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Bank Of America Tower: Office Building For Downtown


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Walked by at lunch time today (blissfully ignoring the BoA sign in the lobby on my way out the door - prolly mentally registered as likely having to do with home loans or some such)... they're setting the sidewalk trees, and the ground floor lobby suddenly looks a whole lot more finished than it did even last week. 

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On 4/23/2019 at 9:37 AM, Houston19514 said:

 

According to the article linked below, the tower "is expected to deliver in June."

https://www.bisnow.com/houston/news/office/skanska-taps-law-firm-as-new-tenant-at-capital-tower-96156

Great news, if accurate!

On 4/23/2019 at 12:25 PM, jermh said:

There is a sign in front of the Bank of America location in the lobby at 700 Louisiana that says they are permanently closing at 2 pm on June 7th, and opening the new location June 10th. I'd bet the building has to be finished by the 10th.

GREAT!

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  • 2 weeks later...
14 hours ago, jmitch94 said:

 

Nah, would rather have kept that and had this built on one of our dozens of surface parking lots. However if we must erase every iota of history from our city I'm at least glad to see this level of development take its place. 

Totally agree. I guess my question was geared more towards the second part of what you said.

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15 hours ago, jmitch94 said:

 

Nah, would rather have kept that and had this built on one of our dozens of surface parking lots. However if we must erase every iota of history from our city I'm at least glad to see this level of development take its place. 

 

Both agree and disagree. It really depends on context and the situation. What I admire most about this city is that it de-emphasizes the more elitist mentality that arises with preservation and the "well I'm here first and here for all time". Instead the city embraces the idea that each new generation has a chance to redefine what Houston is for them, and the same applies for each future generation. To your remarks this current generation has been the most flexible generation than any that have proceeded it, yet at the same time isn't going to simply beholden to a previous generations interpretations of the city restricting the current one from constructing where they would like to express themselves and how they wish the city to be. There are restraints that are necessary and then there are unnecessary constraints. We can't put top-down constraints that put undo burden on those that come after us. Instead the best we can do is make architecture that can be as flexible as possible to make it easier for those in the future to do something new and interesting, and also pass down that knowledge to others. Houston is not really a city of the past or even the future, but a city for right now. Its why its one of the ultimate modernist cities and its why the city is so dynamic right now.

 

EDIT: This doesn't mean that there aren't trade-offs to this mentality, but it is the prevailing ethos and identity that we carry, and while it does come with some sacrifices I believe that it is what makes us unique and interesting.

Edited by Luminare
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26 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

Both agree and disagree. It really depends on context and the situation. What I admire most about this city is that it de-emphasizes the more elitist mentality that arises with preservation and the "well I'm here first and here for all time". Instead the city embraces the idea that each new generation has a chance to redefine what Houston is for them, and the same applies for each future generation. To your remarks this current generation has been the most flexible generation than any that have proceeded it, yet at the same time isn't going to simply beholden to a previous generations interpretations of the city restricting the current one from constructing where they would like to express themselves and how they wish the city to be. There are restraints that are necessary and then there are unnecessary constraints. We can't put top-down constraints that put undo burden on those that come after us. Instead the best we can do is make architecture that can be as flexible as possible to make it easier for those in the future to do something new and interesting, and also pass down that knowledge to others. Houston is not really a city of the past or even the future, but a city for right now. Its why its one of the ultimate modernist cities and its why the city is so dynamic right now.

 

EDIT: This doesn't mean that there aren't trade-offs to this mentality, but it is the prevailing ethos and identity that we carry, and while it does come with some sacrifices I believe that it is what makes us unique and interesting.

 

So are you completely against top-down constraints? Do you wish we didn't have the historic district protections for the buildings around Market Square and lower Main?

 

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1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

So are you completely against top-down constraints? Do you wish we didn't have the historic district protections for the buildings around Market Square and lower Main?

 

 

I find it a little funny how after reading all of that, the only question you can come back with is a question that could essentially be boiled down to "are you part of my tribe or not?" I'm not going to answer a question like that because I don't need to. Do you have a better more nuanced clarifying question than those?

Edited by Luminare
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30 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

I find it a little funny how after reading all of that, the only question you can come back with is a question that could essentially be boiled down to "are you part of my tribe or not?" I'm not going to answer a question like that because I don't need to. Do you have a better more nuanced clarifying question than those?

 

It's the only question I had about what you said. I am trying to distill all the waxing eloquent to a specific position. The question I asked was fairly clear and direct, in contrast to your post, which was all nuance and no clarity.

 

 

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On 5/10/2019 at 10:36 AM, Nate99 said:

They're really closing in on completion here, they have furniture in the lobby already. 

 

And today the sidewalks are open to mere mortals such as us.

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2 minutes ago, cspwal said:

So do those trees have to rely on the light filtering through the windows from ground level, or are they putting in some grow lights into the atrium?

 

Not even sure they are real at this point, but those lights are seriously bright.  

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1 hour ago, cspwal said:

So do those trees have to rely on the light filtering through the windows from ground level, or are they putting in some grow lights into the atrium?

 

Don't know what species these trees are, but different trees have differing light requirements.  One would expect that the landscape company took this into consideration - it's not your next door neighbor trying to figure out why the roses aren't growing in deep shade while the baby understory tree (Japanese red maple IIRC) is being burned to a crisp beside the driveway (true story).

2 hours ago, brijonmang said:

A closer shot from an Instagram buddy

 

It's really striking coming in on 45 from the north.

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2 hours ago, nate4l1f3 said:

Lol @ 609 Main. Seriously just turn them off. 

 

609 Main's crown lighting looks unfinished, and it's usually so dim that it also looks a bit borked.  The white vertical stripe does OK, though.

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On 5/3/2019 at 9:07 PM, ekdrm2d1 said:

New view.

 

WGHfkIl.jpg

I ran by this building yesterday.  It’s quite beautiful.  And I really appreciate a tree-lined Street.  The giant tree boxes they installed along Capitol and Rusk (right side, above) are nice, but along Travis (left side, above) and Milan they block almost the entire sidewalk.  You can’t even walk two people abreast when going around them.  As a runner in Houston, it’s frustrating how little attention is paid to pedestrian traffic in this city — on a multitude of levels!

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1 hour ago, MarathonMan said:

I ran by this building yesterday.  It’s quite beautiful.  And I really appreciate a tree-lined Street.  The giant tree boxes they installed along Capitol and Rusk (right side, above) are nice, but along Travis (left side, above) and Milan they block almost the entire sidewalk.  You can’t even walk two people abreast when going around them.  As a runner in Houston, it’s frustrating how little attention is paid to pedestrian traffic in this city — on a multitude of levels!

 

I could not agree more. On the Travis St and Milam St sides they took what was otherwise a large sidewalk and made it tiny. Unsure how no one pointed that out. Wish them all the success but kind of hoping the City takes corrective action. It is especially bad on the Travis street side. Otherwise, I think it is a great addition and in my opinion turned out better than expected. 

Edited by urbanize713
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55 minutes ago, CrockpotandGravel said:




Again, I JUST posted a link to the previous post about that in the post DIRECTLY above yours.
 

 

 

 

Sorry, that was a private joke to myself, I should probably keep such things private. 

 

The press release-ish verbiage describing the food halls use the precise phrases "chef driven concept" and "local bar talent" with such regularity, I infer a lack of self-awareness on the author's part.  It reads like boilerplate. 

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1 hour ago, urbanize713 said:

 

I could not agree more. On the Travis St and Milam St sides they took what was otherwise a large sidewalk and made it tiny. Unsure how no one pointed that out. Wish them all the success but kind of hoping the City takes corrective action. It is especially bad on the Travis street side. Otherwise, I think it is a great addition and in my opinion turned out better than expected. 

 

I'm pretty sure they did it that way on the Travis side right by the garage to slow pedestrians as they approach the garage exit/entrance, to minimize the chance of a pedestrian getting run over by a car.  You don't want joggers going full speed by a blind exit (yes, motorists should drive slowly and pay attention to where they are going, but who are we kidding?  This is Houston, where even the Chief of Police runs over a pedestrian in a crosswalk downtown...).

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1 hour ago, rechlin said:

 

I'm pretty sure they did it that way on the Travis side right by the garage to slow pedestrians as they approach the garage exit/entrance, to minimize the chance of a pedestrian getting run over by a car.  You don't want joggers going full speed by a blind exit (yes, motorists should drive slowly and pay attention to where they are going, but who are we kidding?  This is Houston, where even the Chief of Police runs over a pedestrian in a crosswalk downtown...).

 

Apologies, I actual meant the Milam street side is the worst side. The Travis side is actually not as bad because as seen in the picture,  half of that side is driveways. Pic I took before barricades were taken down. 

46993633255_c4e0bd5044_b.jpg

 

Edited by urbanize713
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47 minutes ago, urbanize713 said:

 

Apologies, I actual meant the Milam street side is the worst side. The Travis side is actually not as bad because as seen in the picture,  half of that side is driveways. Pic I took before barricades were taken down. 

46993633255_c4e0bd5044_b.jpg

 

 

Would that perhaps be a design feature intentionally scaled the way it is to keep a car that has inadvertently (or otherwise) jumped the curb from getting through to the glass and further on to the tunnels below?  The planters would need to be thick enough to stop something heavy moving fast and the gap between them and the columns would need to be sufficiently narrow. 

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Was doing a long hike all around the city this past Sunday. Walked past....like wow. They threw down some serious dough for this Food Hall / Lobby / Tunnel area. Its gorgeous! So much marble...marble everywhere. The wood panel ceiling with recessed lighting. This is going to be a real gem in Downtown. I like how we now have so many Food Halls coming online, but all of them are unique and interesting. A wide variety of materials, and meal offerings. Can't wait to go inside.

Edited by Luminare
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4 hours ago, Nate99 said:

 

Would that perhaps be a design feature intentionally scaled the way it is to keep a car that has inadvertently (or otherwise) jumped the curb from getting through to the glass and further on to the tunnels below?  The planters would need to be thick enough to stop something heavy moving fast and the gap between them and the columns would need to be sufficiently narrow. 

I’d say the building columns would serve that purpose.  There is really no excuse for not opening up the sidewalks more to pedestrians — along Milan, especially (as pointed out above).

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