Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Replies 996
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Went yesterday and it was amazing.  Very well done. The architecture, the exhibits, everything.  Here are some photos:            

A couple of pics of the ceiling in the main atrium, taken from the third floor. As you can see, there’s tons of natural light augmented with some artificial light. I can’t wait to see this building on

Posted Images

 

 

October 2020 is pretty far out, and a little disappointing to be honest. Its been fairly dry the last couple of months, so I thought they would be flying through that building. I assume that they are doing all of the landscaping and gardens for the museum too because there's no way just that building alone needs 1 year and a month to be completed.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, X.R. said:

 

 

October 2020 is pretty far out, and a little disappointing to be honest. Its been fairly dry the last couple of months, so I thought they would be flying through that building. I assume that they are doing all of the landscaping and gardens for the museum too because there's no way just that building alone needs 1 year and a month to be completed.

 

The finishes on a building like this take a long time because they have to be perfect. That's why homes and apartments have textured walls and ceilings to cover up shoddy craftsmanship where as a building like this would not be okay with that. Plus I drove by last night and yeah I can totally see why I will be over a year to completion. The interior is still just exposed beams.  

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, jmitch94 said:

 

The finishes on a building like this take a long time because they have to be perfect. That's why homes and apartments have textured walls and ceilings to cover up shoddy craftsmanship where as a building like this would not be okay with that. Plus I drove by last night and yeah I can totally see why I will be over a year to completion. The interior is still just exposed beams.  

 

Wait are we talking about the museum or the garage at Lyric?

 

If you mean the Museum...yeah its going to take a long time. One, its Steven Holl. Two, its a museum. Three, its going to be the crown jewel for this district. They can take as long as they need to get it right.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

Wait are we talking about the museum or the garage at Lyric?

 

If you mean the Museum...yeah its going to take a long time. One, its Steven Holl. Two, its a museum. Three, its going to be the crown jewel for this district. They can take as long as they need to get it right.

 

I'm referring to the building that this thread is dedicated to. You are absolutely right, this needs to be done right and will be one of Houston's signature buildings. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, X.R. said:

 

 

October 2020 is pretty far out, and a little disappointing to be honest. Its been fairly dry the last couple of months, so I thought they would be flying through that building. I assume that they are doing all of the landscaping and gardens for the museum too because there's no way just that building alone needs 1 year and a month to be completed.

 

Also, if they are just giving it to MFAH in October 2020, it will probably be a few more months before the museum is open. We're probably looking at 2021.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Also, if they are just giving it to MFAH in October 2020, it will probably be a few more months before the museum is open. We're probably looking at 2021.

 

That is exactly what the worker told me, they turn it over but the museum has to do their part before it will open. I asked if he knew the opening date and was told, no. Why rush perfection.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Rajnar Jartansson's The Visitor, is going away after this weekend and I highly recommend it if you like music and video. Its a beautifully presented work that you should take the time to see.

If you do like music, the director of the Glassel school and well known sculptor Joseph Havel, along with sculptor Steve Murphy, and I, Tin Night, will be performing in the arts district this Friday night at the Patio at the Pit Room from 8:00-11:00.. I hope that some of you will come out and hear our unique sound, and get there early and enjoy some of the incredible barbecue.

Hope to see some of you.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, bobruss said:

Rajnar Jartansson's The Visitor, is going away after this weekend and I highly recommend it if you like music and video. Its a beautifully presented work that you should take the time to see.

If you do like music, the director of the Glassel school and well known sculptor Joseph Havel, along with sculptor Steve Murphy, and I, Tin Night, will be performing in the arts district this Friday night at the Patio at the Pit Room from 8:00-11:00.. I hope that some of you will come out and hear our unique sound, and get there early and enjoy some of the incredible barbecue.

Hope to see some of you.

 

Sounds cool! Anywhere I can hear yalls music online?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the opportunity to meet hindesky last night at The Patio.  I now have had the opportunity to have face to face visits with both he and ekdrm2d1.

Two of our more prolific photo journalist. Thanks for coming by to hear us last night.

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
2 hours ago, slcowart416 said:

Are these panels made of glass or plastic?  I'm concerned that if they are plastic / resin type material, they will "yellow" over time and thus become ugly.

A McCarthy worker told me they were glass, my concern would be vandals.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/entertainment/arts-theater/article/when-does-the-new-mfah-kinder-building-open-14814071.php#photo-18567502

 

Forklifts beep non-stop, power tools whir, generators hum and hammers pound inside the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston’s newest building-to-be, echoing through the concrete walls with a sense of urgency.



 

There’s no time to waste. Museum director Gary Tinterow announced Wednesday that the Nancy and Rich Kinder Building will open to the public next fall.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the museum sent an email yesterday:

 

JUST ANNOUNCED

The Susan and Fayez S. Sarofim Campus will be completed in fall 2020 with the opening of the Nancy and Rich Kinder Building

Gary Tinterow, Director and Margaret Alkek Williams Chair, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, today announced that the institution’s multi-year project to expand and redevelop its Susan and Fayez S. Sarofim Campus will be completed in fall 2020 with the opening of the Nancy and Rich Kinder Building.

With more than 100,000 square feet of space, or 56 percent, dedicated to the presentation of works of art, the Kinder Building increases overall MFAH exhibition space by nearly 75 percent. 

A series of major site-specific commissioned artworks will be inaugurated with the Kinder Building, serving as portals that connect this new structure with the other components of the campus. Commissioned artists are El Anatsui, Byung Hoon Choi, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Olafur Eliasson, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Cristina Iglesias, and Ai Weiwei.
  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

I drive by this, and the Ion building, every day. Both have hit the overdrive button on working, 15+ people on site every morning doing various things when previously you would go a few days with very minimal movement on the site. The glass tube wrapping seems to now only have one large side and one tiny side left, when like in early September they had only done one side.

 

Probably good for the construction guys and gals, Christmas is coming and overtime sounds pretty good right now.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Avossos said:

is this building... brutalist?

 

😲

I  don’t think the Kinder building is brutalist.  Whatever the style, though, I have to say that the overall aesthetic falls flat for me.  The tubes on the outside are not very striking (hopefully they’ll be lit well at night — the evening photos above offer SOME hope) and the most interesting lines are the curved contours on the roof, which you can’t see.  🤷🏻‍♂️  I think the new Denver Art Museum is a lot more bold.
 

IMHO the Glassell topples the Kinder Building aesthetically.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Avossos said:

is this building... brutalist?

 

😲

 

I would say the glass-tube façade (covering most of the raw concrete) would rule out brutalism. Maybe deconstructivist, at least in the massing and roof line.

 

I hope I'm wrong, but I fear this building won't age well. There's still a lot of exposed raw concrete in the nooks and crannies, and these surfaces tend to stain and streak over time. It will also take a lot of maintenance to keep the backlit façade looking new.

 

 

3 hours ago, MarathonMan said:

I  don’t think the Kinder building is brutalist.  Whatever the style, though, I have to say that the overall aesthetic falls flat for me.  The tubes on the outside are not very striking (hopefully they’ll be lit well at night — the evening photos above offer SOME hope) and the most interesting lines are the curved contours on the roof, which you can’t see.  🤷🏻‍♂️  

 

It's another example of a building designed to be striking as a model or rendering (or as viewed from a passing helicopter, I guess). This is not uncommon when the main function of the design is to convince potential donors to build it. How the building will actually be perceived by visitors and passers-by is a secondary concern at best, and entirely irrelevant if the thing never gets built.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Angostura said:

 

I would say the glass-tube façade (covering most of the raw concrete) would rule out brutalism. Maybe deconstructivist, at least in the massing and roof line.

 

I hope I'm wrong, but I fear this building won't age well. There's still a lot of exposed raw concrete in the nooks and crannies, and these surfaces tend to stain and streak over time. It will also take a lot of maintenance to keep the backlit façade looking new.

 

 

 

It's another example of a building designed to be striking as a model or rendering (or as viewed from a passing helicopter, I guess). This is not uncommon when the main function of the design is to convince potential donors to build it. How the building will actually be perceived by visitors and passers-by is a secondary concern at best, and entirely irrelevant if the thing never gets built.

 

In general it would fall under the label of Post-Modernism, of which Steven Holl was most influenced by, and looking at other Steven Holl works, he has normally approached architecture from a deconstructionist angle. You are most likely right, I'm simply buttressing your argument with what Steven Holl has been historically, and how he has approached architecture historically.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Angostura said:

How the building will actually be perceived by visitors and passers-by is a secondary concern at best, and entirely irrelevant if the thing never gets built.

 

 

It was designed to have as much natural light coming in from the ceiling to make the inside bright and airy. How the building is perceived by visitors was very much a concern. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Angostura said:

It's another example of a building designed to be striking as a model or rendering (or as viewed from a passing helicopter, I guess). This is not uncommon when the main function of the design is to convince potential donors to build it. How the building will actually be perceived by visitors and passers-by is a secondary concern at best, and entirely irrelevant if the thing never gets built.

 

2 hours ago, jmitch94 said:

It was designed to have as much natural light coming in from the ceiling to make the inside bright and airy. How the building is perceived by visitors was very much a concern. 

 

 

jmitch, you are correct.  Likewise, how the building will be perceived by passers-by was very much a primary concern.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Houston19514 said:

 

 

 

jmitch, you are correct.  Likewise, how the building will be perceived by passers-by was very much a primary concern.

 

 

Yes, yes, I'm sure they thought about it. But all the press materials show the building as viewed by someone passing by 200 feet in the air.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Angostura said:

 

 

Yes, yes, I'm sure they thought about it. But all the press materials show the building as viewed by someone passing by 200 feet in the air.

 

Even if true, that hardly demonstrates that little or no thought was given to how the building will be perceived by visitors or passers-by.  Sorry, but your initial claim was just false.

Edited by Houston19514
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually don't see a lot of renderings viewed from above, unless from the top of the Glassell School and that is from a viewers perspective.  Sure there are photos of models...but that is how people generally take photos of a models.  There are also some drone photos of the construction site, but they tell a construction story, not a portrayal experience.  

 

Do a simple google search " MFAH Kinder Rendering " and it is almost all from a grounded viewer's perspective. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=mfah+kinder+renderings&sxsrf=ACYBGNRlIkw2f9PSXkGNwTq-vZfnMeKhSw:1573249113475&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjE27TUydvlAhVJCKwKHZQYARkQ_AUIESgB&biw=1781&bih=879

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I walked around the building today.  It is coming together beautifully.  I love the effect the project is having on the sculpture garden and contrary to the hasty (mis)judgments rendered above and elsewhere on HAIF, the interaction with passers-by was clearly very high on the priority list for this design.  The public-facing sides (Montrose, Main and Binz) are probably at least 75% glass with, wide, sheltering overhangs.  Looking very inviting.

Edited by Houston19514
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Houston19514 said:

I walked around the building today.  It is coming together beautifully.  I love the effect the project is having on the sculpture garden and contrary to the hasty (mis)judgments rendered above and elsewhere on HAIF, the interaction with passers-by was clearly very high on the priority list for this design.  The public-facing sides (Montrose, Main and Binz) are probably at least 75% glass with, wide, sheltering overhangs.  Looking very inviting.

 

lol, that comment seems to have really gotten to you! Keep it in its own thread... and grow a thicker skin. Not everyone will have the same aesthetic judgment.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...