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DrLan34

The Recenter: Phase I & II

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Several reasons. There are research, treatment, funding, and academic benefits for a location based in the medical center. For starters you have a "captive" workforce actively seeking internship and volunteer opportunities in such an institution. You have a continual need for participants in substance abuse treatment research medical center institutions (Baylor University comes to mind first) You also have a level of expertise in the various communities of practice that is in close proximity which would benefit the Men's Center greatly in their relationships with treatment professionals. Right now their immediate neighbors are convienence stores, bars, high-end apartment complexes, and assorted characters that hang out nearby. Not much synergy there.

Let's say that the Men's Center can accomplish their mission on 1.5 acres. The difference between $150 per square foot in the TMC and $6 per square foot in Third Ward is $144 per square foot. That's a $9.4 million difference...up-front.

That they could hire a driver to run a 24-hour on-call shuttle service to the TMC in perpetuity...forever...for that amount of money (and its time value) and still have a whole bunch left over with which to pile on the client services. Of course, that assumes that they regularly give a crap about any of the things you mention...which I'll bet they don't particularly in the first place.

So out of curiosity, why do you think I would dismiss you as a conservative? That's rather odd.

Yes, it certainly is.

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Several reasons. There are research, treatment, funding, and academic benefits for a location based in the medical center. For starters you have a "captive" workforce actively seeking internship and volunteer opportunities in such an institution. You have a continual need for participants in substance abuse treatment research medical center institutions (Baylor University comes to mind first) You also have a level of expertise in the various communities of practice that is in close proximity which would benefit the Men's Center greatly in their relationships with treatment professionals. Right now their immediate neighbors are convienence stores, bars, high-end apartment complexes, and assorted characters that hang out nearby. Not much synergy there.

I'll pile on to what Niche said.

They're treating alcoholics, not curing cancer by splitting the atom in geosynchonous orbit. Maybe I'm missing the "captivity" of medical center employees, but I wouldn't figure that volunteers for such outfits would be drawn from people put out by the inconvenience of going a few miles from their work in the TMC to Midtown. Getting drunks with no resources of their own to turn their lives around isn't a job for the highest rent "treatment professionals" in Houston.

Could they do a marginally better job of it in the TMC? Possibly. Could they do an even better job of it without paying thousands extra in rent every year? Without question.

The lack of ability to understand costs and benefits even by people with fairly strong communication skills frightens me to no end in an election year.

And how can one not see a synergy between alcoholics and bars/vagrants?

Edited by Nate99

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That they could hire a driver to run a 24-hour on-call shuttle service to the TMC in perpetuity...forever...for that amount of money (and its time value) and still have a whole bunch left over with which to pile on the client services. Of course, that assumes that they regularly give a crap about any of the things you mention...which I'll bet they don't particularly in the first place.

I also doubt they care for any of the things I listed though I think they should. Non-paid internships, residencies, and pro-bono experienced staff can offer significant cost savings and potentially increase the ability of an institution to receive grants and additional funding.

It's impossible to speculate what the true cost of operating in the TMC would be (even though I tossed a listing out for grins) as there are so many ways an institution could exist there. Purchasing property as mentioned earlier is not the only option, though I agree with what others have said; The Men's Center is not interested in having someone else partner with or oversee their treatment approach. But now that I've had a bit more time to think about it the Upper Kirby area near the future Richmond light rail would make even more sense. There is a shocking lack of diversity there.

Then again my only true point of continuing this topic was to drive this thread up to the top for searches on "the men's center Houston". Still have a ways to go.

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I also doubt they care for any of the things I listed though I think they should. Non-paid internships, residencies, and pro-bono experienced staff can offer significant cost savings and potentially increase the ability of an institution to receive grants and additional funding.

It's impossible to speculate what the true cost of operating in the TMC would be (even though I tossed a listing out for grins) as there are so many ways an institution could exist there. Purchasing property as mentioned earlier is not the only option, though I agree with what others have said; The Men's Center is not interested in having someone else partner with or oversee their treatment approach. But now that I've had a bit more time to think about it the Upper Kirby area near the future Richmond light rail would make even more sense. There is a shocking lack of diversity there.

Those people can drive or be picked up at their doorstep on-call by the free shuttle service. Hell, they could even buy a limo and stock it with good booze with Third Ward savings over the TMC. And yes, I can speculate to the true cost of operating in the TMC. I just did, and that was a conservative estimate.

You're clearly not stupid, so I don't think that you're being intellectually honest with yourself or others. Away with you, troll.

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You guys are arguing in circles. The real solution is for Houston to do what San Antonio did and create another Haven for Hope. Find a place out of the way and consolidate all services in one huge location. It's working in San Antonio. The various orgs in Houston need to get over themselves and work together.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/15/san-antonio-officials-ope_n_539471.html

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Haven for Hope is in Cattleman Square, just a few blocks off downtown. The NIMBYs in this thread will not accept this for Houston.

Edited by kylejack

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You guys are arguing in circles. The real solution is for Houston to do what San Antonio did and create another Haven for Hope. Find a place out of the way and consolidate all services in one huge location. It's working in San Antonio. The various orgs in Houston need to get over themselves and work together.

http://www.huffingto...e_n_539471.html

Haven for Hope is in Cattleman Square, just a few blocks off downtown. The NIMBYs in this thread will not accept this for Houston.

That's not a bad idea... the biggest question is: Where would Houston put something like this? It is clear that it should not go in Midtown, Downtown, Neartown, Uptown, or anywhere inside the loop. So where then?

Edited by LTAWACS

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That's not a bad idea... the biggest question is: Where would Houston put something like this? It is clear that it should not go in Midtown, Downtown, Neartown, Uptown, or anywhere inside the loop. So where then?

That is not clear.

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But now that I've had a bit more time to think about it the Upper Kirby area near the future Richmond light rail would make even more sense. There is a shocking lack of diversity there.

I wish The Men's Center all the luck in their mission, but if you think putting a rehab facility for homeless drunks improves any neighborhood in any way, shape or form, much less one with a lot going for it for people with cash to spend, I think we're done here.

Edited by Nate99

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Not bad... Plus we could set it up so that their beds are on some kind of rolling platform (with the wheels out of sight). Then all we have to do is wait till they're asleep, roll'em up onto a waiting cargo ship, and ship them out!

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I knew it would bring jokes... but I'm serious. I think this facility could really be put to good use for a purpose like this. Like I said earlier, taxpayers have already footed the bill for a good chunk of the cost. Just remodel it to have beds and kitchens, then allow non-profits to operate the thing.

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Houston Center for Sobriety is opening up soon: http://swamplot.com/downtown-warehouse-to-sober-up-and-get-a-new-life/2012-08-16/

I wonder how often this will be used for homeless types that get pinched on public drunkenness. Maybe it will relieve some of the burden on our jails and homeless services. I really think jail should only be used for people who are an active danger to others, and not merely disorderly.

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To misquote the great Yoda, "There is another" option. Somebody phone Ms. Parker and have her create a new tax, I mean fee or something so we can do more than air-condition the AstroTurf.*

133_astrodome_one_lg.jpg

*No Nitch, I'm not sersiously suggesting that:

-They should do this

-The AstroTurf is currently being air-conditioned

-Ms. Parker divert taxpayer, um er "Feepayer" monies to this

-This Mid-Century Modern wonder should be used to house them when the current build is okay.

Edited by TGM
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That's not a bad idea... the biggest question is: Where would Houston put something like this? It is clear that it should not go in Midtown, Downtown, Neartown, Uptown, or anywhere inside the loop. So where then?

Kuwait.

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You can't just move in and toss out people like they are garbage. Money buys property but not always influence. And no zoning is why overall the city of houston is a joke.

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You can't just move in and toss out people like they are garbage. Money buys property but not always influence. And no zoning is why overall the city of houston is a joke.

No, the city is a joke because of inefficiency, corruption, and lack of fiscal discipline.

The lack of zoning has ensured that relatively affordable homes can be built in the city, which are purchased by those moving from cities with zoning in place. Not much left to zone in Detroit, Buffalo,etc.

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OMG, this is beyond wonderful news!  props for sharing urbannizer.  even houston's mens center shall now become state of the art.  simply beautiful news.....

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Everything is an eyesore? Geez. We need to give that word a rest

Okay, the current building is a dilapidated run down hole in the wall surrounded by homeless people.  It is not pleasant to see when you drive by or ride by on the train.    

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I couldn't have said it any better... unless I said eyesore.

 

Okay, the current building is a dilapidated run down hole in the wall surrounded by homeless people.  It is not pleasant to see when you drive by or ride by on the train.    

 

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New housing complex for the Men's Center. 

 

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ahp-grant-to-help-mens-center-build-new-housing-complex-in-houston-300141578.html

 

The grant will help the Houston-based nonprofit build a $12.2 million, 56-unit housing complex for men and women ages 18 and older who are recovering from substance abuse and other crisis situations.

 

The project is in the permitting stage and is expected to begin construction soon at 3809 Main Street in an area of Houston known as Midtown. The housing complex will replace The Men's Center's two main buildings that face Main Street, which will be torn down.

 

http://www.hrc.hctx.net/news/

 

post-5633-0-72567400-1449776307_thumb.jp

 

Meanwhile, Phase II, The Hope Center, is slated to begin this year. It will replace the original central facility in front of downtown's light rail. The new building will include office space for staff including the new case managers, a dining hall, and conference rooms for groups that meet regularly at the Center, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous, and Narcotics Anonymous.

 

Edited by DrLan34
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This is ridiculous, I wish this would be built somewhere else. Why would you build this on main st next to all these new apartments, new theater, etc. 

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It's a great addition to the area, and is in the perfect location. Happy to see some movement finally on this one.

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So ignoring the fact that you couldn't read well enough to notice the differences between the two phases for just a second, I find it hilarious that you somehow think the needy and the less fortunate should be denied access to area simply because of their situation; that sweeping the issue under the rug, out of sight out of mind style, somehow solves the issue of homelessness.

Now, back to the reading comprehension, or lack thereof; you should know that the facility going up on the rail line is for the offices and for those who are already seeking help for their addictions. You get that, right? It's not for "drug addicts and bums" although I love the sweeping generalization. It's for the former drug addicts and bums.

It's hilarious that, on a forum that complains about the homeless issue in downtown, you would also complain about facilities that are trying desperately to solve this issue at "ground zero", if you would. The only other option I see is loading all the homeless drug addicts and bums into trucks and shipping them off to a camp devoted to these groups, and that, my friend, is why I would like to introduce to you a man who is this close to doing such a thing; Donald Trump. Make America Great Again!*

*by way of internment camps

Edited by BigFootsSocks
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1024x1024.jpg

http://www.chron.com/business/real-estate/article/Midtown-Men-s-Center-rebrands-and-rebuilds-6697104.php?cmpid=twitter-desktop

 

The Men's Center, a 65-year-old Houston recovery organization for alcoholics and drug users, is rebuilding its Midtown campus, rebranding and opening its doors to women.

 

Demolition will begin today on the group's existing buildings along Main Street for a new facility to be developed at 3809 Main. The planned five-story, 50,000-square-foot building is scheduled to open in spring 2017.

 statement from design firm Brave Architecture described elements of the new building: 

 

Corrugated metal panels and tall storefront windows clad the first floor, delivering strength that can endure the heavy traffic on Main Street with transparency necessary to weave the building into the urban fabric.

Separating the dining room and kitchen from the meeting room and lounge is an 18-foot wide breezeway perpendicular to Main Street, which is treated as an extension of the urban cityscape expressive of the public mission of (Recenter), and provides a covered, off-street space for the visitors to congregate.

The building's orientation parallel to Main Street also provides optimum orientation for naturally ventilating the hallways. At the end of each hallway will be a screened wall and a concealed ventilation fan ensuring comfortable air movement while providing security and protection from the elements. The residential floors are connected by an open-air stairwell that leads down to the second floor terrace, also supplying the hallways with natural light and acting as a solar chimney to ventilate hot air during summer days.

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So ignoring the fact that you couldn't read well enough to notice the differences between the two phases for just a second, I find it hilarious that you somehow think the needy and the less fortunate should be denied access to area simply because of their situation; that sweeping the issue under the rug, out of sight out of mind style, somehow solves the issue of homelessness.

Now, back to the reading comprehension, or lack thereof; you should know that the facility going up on the rail line is for the offices and for those who are already seeking help for their addictions. You get that, right? It's not for "drug addicts and bums" although I love the sweeping generalization. It's for the former drug addicts and bums.

It's hilarious that, on a forum that complains about the homeless issue in downtown, you would also complain about facilities that are trying desperately to solve this issue at "ground zero", if you would. The only other option I see is loading all the homeless drug addicts and bums into trucks and shipping them off to a camp devoted to these groups, and that, my friend, is why I would like to introduce to you a man who is this close to doing such a thing; Donald Trump. Make America Great Again!*

*by way of internment camps

The press release says that it will also be a detox center for people just entering recovery.  It also says that it will provide meals for the homeless still living on the streets.  To suggest that this won't be an eye sore and/or dangerous is naive.  No doubt these services are needed, but i agree with the point that perhaps the best place for this is not along the rail across the street from new "luxury" apartments, class a office space, and new retail/restaurants.  They could have sold the land and moved just a few blocks off the rail -- with the money they saved, they could have offered much more in services.  

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Having a differing opinion is naïve? To not jump to the same assumption that this is automatically going to be a bad area is naïve? No, you know what's actually naïve? To complain about the homeless issue in downtown, but making the group that wants to address the issue at the source move off of a street that can only be used by well-off people. Why should we reward the people who want to get off the streets, to fight and overcome their addiction, with an inconvenience?

I already addressed that in my comment responding to the person who claimed that this is going to make "drug addicts and bums" infest the area.

Just because they have an addiction or are not well-off does not mean they are lesser human beings and shouldn't have access to the same things we enjoy, especially if they are making all attempts to rid themselves of this stigma.

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Having a differing opinion is naïve? To not jump to the same assumption that this is automatically going to be a bad area is naïve? No, you know what's actually naïve? To complain about the homeless issue in downtown, but making the group that wants to address the issue at the source move off of a street that can only be used by well-off people. Why should we reward the people who want to get off the streets, to fight and overcome their addiction, with an inconvenience?

I already addressed that in my comment responding to the person who claimed that this is going to make "drug addicts and bums" infest the area.

Just because they have an addiction or are not well-off does not mean they are lesser human beings and shouldn't have access to the same things we enjoy, especially if they are making all attempts to rid themselves of this stigma.

Yes it is naive to believe that people other than you won't think that a homeless shelter and soup kitchen in the middle of a trendy part of town is an eyesore and/or dangerous.  

 

There are certain areas of town that I think we should be proud of, and we should not plop a magnet for homeless people down in those areas.  For example, I also don't think we should move the Greyhound station to the middle of the Galleria or line Discovery Green with nothing but halfway houses.   This part of midtown along the rail is becoming one of those areas that we could be proud of.  

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You know what I would be proud of in Houston? Places where regular, working-class people can find affordable housing and get on with their lives. I don't care if it's trendy or fancy or whatever.

Edited by gmac
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Other than misusing the word naïve, by accusing me of speaking in absolutes, which I already established was my opinion, you yourself are speaking in absolutes, which is hypocrisy. It's also hypocritical to complain about the homeless issue while also complaining about the services that are trying to fix this issue.

There's no way you can argue that these people, who are trying to fix their life, do not "deserve" to walk along Main Street by using Murphy's Law as your argument.

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https://www.bisnow.com/houston/news/commercial-real-estate/recenter-plans-to-consolidate-into-new-building-53701

 

Recenter, a nonprofit that serves homeless men and women struggling with drug addiction, is tearing down its two 1960s-era buildings and will soon break ground on a new facility. The two buildings slated for demolition are at 3805 Main St and 3809 Main St in Midtown. The knock-down process will finish next week, according to the Houston Business Journal.

 

Recenter’s new 50k SF complex will include housing, a commercial kitchen and dining hall, a GED education space, and a nonmedical detox area. It'll be constructed on the footprints of the old buildings, as well as a vacant lot at 3815 Main that the charity owns. All told, that’s around half an acre, and the new address will be 3809 Main St.

 

The rebuild will cost about $12M. Groundbreaking will be in March 2016 and is projected to complete by Q2 2017. 
 

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