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307-Acres Near NRG Stadium (Formerly UT Research Campus Proposal)


Mister X

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swtsig

I respect your knowledge and appreciate your fairness in your response, however I do think there is a

negative, and no one seems to want to address my question about what this will do to the plans to build the new TMC research campus that was planned with UT as a major player. They won't do both.

Its not just U of H that would be affected.

Bob, other people have responded to your question if you haven't seen it yet, but just to reiterate; this isn't for UT med and will most likely coincide with the TMC 3 expansion.

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swtsig

I respect your knowledge and appreciate your fairness in your response, however I do think there is a

negative, and no one seems to want to address my question about what this will do to the plans to build the new TMC research campus that was planned with UT as a major player. They won't do both.

Its not just U of H that would be affected.

As much as I would like the TMC3 Campus to come to fruition it is still very much so just a concept. The TMC does not have funding for the development and UT or any of the other institutions have signed on for the campus.

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As much as I would like the TMC3 Campus to come to fruition it is still very much so just a concept. The TMC does not have funding for the development and UT or any of the other institutions have signed on for the campus.

Bob, other people have responded to your question if you haven't seen it yet, but just to reiterate; this isn't for UT med and will most likely coincide with the TMC 3 expansion.

Thank you both for your clarification and sorry if I mussed it.

I hope your both right.

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As someone that went to neither school, my two cents are that if this new campus threatens TMC3 then I am firmly against it. With no disrespect, I would much rather have (and think it would be much better for the city to have) TMC3 than another UT Arlington or insert other sataleite UT campus. Those UT satellites are fine schools, but it would not be a "game changers" here in Houston. TMC3 might not be either, but it's got a chance. I would like to see a clear statement from UT on TMC3.

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Just a thought: This campus has been advertised as a "research" campus. The qualifier indicates that the campus would not function as a traditional four-year university. It follows, then, that the campus would not compete for undergraduate admissions. It may plausibly attract some local graduate students or faculty who might otherwise choose UH. However, academic recruitment at the graduate and faculty level typically draws from a national or international pool of applicants, especially for highly-competitive, well-funded departments.

 

Anyone familiar with the academic job market will know that there is a surplus of highly-qualified graduate students, post-docs, and faculty in the United States and abroad. The University of Texas System has access to tremendous resources (probably inequitable access, as some have noted) in the PUF, which has only grown larger thanks to the fracking boom. They are proposing to invest these otherwise untapped resources in Houston; recruit a national pool of talented, yet underutilized applicants to Houston; and presumably bring greater federal and private research grants to Houston. This is intellectual and financial capital that would simply go unused or go elsewhere.

 

The end result should be more academic faculty, more highly-qualified students, more research dollars, and more capital investment in the Houston area, all in addition to the important growth occurring at the University of Houston. The centers of innovation in this country were preceded by a concentration of top-notch academic institutions and subsequent growth in the knowledge class: Silicon Valley and North Carolina's Research Triangle come to mind. Why can't we have this, too?

 

And I say all this as an Aggie.

 

Now, would it be more sensible to instead simply share the PUF more equally? Perhaps. But that's a separate, if germane, discussion.

 

Edited by The Ozone Files
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As someone that went to neither school, my two cents are that if this new campus threatens TMC3 then I am firmly against it. With no disrespect, I would much rather have (and think it would be much better for the city to have) TMC3 than another UT Arlington or insert other sataleite UT campus. Those UT satellites are fine schools, but it would not be a "game changers" here in Houston. TMC3 might not be either, but it's got a chance. I would like to see a clear statement from UT on TMC3.

This would only further encourage TMC3 to happen. A nearby talent pool of healthcare graduates and researchers available to be hired on by core institutions and new biotech companies is a win for everyone.
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Seems like a lot of posters need to take a look at what UT Is actually proposing. Hint: it's not UT-Houston or any other sort of full degree-granting campus.

Fair point. I was being charitable. I should have said I would rather have TMC3 than something even worse than UT-Arlington, which as you note is what is being proposed.. If it won't affect the funding of TMC3, then let's hear that from UT officials.

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williammcraven*750xx768-1024-26-0.jpg

Although specific plans for the land have not yet been decided, ChancellorWilliam McRaven called it a game changer for Houston, the UT System and the state of Texas.

“This will not be a University of Texas at Houston. Rather, it will be an ‘intellectual hub’ for UT — an opportunity for all our campuses to take advantage of the Houston professionals in the fields of medicine, energy, engineering, business, aerospace, health care and the arts,” McRaven said in prepared remarks to the board of regents on Nov. 5.

Early next year, McRaven will convene a task force of civic leaders, legislators, academic and health presidents, faculty, students and regents, along with other constituents, to begin the planning process for the property.

“We have educational and research gems across our UT System portfolio that, if leveraged with key sectors of health, energy and business in Houston, will allow us to accelerate discoveries and expand research and educational opportunities — complementing our existing UT health institutions — and significantly grow our state’s economic competitiveness,” McRaven said in a Nov. 5 statement.

 

Other “quantum leaps” within the strategic plan listed within the statement are:

  • The Texas Prospect Initiative to foster unprecedented levels of engagement and collaboration between higher education and preK-12, with a focus on improving literacy;
  • The creation of the American Leadership Program, which will make leadership and ethics training part of the core curriculum for all students at UT institutions;
  • Renewed investment in bringing world-class faculty to UT institutions;
  • A laser focus on enhancing fairness and opportunity for women and minorities in leadership positions at UT institutions;
  • Developing a UT Health Care Enterprise to leverage UT System’s size and expertise to improve the health of Texas and beyond;
  • Expanding research into brain health by investing more into the existing, revolutionary programs at several UT institutions, establishing another at UT Austin, and tying efforts together to accelerate discoveries and treatments for diseases of the brain;
  • Building a UT Network for National Security, a systemwide alliance that will confront the world’s most vexing problems facing our nation.

 

 

Edited by monarch
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Just a thought: This campus has been advertised as a "research" campus. The qualifier indicates that the campus would not function as a traditional four-year university. It follows, then, that the campus would not compete for undergraduate admissions. It may plausibly attract some local graduate students or faculty who might otherwise choose UH. However, academic recruitment at the graduate and faculty level typically draws from a national or international pool of applicants, especially for highly-competitive, well-funded departments.

 

Anyone familiar with the academic job market will know that there is a surplus of highly-qualified graduate students, post-docs, and faculty in the United States and abroad. The University of Texas System has access to tremendous resources (probably inequitable access, as some have noted) in the PUF, which has only grown larger thanks to the fracking boom. They are proposing to invest these otherwise untapped resources in Houston; recruit a national pool of talented, yet underutilized applicants to Houston; and presumably bring greater federal and private research grants to Houston. This is intellectual and financial capital that would simply go unused or go elsewhere.

 

The end result should be more academic faculty, more highly-qualified students, more research dollars, and more capital investment in the Houston area, all in addition to the important growth occurring at the University of Houston. The centers of innovation in this country were preceded by a concentration of top-notch academic institutions and subsequent growth in the knowledge class: Silicon Valley and North Carolina's Research Triangle come to mind. Why can't we have this, too?

 

And I say all this as an Aggie.

 

Now, would it be more sensible to instead simply share the PUF more equally? Perhaps. But that's a separate, if germane, discussion.

 

This exactly. I'm an OU alum and am happy to knock UT when the opportunity arises, but this is a no-brainer for Houston. 

 

Also, when I read things like this:

 

 

 

  • The creation of the American Leadership Program, which will make leadership and ethics training part of the core curriculum for all students at UT institutions;
  •  
  • Building a UT Network for National Security, a systemwide alliance that will confront the world’s most vexing problems facing our nation.

 

This suggests that the State and UT are interested in investing in Houston as Texas' global city. That's incredibly exciting for so many reasons.

 

At the same time, it might also explain the trepidation of so many local politicians - they like the current machine for what it is, and don't want that sort of transformative development.

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Just a thought: This campus has been advertised as a "research" campus. The qualifier indicates that the campus would not function as a traditional four-year university. It follows, then, that the campus would not compete for undergraduate admissions. It may plausibly attract some local graduate students or faculty who might otherwise choose UH. However, academic recruitment at the graduate and faculty level typically draws from a national or international pool of applicants, especially for highly-competitive, well-funded departments.

 

Anyone familiar with the academic job market will know that there is a surplus of highly-qualified graduate students, post-docs, and faculty in the United States and abroad. The University of Texas System has access to tremendous resources (probably inequitable access, as some have noted) in the PUF, which has only grown larger thanks to the fracking boom. They are proposing to invest these otherwise untapped resources in Houston; recruit a national pool of talented, yet underutilized applicants to Houston; and presumably bring greater federal and private research grants to Houston. This is intellectual and financial capital that would simply go unused or go elsewhere.

 

The end result should be more academic faculty, more highly-qualified students, more research dollars, and more capital investment in the Houston area, all in addition to the important growth occurring at the University of Houston. The centers of innovation in this country were preceded by a concentration of top-notch academic institutions and subsequent growth in the knowledge class: Silicon Valley and North Carolina's Research Triangle come to mind. Why can't we have this, too?

 

And I say all this as an Aggie.

 

Now, would it be more sensible to instead simply share the PUF more equally? Perhaps. But that's a separate, if germane, discussion.

 

Yes, a thousand times yes. This is the point I have been trying to make. It seems there are two camps. The first camp is choosing to hear what they want and believe big bad ole UT is coming for their school. The second camp is listening to what has ACTUALLY been proposed and how it benefits the city as a whole and see no downside. Who is being resonable and who is not?

 

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Fair point. I was being charitable. I should have said I would rather have TMC3 than something even worse than UT-Arlington, which as you note is what is being proposed.. If it won't affect the funding of TMC3, then let's hear that from UT officials.

I don't see this in any way as "worse than UT-Arlington" (and for the record I never noted that UT proposed anything "worse than UT-Arlington"). They have proposed something entirely different from UT-ARLINGTON,

Further, if, as you claim, they are indeed proposing something worse than UT-Arlington, what does UH have to worry about? Do all you Cougs really think so little of your school that you think it can't hold its own against an institution worse than UT-Arlington?

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It would be cool to see a joint effort at this campus between UT, UH, A&M, and Rice. A centralized, joint research campus near the TMC could turn into a substantial biotech hub. Of course, that takes a lot of money and a lot of coordination. However, it is a pie-in-the-sky thought.

 

You mean the exact concept of the TMC 3?

 

And as a current UH student if this truly is just a research campus then I'm all for it. I think most politicians are upset that UT went behind their back and in-essence ignored proper procedures. 

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You mean the exact concept of the TMC 3?

And as a current UH student if this truly is just a research campus then I'm all for it. I think most politicians are upset that UT went behind their back and in-essence ignored proper procedures.

I'll admit, I haven't paid any attention to TMC3, nor did I know anything about it. However, if that concept could be achieved here or there, it would be a boon for the city, but that's obvious.

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I don't see this in any way as "worse than UT-Arlington" (and for the record I never noted that UT proposed anything "worse than UT-Arlington"). They have proposed something entirely different from UT-ARLINGTON,

Further, if, as you claim, they are indeed proposing something worse than UT-Arlington, what does UH have to worry about? Do all you Cougs really think so little of your school that you think it can't hold its own against an institution worse than UT-Arlington?

Again, I didn't go to either school -- all I care about is how this affects TMC3.  If putting in a school worse than UT-Arlington kills TMC3 then I am against it.  

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  • 3 weeks later...

Still getting worse...

^^^ oh you haven't seen nothing yet my wonderful pal h-townman, just wait until we officially announce our forthcoming DKR SEZ / MONCRIEF NEUHAUS (football stadium full enclosure and expansion / renovation / redevelopment project.  this will undoubtedly make DKR MEMORIAL STADIUM... the collegiate stadium of futuristic dreams.  not to mention, our new and forthcoming futuristic state of the art $600mm+ basketball arena... the established sentiment will only get worser.... 

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Y'all are wasting your time yakking about the decision making process of the bureaucracy involved here. Can we get back to something that matters......like the WHERE of this whole thing?

 

What's the outlook for a single family home owner about a mile away from this proposed development? Is our sleepy little corner of the loop finally getting it's wakeup call?

 

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Y'all are wasting your time yakking about the decision making process of the bureaucracy involved here. Can we get back to something that matters......like the WHERE of this whole thing?

What's the outlook for a single family home owner about a mile away from this proposed development? Is our sleepy little corner of the loop finally getting it's wakeup call?

Yes. Our property values are going to skyrocket. I live in Knollwood Village, and it's the closest single family neighborhood inside the loop to this. I expect my tax bill to be through the roof once this is built.

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  • 2 weeks later...

UT closes on 100 acres in Houston, plans to buy 200 more

 

The University of Texas has taken a key step in a Houston expansion that some area leaders have called an "invasion."

 

UT announced Friday it had closed on 100 acres in southwest Houston and plans to buy 200 more in coming months. The announcement is- a sign that UT leaders are not slowing a planned expansion, as many area lawmakers have asked.

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I think the simple answer from a Houston perspective is: more is better. UT is going to deploy the resources from that $25 billion endowment somewhere in the state - why not try to maximize the amount coming to Houston? UH should negotiate a no faculty poaching agreement and Big 12 entry.

I tend to agree that an additional campus would benefit Houston as a city. A medical school is a long-term objective of UH, and a little trading to clear the path for this campus might secure funding for that endeavour. I don't think a Big 12 invite is in the cards at the moment. The NCAA recently voted to change its rules, permitting the Big 12 to hold a title game without divisions. That vote mooted the impetus for the league to grow again, regardless of UT's wishes.

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UT is working to organize a task force, which will spend the next year molding a vision for the land. Members of that task force -- which could include representatives from the University of Houston, Texas Southern University, the state's Higher Education Coordinating Board and the mayor's office -- will be asked to "leave their preconceived notions about higher education...at the door," McRaven said.

 

McRaven is scheduled to make his pitch for the project to the state's higher education coordinating board on Thursday.

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A lot of people here don't seem to agree with the notion that competition is good.. I'm not sure if that's because they truly believe competition is detrimental, or if they are merely trying to look out for their school. Most cities would welcome a new university.. Yet for some reason people here feel it's in the best interest of their alma mater (but not necessarily thinking about what's good for the city) to push research dollars and thousands of bright young minds away from Houston.

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I like this plan personally. I think this is good for Houston in many ways.

1) We could always use more schools. Ask Metro LA, Metro Boston, SF Bay, DC/Balt, NYC area, Chicago metro, Raleigh Triangle, etc etc if they would accept losing any of their great higher learning schools and they'll tell you no way IMO. . The jobs created and investment in the education industry will be a boon for Houston in a time when oil prices are plummeting every day to new lows. It's a sturdy white collar industry presence like this that will help Houston diversify. Colleges and universities make substantial money from student housing, books, on campus things, etc.

2) love its location. It'll be a great extension to the greater TMC area. It's great to have an urban school campus develop densely adjacent to the NRG Park and TMC areas. With accessible options to light rail, and McRaven wants to get LRT extended to the campus, it's in a great site to continue the footprint of the urban development occurring south of Midtown all the way to the NRG Park, Museum district, and TMC areas and now extending further south of loop 610. Thanks to UT's plans.

3) this is great for the community. It gives more school options, and it will eventually as it seasons into Houston's livelihood over the course of a few decades, will become an integral part of the community's culture. I.e. Sports, events, socials, research competitions, recruiters, etc. Houston has the chance to build a new school brand, not to compete with UH and Rice but to compliment them in terms of offerings in the Metro Houston area.

I doubt a UT-Houston will ever be better than UT-Austin, but UT-Dallas is pretty good now, accredited and recognized public university, UT-Houston can certainly compete well with that.

4) I like its urban concept renderings. I like the whole thing. It's a win, esp. considering what's on the land now.

DEW IT UT!

Edited by Sellanious Caesar
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  • 3 weeks later...

UH Declines Spot on UT Planning Group

 

The University of Houston declined an invitation to sit on a task force planning the use of more than 300 acres in southwest Houston that the University of Texas is purchasing, a UT spokeswoman said Tuesday.

 

UH officials have vocally opposed UT's planned Houston expansion, saying the flagship is acting without consulting the city's existing schools. The UT spokeswoman said UH was offered a spot on the 18-member panel, but declined the offer.

 

The group -- an executive committee that will pull in various other experts and community leaders over the next year to help guide UT's plans for the land -- includes representatives from Texas Southern University and Rice University. Multiple UH alumni are on the task force, however.

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http://www.bizjournals.com/houston/morning_call/2016/02/uh-turns-down-spot-on-ut-system-task-force-but.html

 

So UH wants a say, but doesn't accept when an offer for a say is extended by UT? 

 

 

The University of Texas System selected the task force to help launch its Houston campus, but one important city institution remains absent from the group.

 

The University of Houston, which has spoken out against UT's planned expansion to 300 acres in the city since it was first announced this past fall, declined an invitation from Chancellor William McRaven to join the task force,the Houston Chronicle reports. UH did not immediately respond to the Chronicle's request for comment.

 

Edited by AREJAY
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International air and seaports have little to do with research. I'm thinking it has more to do with the brain power of TMC.

Like all these "valleys" innovation tend to come in clusters, and TMC is the strongest congregation of mental will in Texas and maybe the entire south.

If an excuse for the location needs to be had then that would be it.

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  • The title was changed to 307-Acres Near NRG Stadium (Formerly UT Research Campus Proposal)

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