Jump to content
HAIF - Houston's original social media

Bank of America Tower Formerly Capitol Tower


Recommended Posts

I am curious what will happen to many of the older high rises as they age and tenants move to newer ones. Employees, young ones even more so, have an expectation of what an office environment will be. Many of these are built into new structures. Some of these older ones will try to upgrade but at some point they won't be desirable. Rent can only be lowered so far. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1.7k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Yes, the first tower crane is going up and according to a rigger and some Skanska workers, 2 more tower cranes will be going up in the next couple of weeks. The office portion is going up too!!!  They

It's kind of open, at least if you wander around from Pennzoil, there's nothing/no one to stop you continuing through the tunnel level.    It looks really well done. In one mole person's opi

Capitol Tower-Houston-05 2019 by Mabry Campbell, on Flickr   Capitol Tower-Houston-05 2019 by Mabry Campbell, on Flickr

Posted Images

Old skyscrapers can be gutted and remodeled periodically for centuries.  I can't see something like 1001 Fannin ever being torn down.  It might get a new curtain wall at some point in this century to add floor-to-ceiling windows and perhaps might even be barely recognizable after a significant renovation, but there's no real reason to tear it down.  I don't believe the floor spacing is quite as high as the Capitol Tower, but it's close, and certainly not insufficient for a modern office.  I can't see a point where that building will ever be undesirable, as long as it's upgraded and remodeled to meet changing needs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2018/12/19/law-firm-to-move-houston-office-to-capitol-tower.html

 

Quote

 

Law firm to move Houston office to Capitol Tower

 

By Olivia Pulsinelli  – Senior web editor, Houston Business Journal

an hour ago

 

Skanska has signed another tenant for its new skyscraper underway in downtown Houston.

 

Winston & Strawn LLP signed a 15-year lease for about 62,430 square feet in Capitol Tower, at 800 Capitol St., according to a Dec. 19 press release. The Chicago-based law firm currently has its Houston office at 1111 Louisiana St. and plans to move into Capitol Tower in 2020. 

 

Earlier this year, Winston & Strawn ranked No. 25 on the Houston Business Journal’s 2018 Largest Houston-Area Law Firms List, based on its 51 local lawyers at the time. The firm also reported 88 local full-time employees. Winston & Strawn’s website now lists 54 professionals in its Houston office.

 

This latest deal brings Capitol Tower’s office portion to 81 percent preleased. The 35-story, 750,000-square-foot Class A office tower is expected to be complete in the second quarter of 2019. 

 

In addition to Winston & Strawn, North Carolina-based Bank of America Corp. (NYSE: BAC), Houston-based Waste Management Inc. (NYSE: WM) and Houston-based Quantum Energy Partners will also be tenants in Capitol Tower.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
28 minutes ago, urbanize713 said:

 

I do not disagree with you on the overall project. However,  the two story lobby into the tunnels appears to be turning into something unlike anything else downtown. 

 

I completely agree. I don't get why a lot of people on here are so obsessed with height. I'd rather have a shorter tower with excellent ground floor connectivity with the street and the surrounding area than a taller tower that is completely isolating it's self. After all we walk and spent the majority of our time at street level not 50 stories in the air. 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jmitch94 said:

 

I completely agree. I don't get why a lot of people on here are so obsessed with height. I'd rather have a shorter tower with excellent ground floor connectivity with the street and the surrounding area than a taller tower that is completely isolating it's self. After all we walk and spent the majority of our time at street level not 50 stories in the air. 

 

Also agree. Right now in downtown would rather have two 30 story buildings that knock out two parking lots (or twelve 5 story buildings) than 1 single 60 story building that knocks out 1 parking lot. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, downtownian said:

 

Also agree. Right now in downtown would rather have two 30 story buildings that knock out two parking lots (or twelve 5 story buildings) than 1 single 60 story building that knocks out 1 parking lot. 

 

Agree as well. At this point in the cities growth we are looking at specifically infill and density. Once you get that I think a new round of taller buildings will follow as less real estate occurs in downtown. This has always been the case for denser cities like New York. At some point the squeeze happens and thats when its gets more practical to build taller again.

Edited by Luminare
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, downtownian said:

 

Also agree. Right now in downtown would rather have two 30 story buildings that knock out two parking lots (or twelve 5 story buildings) than 1 single 60 story building that knocks out 1 parking lot. 

 

If we are only trying to improve the streetscape and pedestrian life, 3 story buildings are better than 30 story buildings. They don't have parking garages and don't add significant traffic to the streets. They typically have more detailed and variegated facades than their brobdingnagian neighbors. Of course, due to land costs, they aren't feasible to build for the most part, so we have to keep the ones we have.

Edited by H-Town Man
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It isn't going to happen in Houston. Folks here love their AC. I find the tunnels useful on rainy days or excessively hot days. I agree that, in my opinion, the tunnels are used excessively, but so what? People will choose what they prefer. 

 

When I  walk through Uptown I see very few pedestrians there also even though the area is replete with apartments and no tunnel system. I suppose the good side is I never get jostled when I walk.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a 6-7 block walk for me from the bus stop to my office downtown. On rainy or extremely hot days it’s a life saver. If the tunnels weren’t there I would have driven to work everyday instead of using mass transit. I didn’t really have to use them that often but it kept me from having to carry a slicker suit and umbrella to work everyday. For me, without the tunnels, mass transit in downtown Houston would have been unusable.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

As a proud mole person... I'm on the street level when it makes sense (like taking a more direct route), and in the tunnels when that makes sense (like avoiding 97 degree heat or torrential rain).  They're both routes to get from A to B.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The tunnel system serves a legit purpose. Overall, I'm glad we have it. I've used it during inclement weather myself, and it's a great option to have. I just think that 80% of the retail down there would have created an entirely different atmosphere downtown if it was on street level instead.

 

Fortunately, the street level landscape downtown is changing despite the tunnel system. There are a lot of developments and renovations with more street level retail on the horizon. 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

There’s a bit of security in the tunnels also. The homeless are generally kept out. I stood on corners waiting for buses downtown for many years and was accosted a few times, once seriously threatened. I didn’t feel in danger in the tunnels wearing an expensive Swiss watch, on the surface I slipped it into my pocket in some areas. The biggest annoyance in the tunnels were the Lyndon Larouche people. I’d go to the surface just to avoid them.

 

Bottome line though, I always preferred walking on the surface. Most days, even in Houston,  the weather is nice for walking as long as it’s not too far.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, por favor gracias said:

"Lyndon LaRouche people"....lol. They're what telemarketers look like in person. I know nothing about the guy, but his goons' antics have given me little reason to inquire.

 

Exactly... I wrote a long post about how much I agree but then realized this is going too far off topic. I’m out on the evils of tunnels and fringe politicians! :)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m no “fan” of the tunnels, either. But they admittedly serve their purpose, and it seems a bit naive to simply ignore the thousands of office workers who utilize those tunnels every day (and utilized them well before this tower was ever a thing). IMO, any attempt at opening up the tunnels/mole people to the street level is a win by me. 

Ive long wished there was an entire block in western downtown that was essentially a sunken open air plaza, down at the tunnel level, with connectivity to the street level at the corners/cross walks, with retail facing inward along the 4 sides, along with tunnel connections, as a way to help open the tunnels up to the street level.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, cloud713 said:

I’m no “fan” of the tunnels, either. But they admittedly serve their purpose, and it seems a bit naive to simply ignore the thousands of office workers who utilize those tunnels every day (and utilized them well before this tower was ever a thing). IMO, any attempt at opening up the tunnels/mole people to the street level is a win by me. 

Ive long wished there was an entire block in western downtown that was essentially a sunken open air plaza, down at the tunnel level, with connectivity to the street level at the corners/cross walks, with retail facing inward along the 4 sides, along with tunnel connections, as a way to help open the tunnels up to the street level.

They have that in Chicago and it’s great! This will really open the two up to one another. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

They have that in Chicago and it’s great! This will really open the two up to one another. 

 

14 hours ago, cloud713 said:

I’m no “fan” of the tunnels, either. But they admittedly serve their purpose, and it seems a bit naive to simply ignore the thousands of office workers who utilize those tunnels every day (and utilized them well before this tower was ever a thing). IMO, any attempt at opening up the tunnels/mole people to the street level is a win by me. 

Ive long wished there was an entire block in western downtown that was essentially a sunken open air plaza, down at the tunnel level, with connectivity to the street level at the corners/cross walks, with retail facing inward along the 4 sides, along with tunnel connections, as a way to help open the tunnels up to the street level.

 

And maybe we could put a gondola in there too for when the next flood happens.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, cloud713 said:

I’m no “fan” of the tunnels, either. But they admittedly serve their purpose, and it seems a bit naive to simply ignore the thousands of office workers who utilize those tunnels every day (and utilized them well before this tower was ever a thing). IMO, any attempt at opening up the tunnels/mole people to the street level is a win by me. 

Ive long wished there was an entire block in western downtown that was essentially a sunken open air plaza, down at the tunnel level, with connectivity to the street level at the corners/cross walks, with retail facing inward along the 4 sides, along with tunnel connections, as a way to help open the tunnels up to the street level.

 

there's a really great parking lot across the street from one shell plaza. that's very central to the tunnel system. I imagine that land is probably getting preliminary drawings right now for a tower in the next round of downtown building expansion.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, samagon said:

 

there's a really great parking lot across the street from one shell plaza. that's very central to the tunnel system. I imagine that land is probably getting preliminary drawings right now for a tower in the next round of downtown building expansion.

 

Who owns it?

 

That is quite a speculation if not founded.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, samagon said:

 

it's pure speculation on my part.

 

of the location of whole empty blocks (surface parking lots) in downtown, that one is situated very well.

Isn't that the "Bank of the Southwest Tower" lot? I've always been perplexed as to why that block has sat empty for so long. You'd think Hines would grab that block for a really big signature building (BOTSWT was supposed to be 1400 feet) instead of opting to buy a lot that a building was already occupying, having to pay to tear it down, etc. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Timoric said:

We need one brash oil CEO to say they hell with it, I am building something big for Houston, no more of this understated campus crap to look humble.

 

That, and having WTI at around $100 for like 10 years, is our best chance for a supertall.  

Edited by democide
  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Looks good, more open and cold than some of the other downtown food halls but it is also functioning as a gateway from the tunnels. Seems like it will probably lack the intimacy of some of its competitors for this reason. But it probably won't need it to be successful due to the sheer volume of traffic.

 

Michael Hsu did a similar food hall in Austin that was below-grade in a downtown office building, opening up to the first floor lobby above. Like there he has used a lot of wood to soften the corporate atmosphere. This one feels more successful because the surrounding architecture of the building is contemporary versus the 80's architecture of the Austin building, but in both cases you get the feeling that he doesn't really enjoy the office tower environment and wants to collect his fee and move to the next project.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

Looks good, more open and cold than some of the other downtown food halls but it is also functioning as a gateway from the tunnels. Seems like it will probably lack the intimacy of some of its competitors for this reason. But it probably won't need it to be successful due to the sheer volume of traffic.

 

Michael Hsu did a similar food hall in Austin that was below-grade in a downtown office building, opening up to the first floor lobby above. Like there he has used a lot of wood to soften the corporate atmosphere. This one feels more successful because the surrounding architecture of the building is contemporary versus the 80's architecture of the Austin building, but in both cases you get the feeling that he doesn't really enjoy the office tower environment and wants to collect his fee and move to the next project.

 

 

You took the words right out of my mouth. The pictures of the updated progress immediately made me think about the Austin food hall on Congress & Cesar Chavez. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

Looks good, more open and cold than some of the other downtown food halls but it is also functioning as a gateway from the tunnels. Seems like it will probably lack the intimacy of some of its competitors for this reason. But it probably won't need it to be successful due to the sheer volume of traffic.

 

Michael Hsu did a similar food hall in Austin that was below-grade in a downtown office building, opening up to the first floor lobby above. Like there he has used a lot of wood to soften the corporate atmosphere. This one feels more successful because the surrounding architecture of the building is contemporary versus the 80's architecture of the Austin building, but in both cases you get the feeling that he doesn't really enjoy the office tower environment and wants to collect his fee and move to the next project.

 

I agree with your comments on it's location but I honestly believe the synergy that's been created downtown already, will fuel the tunnels in to becoming something much more than a place for workers. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, CrockpotandGravel said:



Another rendering of Mama Ninfa’s Tacos y Tortas coming to Understory, the food hall at Skanska's Capitol Tower in downtown Houston.

From the Understory website:
mmpHuZQ.jpg
(direct link to non-compressed, full size image: https://i.imgur.com/mmpHuZQ.jpg )
 

 

The dude that did the rendering needs to chill a bit with the motion blur. All these people are standing still or stationary in some sense. Unless these people are ridiculous fidgetters, or the whole place is buzzing then what is going on here? To those here who ever get into architecture visualization...motion blur is for...things in motion not standing still. If that even needs to be said.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...
On 3/21/2019 at 6:38 PM, mattyt36 said:

Anyone know when the closed tunnel sections will reopen?

 

(BTW the Downtown District’s website on this is useless ... the map still shows 609 Main as under construction.)

 

from rumors in chase tower, that section is supposed to open Q4, maybe Q1 next year.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Last time I looked, the sign on the easels on the tunnel level in Pennzoil and Esperson said 2Q this year - which certainly looks doable, if a bit tight.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, mollusk said:

Last time I looked, the sign on the easels on the tunnel level in Pennzoil and Esperson said 2Q this year - which certainly looks doable, if a bit tight.

 

I recall seeing the same, though perhaps something would slow them opening all the way to Chase, no idea there. In any case they are working on interior trim, sidewalk pavers and landscaping. They could certainly be done in a couple of months based on what you see at street level, if the tunnel stuff is behind, it could of course take longer. 

 

These food halls seem to take their sweet time getting built out. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a sign in front of the Bank of America location in the lobby at 700 Louisiana that says they are permanently closing at 2 pm on June 7th, and opening the new location June 10th. I'd bet the building has to be finished by the 10th.

Edited by jermh
Typos
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Bank of America Tower Formerly Capitol Tower

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



×
×
  • Create New...