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Looking at Shady Acres... flooding?

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Hi,

We're moving back to Houston and we're looking at a newer construction in Shady Acres on 16th near TC Jester. Not much separates this property from White Oak Bayou. Does anyone in the area know if flooding occurred here during Ike or Allison? It's in the 100-year flood plain according to the flood maps (including FEMA's). The home (but not the garage) is elevated according to what I guess is the code for that neighborhood. Street flooding is a given in many Houston 'hoods, but I can't really abide our vehicle getting damaged.

Anyway, thanks for any input.

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Hi,

We're moving back to Houston and we're looking at a newer construction in Shady Acres on 16th near TC Jester. Not much separates this property from White Oak Bayou. Does anyone in the area know if flooding occurred here during Ike or Allison? It's in the 100-year flood plain according to the flood maps (including FEMA's). The home (but not the garage) is elevated according to what I guess is the code for that neighborhood. Street flooding is a given in many Houston 'hoods, but I can't really abide our vehicle getting damaged.

Anyway, thanks for any input.

Don't buy in the floodplain. Just don't. Aside from that it'll affect insurability and rates, aside from that anything in your garage is at risk, and aside from the the appraisal district won't take it into account, flood maps do change from time to time and aren't 100% precise to begin with.

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I live on this street and flooding is not an issue. Tropical Rita and the

last one produced rain but no flooding. However you will pay for flood

Insurance. For these newer pier and beam homes, it will come around $300

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I live on this street and flooding is not an issue. Tropical Rita and the

last one produced rain but no flooding.

Rita and Ike made landfall east of Houston. We didn't get the worst of the wind or rain in either event. TS Allison (2001) came ashore, dumped a bunch of rain, moved back offshore, lingered, then came back ashore and dumped more rain on top of saturated ground. The White Oak Bayou watershed was among the worst affected. I don't remember anything specific about Shady Acres, but it wasn't really on the real estate map back then. What I can tell you is that many neighborhoods both upstream (Shepherd Oaks and Oak Forest) and downstream (Timbergrove) were affected.

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Don't buy in the floodplain. Just don't. Aside from that it'll affect insurability and rates, aside from that anything in your garage is at risk, and aside from the the appraisal district won't take it into account, flood maps do change from time to time and aren't 100% precise to begin with.

Are you saying that the appraisal district does not consider flooding to be negative towards your property values? I have not ever lived in a flood prone area, but that is just absolute and total bs if its true. Flooding absolutely effects property value and if they refuse to acknowledge that then they are not actually considering real market values. Not that the government ever does anything correct, but that is a pretty serious error, and one that does not take a whole lot of effort to get appraisals to show is blatantly wrong.

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Are you saying that the appraisal district does not consider flooding to be negative towards your property values? I have not ever lived in a flood prone area, but that is just absolute and total bs if its true. Flooding absolutely effects property value and if they refuse to acknowledge that then they are not actually considering real market values. Not that the government ever does anything correct, but that is a pretty serious error, and one that does not take a whole lot of effort to get appraisals to show is blatantly wrong.

Many properties still have floodplain adjustments grandfathered into the valuation which they just allow to roll from one year to the next. If you're lucky enough to own property in between some grandfathered parcels, they'll give you the adjustment to make your value equal and uniform. But if there aren't many of those properties in your neighborhood, then you're SOL. They won't consider it as a detriment to market value, and many appraisal review boards will back them up.

It's also screwy that if you own property along Galveston Bay that isn't in a floodplain but that is subject to storm surge and ridiculously high insurance rates, they will refuse to take that into account under any circumstances.

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I have a friend who lives in Shady Acres.  I went to his house once during a rain storm.  Not even a hurricane or tropical storm.  It flooded all over the Heights.  His garage and backyard went under about 4 inches of water.  The house is on pier and beam so it was in no danger.  Some of the streets were over 2 foot deep.  I went through some fun deep water in my truck.  I can also say that crime in that area is high.  Make sure you get a nice alarm.  He got his house cleaned out once.

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