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This was announced earlier this year. More confirmation via the Chronicle

http://www.chron.com/business/article/Apartments-by-ballpark-could-be-grand-slam-3703726.php
 

Real estate developer Marvy Finger is buying two prime downtown blocks for a seven-story apartment project to be built across from Minute Maid Park.

 

Renderings and info as of 12/2013:

 

http://blog.chron.com/primeproperty/2013/12/ballpark-apartments-break-ground/#19082101=1

 

11522356105_a87dfa2077_o.jpg

 

11522423356_52c7558618_o.jpg

 

500-Crawford-Pool-Render.jpg

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Good news/bad news:

Good: more residential in downtown. More Activity in the MinuteMaid Park neighborhood.

Bad: they are demolishing the old hotel and asking the city to abandon Prairie Street between Crawford and La Branch.

IF the city is prepared to abandon Prairie (and it sounds like they are), they should require at least 2 things in exchange (in addition to money for the property). (1) the city should require that the pedestrian route be maintained along the Prairie path. We should not allow another superblock to cut off pedestrian access to MinuteMaid. (2). They should require ground floor retail space, preferably on all sides of the project, but most definitely along the Prairie pedestrian path and along Crawford and Texas.

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http://www.chron.com/business/article/Apartments-by-ballpark-could-be-grand-slam-3703726.php

Real estate developer Marvy Finger is buying two prime downtown blocks for a seven-story apartment project to be built across from Minute Maid Park.

Another project by Marvy... great to see some of those parking lots disappear although he is tearing down the old Ben Milam Hotel. Marvy's apparently ready to cash out sooner rather than later hence the reason he has so many projects in the works. strike while the iron is hot.

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Posted earlier today in the Ben Milam thread:

Good news/bad news:

Good: more residential in downtown. More Activity in the MinuteMaid Park neighborhood.

Bad: they are demolishing the old hotel and asking the city to abandon Prairie Street between Crawford and La Branch.

IF the city is prepared to abandon Prairie (and it sounds like they are), they should require at least 2 things in exchange (in addition to money for the property). (1) the city should require that the pedestrian route be maintained along the Prairie path. We should not allow another superblock to cut off pedestrian access to MinuteMaid. (2) They should require ground floor retail space, preferably on all sides of the project, but most definitely along the Prairie pedestrian path and along Crawford and Texas.

Edited by Houston19514
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Posted earlier today in the Ben Milam thread:

Good news/bad news:

Good: more residential in downtown. More Activity in the MinuteMaid Park neighborhood.

Bad: they are demolishing the old hotel and asking the city to abandon Prairie Street between Crawford and La Branch.

IF the city is prepared to abandon Prairie (and it sounds like they are), they should require at least 2 things in exchange (in addition to money for the property). (1) the city should require that the pedestrian route be maintained along the Prairie path. We should not allow another superblock to cut off pedestrian access to MinuteMaid. (2) They should require ground floor retail space, preferably on all sides of the project, but most definitely along the Prairie pedestrian path and along Crawford and Texas.

Couldn't agree more!

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Posted earlier today in the Ben Milam thread:

Bad: they are demolishing the old hotel and asking the city to abandon Prairie Street between Crawford and La Branch.

.

Not necessarily. There could be two separate structures connected by bridge, a la Galleria over Hildago or the apts by Dynamo stadium.

And in the end Prairie is cut off just a block further, so no biggie right?

Edit: Suppose I should read before commenting, if he is buying Prairie, then of course he will build on it!

Edited by ChrisPHous
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Not necessarily. There could be two separate structures connected by bridge, a la Galleria over Hildago or the apts by Dynamo stadium.

And in the end Prairie is cut off just a block further, so no biggie right?

What do you mean "Not necessarily". Did you read the article? It says they have asked the city to abandon Prairie Street. (When I first read that the apartments would cover two blocks, I presumed they would be connected by bridges, but then kept reading and saw they are asking to take over Prairie.)

And yes, cutting Prairie off a block further is a biggie. No more breaks in the pedestrian grid should be allowed, especially at this location.

Edited by Houston19514
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Let's get to work, guys. Here's the Mayor's and city councilors' email addresses:

mayor@houstontx.gov

districta@houstontx.gov

districtb@houstontx.gov

districtc@houstontx.gov

districtd@houstontx.gov

districte@houstontx.gov

districtf@houstontx.gov

districtg@houstontx.gov

districth@houstontx.gov

districti@houstontx.gov

districtj@houstontx.gov

districtk@houstontx.gov

atlarge1@houstontx.gov

atlarge2@houstontx.gov

atlarge3@houstontx.gov

atlarge4@houstontx.gov

atlarge5@houstontx.gov

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Let's get to work, guys. Here's the Mayor's and city councilors' email addresses:

mayor@houstontx.gov

districta@houstontx.gov

districtb@houstontx.gov

districtc@houstontx.gov

districtd@houstontx.gov

districte@houstontx.gov

districtf@houstontx.gov

districtg@houstontx.gov

districth@houstontx.gov

districti@houstontx.gov

districtj@houstontx.gov

districtk@houstontx.gov

atlarge1@houstontx.gov

atlarge2@houstontx.gov

atlarge3@houstontx.gov

atlarge4@houstontx.gov

atlarge5@houstontx.gov

You're kidding right? Those goons can barely compose a decent speech or announcment. Much less check their email. Much less actually respond. MUCH less care.

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You're kidding right? Those goons can barely compose a decent speech or announcment. Much less check their email. Much less actually respond. MUCH less care.

If you were able, or cared enough, to have ever composed an email to the mayor or a city councilor, you would know that is not true.

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To be fair, it's only cutting the block off one street earlier than it is already cut-off. It's not like this will do anything to motor traffic (It will slightly inconvenience some fans walking from their cars to the game). That said, I'm all in favor for requiring ground floor retail (although, I don't think it can support retail completely on three sides-- these are huge blocks; there is nothing like that in the City that I know of).

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Let's get to work, guys. Here's the Mayor's and city councilors' email addresses:

mayor@houstontx.gov

districta@houstontx.gov

districtb@houstontx.gov

districtc@houstontx.gov

districtd@houstontx.gov

districte@houstontx.gov

districtf@houstontx.gov

districtg@houstontx.gov

districth@houstontx.gov

districti@houstontx.gov

districtj@houstontx.gov

districtk@houstontx.gov

atlarge1@houstontx.gov

atlarge2@houstontx.gov

atlarge3@houstontx.gov

atlarge4@houstontx.gov

atlarge5@houstontx.gov

Done. Thank you, Houston19514!

I also wrote Marlene Gafrick, Director City Planning marlene.gafrick@houstontx.gov.

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To be fair, it's only cutting the block off one street earlier than it is already cut-off. It's not like this will do anything to motor traffic (It will slightly inconvenience some fans walking from their cars to the game). That said, I'm all in favor for requiring ground floor retail (although, I don't think it can support retail completely on three sides-- these are huge blocks; there is nothing like that in the City that I know of).

Vehicle traffic I am not nearly as concerned about. Closing it off to pedestrians, however, would be a very bad move.

No, these are not huge block. In fact, downtown Houston's blocks are fairly small. Imagine a setup like Post Midtown Square sitting across from MinuteMaid Park! (and the retail space that is filled in those blocks would more than fill up what I am proposing for this development).

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To be fair, it's only cutting the block off one street earlier than it is already cut-off. It's not like this will do anything to motor traffic (It will slightly inconvenience some fans walking from their cars to the game).

Of course it will do something to motor traffic: It will stop motor traffic from traveling or parking on that section of road. As to inconveniencing people, that's exactly the problem. I shouldn't have to walk around what was formerly a public road just so a developer can create his urban utopia. Eliminating public roads to create a public park that we all can use is one thing, but eliminating it for a private apartment complex is quite another.

Houston's downtown grid is easy to understand and navigate. Adding obstacles in the grid makes it less easy.

Edited by kylejack
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Why is everyone against this? I think it's a great development and easily worth one block of a street (which doesn't have much traffic on it anyway).

The development as is is in jepordy if the City is pressured to not sell the ROW to the developer.

Edited by mfastx
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Why is everyone against this? I think it's a great development and easily worth one block of a street (which doesn't have much traffic on it anyway).

Because I don't like screwing up a simple to navigate grid unless it is for something that's for the use of all/most of the public.

The development as is is in jepordy if the City is pressured to not sell the ROW to the developer.

According to who?

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Because I don't like screwing up a simple to navigate grid unless it is for something that's for the use of all/most of the public.

Well I don't really see it as "screwing it up." C'mon, man, it's just one block. Now, I would agree if they wanted multiple blocks and wanted to install curvy suburban streets and shit, yeah I can see why people would be against that. But every time I go to MMP I never see anyone using this street except to go to the parking lots on these blocks. It's not a used street and it dead ends right there at MMP anyway.

According to who?

According to the plans of the devleopment. Obviously they will have to change plans and downscale the development if they won't be able to secure the street.

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Well I don't really see it as "screwing it up." C'mon, man, it's just one block.

They are repurposing current public parking lots to be apartments. A bunch of parking spots there will therefore be lost, and we counter this with...removing more street parking as well?

According to the plans of the devleopment. Obviously they will have to change plans and downscale the development if they won't be able to secure the street.

You're saying if they can't do what they want to do that they'll have to do something different? Well...yeah!

Edited by kylejack
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Retail in this location at this time would be a total failure. It's not close to anything.

Not close to anything? Are you being sarcastic?

Directly across the street from a stadium that has 80+ game days per year

6 blocks from Dynamo Stadium, that will host many event days every year.

4 blocks from one of the largest convention centers in the country

across the street from a hotel

underneath 324 apartments

close to several light rail stops

3 blocks from a likely new convention center hotel

According to the plans of the devleopment. Obviously they will have to change plans and downscale the development if they won't be able to secure the street.

They haven't even hired an architect yet. Their plans are hardly set in stone. And it does not in any way necessarily require downscaling the development. They could do bridges acorss Prairie, including possibly buildling apartments briding across the street. They could also add a floor or two to make up any lost scale.

Of course there is always the (not unreasonable) hope that the Chronicle just got the story wrong and they are merely seeking the right to put a bridge across Prairie, not to close it altogether.

Edited by Houston19514
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Not close to anything? Are you being sarcastic?

Directly across the street from a stadium that has 80+ game days per year

6 blocks from Dynamo Stadium, that will host many event days every year.

4 blocks from one of the largest convention centers in the country.

across the street from a hotel.

underneath 324 apartments.

and a few blocks from another stadium, and a few short blocks from a major convention center, etc., etc.

close to several light rail stops

3 blocks from a likely new convention center hotel

If they include retail, they could probably get away with one or two spaces. And the only reason I say that is because of light rail potential and maybe Minute Maid. I mean, Minute Maid helped produce like what, two bars? Besides that, what else is even remotely close besides Vic & Anthony's?

I honestly do not think any convention goers will go that way for retail, at least not enough to help sustain it. All the synergy is to the west.

Putting retail on the entire first floor would mean mostly empty spaces for a very long time.

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Well I don't really see it as "screwing it up." C'mon, man, it's just one block. Now, I would agree if they wanted multiple blocks and wanted to install curvy suburban streets and shit, yeah I can see why people would be against that. But every time I go to MMP I never see anyone using this street except to go to the parking lots on these blocks. It's not a used street and it dead ends right there at MMP anyway.

We're trying to make a pedestrian friendly downtown here. Prairie (along with Preston) leads directly from the ballpark to the MetroRail Preston station. Requiring a one-block detour (which adds 2 blocks to your walk) is not the way to build a pedestrian friendly downtown (and is not the way to help retail businesses, if they are included, to succeed.)

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If they include retail, they could probably get away with one or two spaces. And the only reason I say that is because of light rail potential and maybe Minute Maid. I mean, Minute Maid helped produce like what, two bars? Besides that, what else is even remotely close besides Vic & Anthony's?

I honestly do not think any convention goers will go that way for retail, at least not enough to help sustain it. All the synergy is to the west.

Putting retail on the entire first floor would mean mostly empty spaces for a very long time.

Retailers of the sort we are talking about here generally don't build structures for themselves. They lease from developers. For whatever reason (probabaly largely property costs), no developer has built any space for retailers to try there. Landry's built Vic & Anthony's. The two bars and the hotel filled the only habitable buildings that pre-existed MinuteMaid. The two bars, hotel, and Vic & Anthony's have all apparently been at least somewhat successful, so I would imagine there would be leasing interest from other retailers (and I'm talking here about bars and restaurants).

Look at what was close to Post Midtown Square before it was built. Nothing. And yet, retail has been very successful there. I cannot imagine why a similar setup could not be even more successful in this location. The absence of retail in a particular block is not proof (or really even evidence) that retail cannot be successful there.

Convention goers don't currently go that way for retail (except the retail that is there, Vic & Anthony's) because there is no other retail there. Of course the "synergy" is currently to the west. That's where the only retail is. If there is retail three or 4 blocks from the north end of the convention center, some of the "synergy" will shift to the north. This will be even more true if/when the new convention center hotel is built (which could be completed shortly after the apartments are built.)

Edited by Houston19514
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Touche. Retailers do not generally build structures for themselves, especially downtown.

Trust me, I love retail as much as anyone, I'm just cynical. Finger will be pioneering the area if he includes it. I'd expect someone to have to be less brave when the next project in that area goes up.

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Touche. Retailers do not generally build structures for themselves, especially downtown.

Trust me, I love retail as much as anyone, I'm just cynical. Finger will be pioneering the area if he includes it. I'd expect someone to have to be less brave when the next project in that area goes up.

Personally, I think it takes zero bravery. Just a minimal amount of vision.

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Before we go too far off the deep end, it should be noted that Prairie is a one way street heading west. As Minute Maid Park blocks Prairie from the east, this is already not a through street, and its closing would not significantly hurt traffic flow. The only traffic that would be hindered is that traffic heading north on Crawford that wishes to turn left onto Prairie. As Crawford itself is not a thoroughfare (it is blocked by Discovery Green), there is very little traffic on Crawford, either. So, in turns of hindering traffic, closing Prairie at that block won't impact much at all.

As for pedestrian traffic, there is a bit more to think about. One of the entrances to Minute Maid Park sits at the corner of Crawford and Prairie. There are two parking lots directly behind this proposed project, and a parking garage another block west. These lots tend to funnel baseball patrons down Prairie toward the left field entrance. Blocking the street to pedestrians would cause some inconvenience to some patrons, though even this is a bit overblown, as no one would have to detour more than 250 feet, the length of one block. The entrance at Prairie leads to the Crawford Boxes and center field, which has no seating. Patrons would be detoured either to Texas or Preston entrances, which are directly next to the majority of the stadium seating, as well as ramps to the upper decks.

Given that Finger put retail in the ground floor of One Park Place, it probably wouldn't take much to convince him to put some here. I don't know that all four sides is worth it, but Crawford and Texas would likely sprout a few bars or restaurants. I would like to see a pedestrian breezeway and a little retail in return for giving up a street, but if all we got was some retail, I think the loss of pedestrian passage is tolerable.

By the way, Preston is the street that leads directly to the Red Line's Preston Station, not Prairie.

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They are repurposing current public parking lots to be apartments. A bunch of parking spots there will therefore be lost, and we counter this with...removing more street parking as well?

Are you seriously complaining about parking lots/parking spots being lost? Alright suit yourself, if you'd rather have parking lots, then fine. I can't argue with that.

Again, the street is only one freaking block. You think that's gonna make a difference? There is plenty of parking in downtown Houston, lol.

You're saying if they can't do what they want to do that they'll have to do something different? Well...yeah!

I'm saying that the development might not be as good if they have to split it up on two blocks.

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We're trying to make a pedestrian friendly downtown here. Prairie (along with Preston) leads directly from the ballpark to the MetroRail Preston station. Requiring a one-block detour (which adds 2 blocks to your walk) is not the way to build a pedestrian friendly downtown (and is not the way to help retail businesses, if they are included, to succeed.)

First of all, parking lots and replacing them with apartments with retail is 100% better for pedestrians than what is currently there. And no it doesn't.

Also, another rail station will be closer to the south. I can't believe people seriously think that closing one street for one block will have serious impacts of any kind. It's not like people walk on that street every day. There's literally nothing there but the ballpark. So basically you're saying that this apartment complex with retail shouldn't be built because it might be an inconvenience to a small percentage of pedestrians going to "Lastros" games during summer months??

You have got to be kidding me.

Edited by mfastx
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How does it compare to putting retail into Post Midtown?

Really doesn't compare at all. Post Midtown is in the middle of a huge residential area, upwards of 25,000 residents. This proposed project is the only residential component within 4 blocks in any direction. Even the daytime lunch crowd is several blocks away. This is not a retail goldmine by any measure. It will only have 85 to 90 days of baseball crowds, with the possibility of another 20 days of soccer crowds, if they choose to park on this side of 59.

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Pushing for ground floor retail in this location is not a good idea at all. Downtown desperately needs residential development and you have a very credible developer that is going to provide that. Success with this project will encourage further residential development. It's questionable at best that this area could support retail of any kind at this point. Downtown has enough failed retail without encouraging more.

How about letting the developer assess the demand for the amount of retail that the project can support and allowing them to build accordingly?

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What Redscare and livincinco said.

There will be future projects that will benefit from retail, its just too early for this one.

It would be cool if he did something like Milhaus proposes to do in midtown. Don't their plans call for residential on the first floor but allow for commercial in the future, or something like that?

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I don't like the idea of closing that block of Prairie, but I can live with it as the street dead-ends on Crawford now. In general though Houston should keep the downtown grid - it's very effective in moving traffic. Retail in that location for now is a non-starter. Overall I'm pretty pleased by the proposal, even though it could turn out as one of those faux-Mediterranean stucco things. This is much better than Ballpark Place, the highrise that had been proposed for the same block.

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Really doesn't compare at all. Post Midtown is in the middle of a huge residential area, upwards of 25,000 residents. This proposed project is the only residential component within 4 blocks in any direction. Even the daytime lunch crowd is several blocks away. This is not a retail goldmine by any measure. It will only have 85 to 90 days of baseball crowds, with the possibility of another 20 days of soccer crowds, if they choose to park on this side of 59.

Plus at least 5 days of college football, plus many days of other events at BBVA Compass Stadium, plus many days of events at the GRB, plus people who stay at Inn @ the Ballpark, plus people who come to the Stadium for tours on non-game days, plus the crowds staying at the fairly likely new convention center hotel. . . Why is everyone ignoring the fact that the little bit of retail that has opened in the area has stayed open (i.e., apparently been at least somewhat successful), with the single exception of that Bell restaurant?

Also, wasn't Post Midtown one of the earlier complexes built in the Midtown rehab (i.e., I don't think there were anywhere near 25,000 residents surrounding it when it was built with retail on the ground floor).

Edited by Houston19514
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Why is everyone ignoring the fact that the little bit of retail that has opened in the area has stayed open (i.e., apparently been at least somewhat successful), with the single exception of that Bell restaurant?

Well, I personally ignore it because I officed literally one block from this location for 5 years, and watched the numerous attempts of bars and restaurants try and fail in the area. Only the B.U.S. and the other restaurant have made it. The Bells & Whistles was a spectacular failure, the numerous restaurants that attempted to make a go of it at Crawford and Commerce failed, the place at Preston and Labranch failed. Even when the Ballpark opened its restaurants for lunch, it failed. Everthing over there has failed. The courthouse lunch crowd is not enough, and there is not any residential nearby to provide the regular clientele that these places need to survive.

That said, the 380 units in this project, plus the 340 in One Park Place, plus the 300 or so at Lofts at the Ballpark might provide enough nearby residential to complement the crowds on gamedays. But, it is nowhere near a sure thing. And, surely not on all four sides of the building.

Edited by RedScare
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Well, I personally ignore it because I officed literally one block from this location for 5 years, and watched the numerous attempts of bars and restaurants try and fail in the area. Only the B.U.S. and the other restaurant have made it. The Bells & Whistles was a spectacular failure, the numerous restaurants that attempted to make a go of it at Crawford and Commerce failed, the place at Preston and Labranch failed. Even when the Ballpark opened its restaurants for lunch, it failed. Everthing over there has failed. The courthouse lunch crowd is not enough, and there is not any residential nearby to provide the regular clientele that these places need to survive.

That said, the 380 units in this project, plus the 340 in One Park Place, plus the 300 or so at Lofts at the Ballpark might provide enough nearby residential to complement the crowds on gamedays. But, it is nowhere near a sure thing. And, surely not on all four sides of the building.

Dude, by your own account, everything has NOT failed. And the closer you get to the actual site we are discussing, the higher the success rate has been. B.U.S., Home Plate Bar & Grille, Vic & Anthony's... all successful (at least to the extent they are still open). Crawford and Commerce? Then let's throw in Texas at Austin, where I believe Irma's Southwest Grille is still open. The neighborhood really has a pretty good track record going, considering we are talking about an industry with a VERY low survival rate.

Agreed all 4 sides of the buildings is probably not practical. (They also have to have room for parking garage entrance ramps, loading docks, etc.) I envision retail on 3 side of the south building (Texas, Crawford and Prairie) and two sides of the north building (Crawford and Prairie). Hopefully also building it so that a third side of the north building could also be converted to retail at a later date.

Edited by Houston19514
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Plus at least 5 days of college football, plus many days of other events at BBVA Compass Stadium, plus many days of events at the GRB, plus people who stay at Inn @ the Ballpark, plus people who come to the Stadium for tours on non-game days, plus the crowds staying at the fairly likely new convention center hotel. . . Why is everyone ignoring the fact that the little bit of retail that has opened in the area has stayed open (i.e., apparently been at least somewhat successful), with the single exception of that Bell restaurant?

Also, wasn't Post Midtown one of the earlier complexes built in the Midtown rehab (i.e., I don't think there were anywhere near 25,000 residents surrounding it when it was built with retail on the ground floor).

Could retail survive in that location? Maybe. The difference is that you are talking about requiring the developer to include retail (on all sides) even if he feels it's not appropriate. That's where we're disagreeing.

I wouldnt be surprised if the finished plan has some retail facing the ballpark (we haven't seen the plans yet, remember?), but this is a big win for the area and downtown in general even if it doesn't.

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Whatever you say. I've got an idea. Rather than trying to convince a guy who has actually owned a restaurant downtown about how easy it is to make a killing by the Ballpark, why don't you bust out with your half a million and call Marvy to pre-lease a space. You'll make a killing, and we can have HAIF happy hours there (assuming we could find a seat).

You can talk out of your arse and perhaps convince a couple of the high schoolers on here that retail will be a piece of cake at this location, but those of us who have actually spent our money doing it aren't buying. I doubt you have any experience in this area whatsoever to talk so big. Do you even live in Houston?

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Whatever you say. I've got an idea. Rather than trying to convince a guy who has actually owned a restaurant downtown about how easy it is to make a killing by the Ballpark, why don't you bust out with your half a million and call Marvy to pre-lease a space. You'll make a killing, and we can have HAIF happy hours there (assuming we could find a seat).

You can talk out of your arse and perhaps convince a couple of the high schoolers on here that retail will be a piece of cake at this location, but those of us who have actually spent our money doing it aren't buying. I doubt you have any experience in this area whatsoever to talk so big. Do you even live in Houston?

Oh, you do love your strawmen, don't you?

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Could retail survive in that location? Maybe. The difference is that you are talking about requiring the developer to include retail (on all sides) even if he feels it's not appropriate. That's where we're disagreeing.

I wouldnt be surprised if the finished plan has some retail facing the ballpark (we haven't seen the plans yet, remember?), but this is a big win for the area and downtown in general even if it doesn't.

I'm not sure where the idea came from that I would require retail on all four sides. The most important are (1) Crawford and (2) Texas. Hopefully also Prairie. Make provisions for future retail on Preston.

I know we haven't seen the plans yet. Hopefully, Finger is already contemplating retail on all four sides and the roof (j/k although, it could be a fun idea, being across from the ballpark. . . ). This whole conversation started with my suggesting that if Finger wants the city to abandon Prairie, it gives the City the opportunity to make sure this development contributes as much as possible to the desired urban fabric of downtown Houston (i.e., keep a pedestrian path along Prairie and have as much ground level retail as possible).

Personally, I would not even count this as a big win for downtown if it does not include retail at least on Crawford. I would count it as overall perhpaps a slight plus for downtown, but a huge lost opportunity.

The reasons people on this board are throwing up to show that retail can't be successful on this site would apply just as well to the idea of putting apartments on this site. And yet, here comes Marvy Finger, building apartments on this site that is "close to nothing".

Edited by Houston19514
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Posted earlier today in the Ben Milam thread:

Good news/bad news:

Good: more residential in downtown. More Activity in the MinuteMaid Park neighborhood.

Bad: they are demolishing the old hotel and asking the city to abandon Prairie Street between Crawford and La Branch.

IF the city is prepared to abandon Prairie (and it sounds like they are), they should require at least 2 things in exchange (in addition to money for the property). (1) the city should require that the pedestrian route be maintained along the Prairie path. We should not allow another superblock to cut off pedestrian access to MinuteMaid. (2) They should require ground floor retail space, preferably on all sides of the project, but most definitely along the Prairie pedestrian path and along Crawford and Texas.

The idea that you would require ground floor retail on all sides of the project came from here, lol.

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Why is everyone ignoring the fact that the little bit of retail that has opened in the area has stayed open (i.e., apparently been at least somewhat successful), with the single exception of that Bell restaurant?

Because it isn't so. Picazo failed at LaBranch and Preston. More importantly, though, is that there isn't a lot that is working around here restaurant-wise, aside from V&A and Irma's.

Let them decide on their own if they want to offer retail, but let's keep our public right of way.

Edited by kylejack
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  • The title was changed to 500 Crawford Apartments

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