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Vintage Park Shopping Village Developments


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We have 3 threads talking about the same thing.

I don't care if Ruth Chris's Steakhouse is a new restaurant to be listed on the project, or if you have a tenant list, they don't need a brand new thread to discuss it.

They all relate to the original topic. We don't need to maitain 3 threads.

How much more can you talk about Ruth Chris's Steakhouse being a tenant anyways, sounds more like a statement and it is done. :huh:

I requested a merge. -_-

Edited by Pumapayam
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The first suburban El Tiempo Cantina restaurant is coming to Vintage Park, opening in March.

They seem to really be expanding. I saw on a new development list on the College Station website that said one is going to built there. Pretty damn good tacos.

Objectively the best tacos in Texas*

Willowbrook is losing businesses left and right. CompUSA, of all places, is leaving both that area and I-45/1960 ( I have NO idea considering its only competition is BestBuy; in the era of technology, there's no bigger need). The Gessner area of Willowbrook is also getting more and more vacant.

The closure of a CompUSA store, of all places, is no indication of an area's retail health. CompUSA is a very unhealthy company and is closing almost 1/2 of their stores, nationwide.

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People will go there, but it won't be anything special. Most people will be able to see it for what it is: a faux-European shopping plaza with upscale stores and professional businesses. People will shop there the way they shop at other strip malls around the suburbs. This isn't really something you can get excited about (other than having some shopping in proximity to home), because it has no community identity. It's not something that anyone will take pride in. It's merely a regional shopping center for the upper middle class in the great northwest. As much as some of you would like to see all the commercial activity move further north while Willowbrook turns into a Greenspoint, this will not happen. People are still drawn to 1960 and the Willowbrook area, and this will remain the center of activity and night life. So, as I stated, people will go to the Vintage and spend money, and on the weekends, I'm sure it will draw large numbers of people, but it will never be a popular center of activity, since it's way out in suburbia and doesn't have the city-feel of Willowbrook, which is technically in Houston. The one thing that will be a hit with me (and many others) is the HEB store. I've been waiting so long for one of these close to my house, ever since they closed the HEB Pantry Foods literally right in my neighborhood entrance. I either had to go to Spring Branch or Klein to shop at HEB, so I was left shopping at Kroger, which I hate. What they should have done was to build only a huge HEB store, leaving all of the natural tree canopy. They could have called it Cypress Creek Market or Great Northwest Market and designed the store similar to the modern look of the HP area. This would have been classy, practical, welcome, and at the expense of a lot less trees.

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I like the trees too. Luckily they're keeping a few.

As for parking. Where do you recommend we put our cars? The local rickshaw service is a bit spotty, so I'm pretty sure I'd have to drive and park on the surface, just like I do when I go to Market Street and just about 99% of the other places that offer goods & services.

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The closure of a CompUSA store, of all places, is no indication of an area's retail health. CompUSA is a very unhealthy company and is closing almost 1/2 of their stores, nationwide.

They closed the one off of Southwest Freeway and Highway 6 as well recently.

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Puma, thanks!

This is getting old to talk about.

FYI to PA - the shopping center around AMC24 has a relatively high vacancy rate without much recent refreshing of the tenant base. For ex, the section where Expo, Mikasa et al were located is still vacant. Additionally, there are gaps all over. IMHO, this is because the demographics are not as strong in the IMMEDIATE (1, 3 mile radius) area. That means there is not much to stroll around to see other than stores (and loud teenagers) immediately near the theater. This will eventually get better though. Still this shopping center will never encourage those to walk the whole place due to the large parking lots in the middle of the center and, also, the teenagers (part of the demos) is a turn-off to high-end shoppers, me thinks.

Yet, if you drive north 3 or 4 miles, the demographics are much better due to the new housing developments and the fact that your market radius drops the lower economic neighborhoods to the south (and vacant land) for higher value to the north.

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One other thing on the trees destroyed at VP.

I believe everyone here wishes the trees were better protected and saved.

Yet, if you are familiar with the topography of the location, there is a clear sloping toward the gully to the east and this area was originally called "The Bottoms" when the settlers came in. I would assume that this original name was related to the area being flood-prone by Cypress Creek.

Hence, the reality is ANY development would have necessitated releveling of the property to some extent. Perhaps a more complex and expensive pumping system could have solved the problem and kept more trees, but I don't know the numbers on that.

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Agree 100%

Having a bit of "Dubrovnik" across from "Silicon Valley" is design in a vaccum. Makes no sense.

It's like having a palm tree in front of your metal townhome in a forest of oaks.

This is why I could never live out in the nw suburbs after I get out on my own. Too much crass development in recent years. At least inside the loop, developers and residents have more aesthetic sensibility, so that if something gaudy pops up, you at least have a lot of people who live nearby complaining about it.

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Puma, thanks!

This is getting old to talk about.

FYI to PA - the shopping center around AMC24 has a relatively high vacancy rate without much recent refreshing of the tenant base. For ex, the section where Expo, Mikasa et al were located is still vacant. Additionally, there are gaps all over. IMHO, this is because the demographics are not as strong in the IMMEDIATE (1, 3 mile radius) area. That means there is not much to stroll around to see other than stores (and loud teenagers) immediately near the theater. This will eventually get better though. Still this shopping center will never encourage those to walk the whole place due to the large parking lots in the middle of the center and, also, the teenagers (part of the demos) is a turn-off to high-end shoppers, me thinks.

Yet, if you drive north 3 or 4 miles, the demographics are much better due to the new housing developments and the fact that your market radius drops the lower economic neighborhoods to the south (and vacant land) for higher value to the north.

I kind of like the demographics of the Willowbrook area. It has a lot of young adults, yuppies, working class, middle-middle class, and lower income people. I like how it is mixed, like you'd find in the city. I like being in a commercial area where I don't feel like I'm surrounded by snobby, crassy consumers.

The AMC24 plaza is very nice in design, planning, and landscaping. I'd give it a blue ribbon award if I could. As I said before, it is a good hybrid of suburban strip mall and town center concept. Once you park and start walking toward the theater, it has a pleasantness feel and look. I see lots of people who go there for a particular reason, but end up strolling around and just enjoying themselves. The courtyard in front of the theater is a nice place to relax. The whole shopping center just has a cozy feel that is missing from most others around the Houston area. I could do without the massive congregating of teenagers on Friday and Saturday nights though. They're so annoying, and they make it difficult for the civilized teenagers and young adults to enjoy their outings or dates.

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I kind of like the demographics of the Willowbrook area. It has a lot of young adults, yuppies, working class, middle-middle class, and lower income people. I like how it is mixed, like you'd find in the city. I like being in a commercial area where I don't feel like I'm surrounded by snobby, crassy consumers.

I can respect that, as I'm also not a big fan of mono-cultural or ubiquitously-high-income neighborhoods and venues, but retailers are much more discriminating. The architectural design of a shopping center is so far down the list as to almost be a non-issue.

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The architectural design of a shopping center is so far down the list as to almost be a non-issue.

This is correct. Most people don't pay much attention to the architecture of a shopping center after seeing it for the first time. Even if people absolutely hate the architecture, they will still shop there if they like the stores or want something from one of the stores.

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Speaking of that land across from Willowbrook that Auteur is talking about. Johnny Carson originally bought that land back in the 1980's. I'm not sure if he or his estate sold it prior to development or if they still own it, but I recall all the hubub about Johnny Carson owning that land (across from "Spoons") back in the glorious 80's.

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, HP and the Pappas family are opening a joint venture at this super secret location where they are going to give away electronics, computers and food for FREE. All you have to do is forward this post to 10 friends to find out where the secret location is.

:blink:

Pappas giving out FREE food??? That'll be the day.

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Speaking of that land across from Willowbrook that Auteur is talking about. Johnny Carson originally bought that land back in the 1980's. I'm not sure if he or his estate sold it prior to development or if they still own it, but I recall all the hubub about Johnny Carson owning that land (across from "Spoons") back in the glorious 80's.

Want to know something even more interesting (and my details are a bit imprecise here)? The Prince of Peace Catholic Church owned this land that you are speaking of all the way up to FM 1960 until selling it to Carson. This is information that I learned from parish management a few years back. They received it as a donation from one of the original families in the area (again this is from memory). It's too bad that they were unable to hold on to it longer to really earn some $$$. Yet, the Archdiocese did pretty well at the time.

PA - I still don't see the romantic description of the AMC 24 shopping center. I have never seen anyone 'strolling around' the plaza for the heck of it. Where would one stroll from and to?

Nonetheless, I would love to visit whichever shopping center that you did describe because I haven't seen what you describe. :lol:

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When I mentioned faster developments...

I grew up near Hillcroft and Beltway 8 which is now the intersection of the FB Toll Road and 2 miles up home of the Hwy 90 expressway that will go all the past Sugar Land with no stop lights

we've had buying power for years but for one reason or another businesses never developed the area once the 80s dried up as older businessed died for one reason or another

but with the south half of Highway 6 developing with no real merchants except for Walgreens, etc. and the longetivity of the neighborhoods in the area along with the the FB Toll Road's access to Main and Downtown...retailers have begun to take notice..

I go to the parents house one day in 2006 and at the corner of BW8 and Hillcroft is a Home Depot sign with strip centers and restaurants coming soon.....it's 2007 and the Home Depot has arrived, NTB opened, Washington Mutual and several other national restautant chains such as Chili's which was damn near unheard of at the time in my area

New Quest has the land across the street and will most likely run the gas station off and develop that big parcel also...

------------------------------

when I lived off 249 and 1960..I liked the HEB but was mad when they snatched it away and the only option was Tomball's which was too crowded when they finally renovated it. The HEB Urban Concept plan was a disaster as none of the stores in urban areas modeled after Gulfgate came to fruition because Acres Homes was planned for one and I was going to shop there...

At least its finally coming back...but as for the other stuff...typical cookie cutter stuff....unless your area never had much it's not going to be the big draw they think

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i think the reason y vintage park is getting a lot of hype is due to the developer's rep. borlingi who is doing vintage has also done uptown park phase 1&2, montebello, granduca, etc.. high end stuff.

in the beginning there was speculation that the now heb was going to be a central market, this can still be a possibility. if heb does well there is talk that it will be converted to central market just depends on money..profit. a friend of mine works at the firm that works on this project and there are def. mixed feelings on the project. but he says most, like 85% feel it's ugly, lol but i think the style of this center will attract people and would probably be a hit. i mean anything new is typically a hit....

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I'm excited about the project. A suggestion for the developers regarding landscaping. Rather than cheezy palm trees, they ought to plant Cypress trees. Cypress trees are found in the Mediterranean and it would blend in better.

Edited by mrfootball
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I'm excited about the project. A suggestion for the developers regarding landscaping. Rather than cheezy palm trees, they out to plant Cypress trees. Cypress trees are found in the Mediterranean and it would blend in better.

i'll find out tomorrow what they plan on doing landscape wise. if they aren't def. on the palm trees i'll let them know bout ur cypress trees.....u never know it could happen :)

i know for uptown park phase 1 the magnolia trees were having a hard time surviving due to the heat and great amount of concrete and not enough water for the trees :( this was a concern of borlingi's for phase 2.....

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Outside of the Tomball location and not sure if the Klein one remained open....why not go on and make it a central market to anchor the area? Your going to need a landmark to get folks consistently coming back..grocery stores are the right draw

the rest of the stores I can find closer to 1960 if I need ot get in and out...people are more loyal to grocery stores

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I agree. I think it should be a central market. There's already an HEB on Louetta about 4 miles down. In all of Houston, there is only one Central Market besides the one in the woodlands (which is half HEB).

Outside of the Tomball location and not sure if the Klein one remained open....why not go on and make it a central market to anchor the area? Your going to need a landmark to get folks consistently coming back..grocery stores are the right draw

the rest of the stores I can find closer to 1960 if I need ot get in and out...people are more loyal to grocery stores

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Would like a Central Market, but if they make it a hybrid, they need to call it "Vintage Market".

To demonstrate how much we like HEB, we drive all the way from Longwood to the Klein HEB at Louetta & Steubner. They've got a better Cafe on the Run than the Woodlands Market location. It'll be nice to have a closer store (even better if its a Central Market).

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if I'm develping a multi-million dollar project, why not throw in all the bells and whistles?...a Central Market will create the immediate buzz they're seeking

I'm not a soup and salad guy but when I tried their salad bar at Central Market I was impressed

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Same here. I was impressed too.

if I'm develping a multi-million dollar project, why not throw in all the bells and whistles?...a Central Market will create the immediate buzz they're seeking

I'm not a soup and salad guy but when I tried their salad bar at Central Market I was impressed

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it's true what some say in y not throw in all the bells and whistles for this project, but from a business perspective i think they are concerned w/ the demographic. currently they feel it may be too risky to put in a central market. if not enough patrons buy from central market they will lose business for this "mulit-million" dollar project. so they are going to go the safe route and put in heb first. however, like i stated earlier if heb proves to be a sucess then there is talk that they would change it to a central market. i agree w/ their decision on this cuz on average i tend to hear people already complain about randall's prices :rolleyes:

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I actually prefer the hybrid markets. I love all of the amenities (cafe, butcher, seafood market) that Central Market has to offer, but I've noticed that since they tilt so heavily toward stocking "gourmet" brands, when I'm just looking for regular, everyday brands on many things, they don't sell them or they're stocked in much smaller quantities.

I love trying new and different brands/foods, but more often than not, a common brand is more than sufficient. The hybrid markets give a good mix of both.

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The Grocery biz does neighborhood pricing, based on area demographics. The suburbs in this area have fairly strong and deep demographics. Take a look sometime at the disparity of prices here vs. prices in the city. You pay more out here. I was suprised at how much more we pay at Randall's and Kroger Signature stores than at their stores inside the city. The Longwood Kroger even costs more than the West U Kroger on Buffalo Speedway.

HEB on the other hand, consistently has lower prices and a better overall product in terms of quality.

When you look at how many Central Market stores they've got in Dallas/FW, Austin, and San Antonio, one wonders why they've been so scared to expand in the Houston market beyond their one store? I think HEB would find that there wouldn't be any sticker shock, rather, customers would find more value. Given the same prices, would you rather buy a filet mignon from Kroger or Central Market?

There are lots of BBQ grills in the far NW waiting on the more interesting things that Central Market has to offer.

Edited by mrfootball
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can't figure it out but alot of businesses usually skip or don't put as much emphasis in the Houston area...cannot understand it...

We lose 7-11 but it's everywhere else, Dallas has more "concept" restaurants while we get the basics

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unfortunately no, none of the trees could really be saved due to the amount of parking needed for this project.

if you were to keep trees that would be difficult since trees are random, and this has a planned layout for parking, etc.

plus this is all tilt wall so you need to have easy access for the cranes to lift up these panels.

in uptown park phase 2 this was a minor issue due to distance of the buildings to the back fence and power lines. however, in phase 2 there was this old oak tree that borlingi wanted to save and it did get saved.

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That's Section 2, I'm not sure what's going to take up the largest block there, but a Hotel is slated for the inside corner.

For comparison's sake, it looks like they tore up The Woodlands Market Street pretty good too when they were constructing that project:

Satellite Photo of Woodlands Market St. During Construction

Edited by mrfootball
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I ate at Carvel/Cinnabon once on 1960.....it's regular ice cream to me and I recommend the mall Cinnabons instead...

I thought most of the Cinnabon stores closed?

RC is pretty awesome, but I think a good deal more expensive than Taste of Texas.

I hear their salad bar is phenomenal.

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Randalls is different than Kroger and HEBin that respect. There is only one add for all Tom Thumb/Randalls while Kroger and HEB ads vary area to area. At one time I was getting 2 different HEB ads and 2 different Kroger ads in the mail. One was from the Tomball area in the mail and the other was from The Woodlands area in the paper.

I know Randalls have the same price points because I shop there with a list from the Grocery Game website/coupons and the list is for all TT/Randalls stores.

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Vintage Park Shopping Village Developments

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