montrose section of Houston for a project next year. Hanover’s projects currently under construction are wood, concrete or wood over concrete parking structures.

http://apmanagement.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/The-Apartment-Report_APC_7.8.13_PRESS-BREAK.pdf

Edited by Urbannizer
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Solomon Cordwell Buenz is the architect for the high-rise, same architect that designed the BLVD Place residential tower for Hanover.

 

So, things have changed with the economy. We’re working in Texas, too. We have three projects in Texas. Two in Houston, one in Austin. In Houston, we’re doing one on Post Oak.

 

We’re doing another building over in the Montrose area and that’s in more of an urban area.

 

http://blog.chicagoarchitecture.info/2013/09/10/thinking-post-bust-chicagos-scb-is-planting-flags-in-cities-across-america/

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yeah its been talked about for a few months, since some article came out a while back about some Chicago guys talking about the real estate market in Houston if i recall correctly.. not sure if there is another thread for it or not but im excited to see what they come up with. the height should be fairly significant in the area, no?

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Saw on skyscraperpage that the 10 story Montrose building will be torn down and replaced with a 30-story highrise by Hanover. Anybody else heard this? Here's the Biz Journal article on the building...

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/houston/blog/breaking-ground/2013/11/iconic-montrose-tower-will-bow-to.html

 

Where did the 30-story part come from - the ssp poster?

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someone in the other linked thread for this said it would be 30 stories back around June. im not sure if thats been confirmed elsewhere or not.

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Thought this building really added some character to Montrose Blvd. Shame. Lots of smaller junk along that road they could have scraped off for their 30 story tower, but that seems to happen a lot.

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would you rather leave this building to crumble, vacant and unused.. just for the sake of "character" or would you rather take a chance at a trendy new 30 story residential high rise adding some flair to the area? i agree there are other areas it could of been built, but that still doesnt answer what you plan to do with this building. its already been bought and sold off how many times since 2010? that means more than one person found this building to be economically unusable.. what makes you think you can come up with a better solution than someone whose trained in this field?

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Thought this building really added some character to Montrose Blvd. Shame. Lots of smaller junk along that road they could have scraped off for their 30 story tower, but that seems to happen a lot.

Maybe in it's day it added some character - back when SkyBar was open, M2M was there, etc....now it's just an eyesore....the stone facade has fallen onto the sidewalk below....it's empty interior looks terrible when you drive by.....I look forward to a new building taking it's place....

Edited by HoustonMidtown
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Speaking of this area what happened to the Wetheimer + Montrose strip center where Half price Books and Specs holds down the whole center. What ever happened to the purchase. Wasn't someone talking about redeveloping that major piece of property into a West Ave. type mixed use project? Maybe with the news of this Hanover project it will spur on the other development.

Does anyone know any more about that. Thanks!

 

Hanover has really jumped in feet first. The Galleria area, two projects in the village and now this, besides a few more I know I'm leaving out..

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Back in the day?  You mean just a few years ago?!

 

And what is to say that working with a good architect/contractor one can't renovate this building for a profit?  I think Cloud713 needs to remove his/her Houston-goggles and take a look and see that buildings like this get successfully renovated ALL over the country.

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It is unfortunate, since it does have character and a nice period design.  Given the low floor height, asbestos, limited parking etc maybe owners thought the numbers wouldn't work for redevelopment.  Maybe it just needed more time for the right developer to come along.  The Plaza Hotel down the street had similar issues, but eventually an owner came along who was able to make it work.  

 

All that said, even back in the Skybar days this building had the funk thing going.  I remember walking in and thinking that it even smelled old.  

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Back in the day?  You mean just a few years ago?!

 

And what is to say that working with a good architect/contractor one can't renovate this building for a profit?  I think Cloud713 needs to remove his/her Houston-goggles and take a look and see that buildings like this get successfully renovated ALL over the country.

Maybe contractors have taken a look at it and determined it would cost too much to renovate...

Edited by HoustonMidtown

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Back in the day? You mean just a few years ago?!

And what is to say that working with a good architect/contractor one can't renovate this building for a profit? I think Cloud713 needs to remove his/her Houston-goggles and take a look and see that buildings like this get successfully renovated ALL over the country.

Houston goggles? I'm all for preservation but like midtown said, who's to say that contractors haven't determined it's not economically feasible? As I pointed out it's been through 2-3 owners since 2010. All of them obviously thought it wasn't worth restoring.. Sure many buildings are saved for the sake of history, but unless I'm not seeing what your seeing, this building lacks any real historical significance.

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Houston goggles? I'm all for preservation but like midtown said, who's to say that contractors haven't determined it's not economically feasible? As I pointed out it's been through 2-3 owners since 2010. All of them obviously thought it wasn't worth restoring.. Sure many buildings are saved for the sake of history, but unless I'm not seeing what your seeing, this building lacks any real historical significance.

 

No, but it's got style and it's a nice example of mid-century design.  Look, I'm not an advocate of preserve-everything-at-all-costs.  The Texas Tower/Sterling Building I'm happy to see go.  I'm not particularly worked up over Foley's/Macy's.  But this one has maintained its architectural integrity, it relates well to the neighborhood, and on the surface it seems it could be adaptable to other uses.  Like I said, the Plaza Hotel went through different owners who couldn't figure out how to make it work, until one did.  Same with the Rice Hotel.  And the city is better off for it.

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I'm saying:  It is possible to save this building, while Hannover could have pursued buying the large surface parking lot and big-box Walgreens across the street (or bought some of the empty lots further north) and preserved this tower.  Yet here we are getting a perfectly useful building that fits the quirky neighborhood and scale of the area just fine to be torn down and replaced by a building 3 times its size.  Seems like a waste.

 

Contractors work out budgets and developers/clients see if that works for them.  Architects make changes when budgets come in a little too high.  Suffice to say that there are a lot of stupid developers out there.  Money -as I'm sure you are aware- doesn't make one smart.

 

Just because a building has had 3 owners since 2010 doesn't mean that all of those owners were responsible, or that they had the financial backing to pull off a major renovation.  And just because those three owners couldn't didn't mean that the next guy to come along would also be unable to do so.

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I'm saying:  It is possible to save this building, while Hannover could have pursued buying the large surface parking lot and big-box Walgreens across the street (or bought some of the empty lots further north) and preserved this tower.  Yet here we are getting a perfectly useful building that fits the quirky neighborhood and scale of the area just fine to be torn down and replaced by a building 3 times its size.  Seems like a waste.

 

Contractors work out budgets and developers/clients see if that works for them.  Architects make changes when budgets come in a little too high.  Suffice to say that there are a lot of stupid developers out there.  Money -as I'm sure you are aware- doesn't make one smart.

 

Just because a building has had 3 owners since 2010 doesn't mean that all of those owners were responsible, or that they had the financial backing to pull off a major renovation.  And just because those three owners couldn't didn't mean that the next guy to come along would also be unable to do so.

i agree, im just trying to be realistic about the situation.

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As am I.  Saving an older building that is still very much able to be re-used is indeed something we need to do more of here in Houston.  I've long said that this next century in American construction is much more about reasonable re-use, and less so about innovating 100 floor skyscrapers.  Perhaps you are aware...but the building industry is devoting huge amounts of capital (both money and brain) in figuring out ways to preserve, and rehabilitate buildings that are pre-existing (whether or not they are historic).  It is about 85% of my work; but I also work in Galveston, and the mantra down here is SO FAR REMOVED from the "Tear it down!  Tear it down!" chants I hear echoing from up north.

 

Sad really.

 

Look.  We'll agree to disagree here.  You don't think its worth saving.  I do.

 

We both know that Hannover won't build a remarkable tower here, and that it will be nothing more usable to the rest of us than just a visual piece on the skyline.

Edited by arche_757

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Speaking of this area what happened to the Wetheimer + Montrose strip center where Half price Books and Specs holds down the whole center. What ever happened to the purchase. Wasn't someone talking about redeveloping that major piece of property into a West Ave. type mixed use project? Maybe with the news of this Hanover project it will spur on the other development.

Does anyone know any more about that. Thanks!

 

Hanover has really jumped in feet first. The Galleria area, two projects in the village and now this, besides a few more I know I'm leaving out..

 

That is going to be turned into a mixed use projects. The developer is PM Realty Group. Just announced today.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/houston/blog/breaking-ground/2013/11/happy-retail-tenants-could-slow.html

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As am I. Saving an older building that is still very much able to be re-used is indeed something we need to do more of here in Houston. I've long said that this next century in American construction is much more about reasonable re-use, and less so about innovating 100 floor skyscrapers. Perhaps you are aware...but the building industry is devoting huge amounts of capital (both money and brain) in figuring out ways to preserve, and rehabilitate buildings that are pre-existing (whether or not they are historic). It is about 85% of my work; but I also work in Galveston, and the mantra down here is SO FAR REMOVED from the "Tear it down! Tear it down!" chants I hear echoing from up north.

Sad really.

Look. We'll agree to disagree here. You don't think its worth saving. I do.

We both know that Hannover won't build a remarkable tower here, and that it will be nothing more usable to the rest of us than just a visual piece on the skyline.

Thank god the people of Galveston work so hard to preserve those buildings.. Galveston is a gem of a different era. I agree Houston tears down way too many old and historic structures. I was ecstatic to hear about them preserving the burned down Bethel Church and turn it into a park. That is the kind if innovative thinking this city needs..

I'll be the first to admit the main reason I'm looking forward to this is because of its presence in the skyline. I'm not from the area so it doesn't really effect me, though I guess that's also why I shouldn't have a say in this. You don't think there will be ground floor retail for the locals? And while I want to believe Hanover will build something great here I'll admit I'm not crazy about their tower at blvd place. Hopefully they take into account the artsy eclectic vibe in the area.

Edited by cloud713
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arche -- are you familiar with this building?  what about it makes you think it can be saved other than the fact that it is hasn't fallen over yet?  the place is falling apart onto those of us in the neighborhood that walk by it.  if you had deteriorating buildings falling on the fine citizens of Galveston, I suspect you would want the public nuisance torn down.  At least something is going in its place here.  

 

then there is the inside of this building, which from what I saw before it closed was equally neglected and further beyond repair.  

 

is there a single building in Houston that you think should be torn down or should every building currently standing be preserved?

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For my part, it's not so much that I have special knowledge of this building and how to preserve it. It's just that every mid-century building in Houston is the same scenario: Just beyond repair. No way to renovate. Pieces of it are falling! (The last being perhaps the ultimate Houston anti-preservation bs cliche, said about every old building, yet no one ever actually sees any pieces fall.)

Mid-century buildings are preserved and renovated in other cities around the world, notably in places like Vienna or Berlin, but I guess the builders in 1950's Houston just weren't as good, because every one of those buildings here has "structural issues beyond repair!" Funny thing is 30 years ago the developers were saying the exact same thing about Houston's early 20th century buildings, movie palaces, etc. Now what's left of those are finally considered historic and suddenly the structural issues are gone! All over downtown they're being renovated. But it hasn't dawned on these people that the mid-century buildings are historic, just of a different style, so they're all "beyond repair"...

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For my part, it's not so much that I have special knowledge of this building and how to preserve it. It's just that every mid-century building in Houston is the same scenario: Just beyond repair. No way to renovate. Pieces of it are falling! (The last being perhaps the ultimate Houston anti-preservation bs cliche, said about every old building, yet no one ever actually sees any pieces fall.)

Mid-century buildings are preserved and renovated in other cities around the world, notably in places like Vienna or Berlin, but I guess the builders in 1950's Houston just weren't as good, because every one of those buildings here has "structural issues beyond repair!" Funny thing is 30 years ago the developers were saying the exact same thing about Houston's early 20th century buildings, movie palaces, etc. Now what's left of those are finally considered historic and suddenly the structural issues are gone! All over downtown they're being renovated. But it hasn't dawned on these people that the mid-century buildings are historic, just of a different style, so they're all "beyond repair"...

 

While I would also prefer to see this building reused, I feel the need to point out that:

 

pieces of it literally fell off and hit the ground.

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