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IronTiger

Parts of Houston that remind you of somewhere else

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OK, we all know that Rice Village isn't going to be Greenwich Village, downtown Houston isn't Manhattan, Montrose isn't San Francisco, et cetera, et cetera. But are there areas to you that have the feeling of another city? For me, although it wasn't Houston proper, Pasadena really felt like Baton Rouge. Bumpy elevated highways. Low-rise buildings along the frontage roads (not strip centers), and the presence of oil refineries.

A bit nostalgic for me, at least.

What about you? Any parts of Houston that remind you of somewhere else, another city, anywhere?

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Driving through the back roads in the Memorial villages (Bunker Hill Village et al) reminds me of the back roads of Vinings in Atlanta.

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The Heights reminds me of parts of Victoria, British Columbia.....but with no ocean....or mountains....and with additional crime and littering.

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Parts of Dowling Street between 45 and Wheeler remind me of the area around W. 47th and S. Prairie in Chicago.

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Not a personal observation; there was some movie shot in Houston in the late 80's - early 90's which was set in Los Angeles in the 30's - and the Heights looked more like LA than LA did.

edit: Amazing to me, that according to the new HBO mini-series "Mildred Pierce"'s trailer, the producers found neighborhoods on Long Island and Peekskill NY which were appropriate to evoke the setting of early 30's Los Angeles.

Lovett Blvd was used as a stand-in for Washington DC in the movie Warning: Parental Avisory

Edited by dbigtex56

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Sometimes when I'm driving down the freeway at dawn or dusk and there is a sheet of clouds from the horizon on up, it feels like there are Mountains in the distance if you visualize hard enough. It looks like you're driving towards the base of one.

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OK, we all know that Rice Village isn't going to be Greenwich Village, downtown Houston isn't Manhattan, Montrose isn't San Francisco, et cetera, et cetera. But are there areas to you that have the feeling of another city? For me, although it wasn't Houston proper, Pasadena really felt like Baton Rouge. Bumpy elevated highways. Low-rise buildings along the frontage roads (not strip centers), and the presence of oil refineries.

A bit nostalgic for me, at least.

What about you? Any parts of Houston that remind you of somewhere else, another city, anywhere?

Near-north Baton Rouge? Didn't know you had ties to my hometown. Maybe I need to check out Pasadena and judge for myself.

Sometimes Memorial Park reminds me of a national forest/park in Mississippi with all the pines.

Lots of places around here remind me of Louisiana because it's basically the same landscape.

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Near-north Baton Rouge? Didn't know you had ties to my hometown. Maybe I need to check out Pasadena and judge for myself.

Sometimes Memorial Park reminds me of a national forest/park in Mississippi with all the pines.

Lots of places around here remind me of Louisiana because it's basically the same landscape.

My uncle lives in Baton Rouge (eastern part), and I traveled across the Mississippi River bridge many, many times to visit him.

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Ride your bike around North and Northeast downtown (near the jail)... it completely reminds me of Brooklyn.

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Ride your bike around North and Northeast downtown (near the jail)... it completely reminds me of Brooklyn.

as I have never been to brooklyn, this is a serious question.

are you reminded because of the way it looks, or the way it smells?

take a ride down san jac, once you cross the railroad tracks, the stench of stale urine is overpowering, and pretty much only reminds me of a bathroom with a toilet that hasn't been flushed in days.

Edited by samagon

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The Heights reminds me of parts of Victoria, British Columbia.....but with no ocean....or mountains....and with additional crime and littering.

... and without funny accents...

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Southwest Houston, west of Hillcroft, reminds me of a dark alley on a back street in Acapulco.

I was going to say Matamoros but close enough.

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What about you? Any parts of Houston that remind you of somewhere else, another city, anywhere?

I was prowling around down in the Bayview/Bacliff area earlier today and realized that the Galveston Bay communities really are their own cultural region, unique within the United States or the world. And each of the little municipalities has a highly distinct identity. In particular, the extreme diversity of white people is staggering.

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The general Heights area reminds me of the Ohio City area of Cleveland, Oh. If I only had the good sense to buy in the Heights when I got to Houston in '84.

Edited by west20th

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Parts of Dowling Street between 45 and Wheeler remind me of the area around W. 47th and S. Prairie in Chicago.

I wholly agree, don't leave out Harvey, IL and Calumet City, IL (neighboring cities to the Chicago's South Side...not too far from 47th and S. Prairie) that look just like north and northeast Houston (i.e. from Yale St./Tidwell Rd. in Independence heights to Tidwell Rd./Homestead Rd. down to 610)...Check out this google street view and drive down Wood st. (going south) and judge for yourself!

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&sugexp=ldymls&xhr=t&q=harvey+il&cp=10&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=Harvey,+IL&gl=us&ei=MD2TTfeZIIXj0gHOw_jMBw&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=image&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CCgQ8gEwAA

here's tidwell/lockwood:

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&sugexp=ldymls&xhr=t&q=harvey+il&cp=10&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=Harvey,+IL&gl=us&ei=MD2TTfeZIIXj0gHOw_jMBw&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=image&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CCgQ8gEwAA

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Pearland reminds me of Plano/Frisco. Same thing. Unfortunately, so does the new Bunker Hill/I-10 mega shopping center. Big box hell. I mean, I shop there for some stuff, but the place is way annoying.

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I'm no world traveler, but I've been to and spent time in most of the US's major cities. I've tried hard to come up with something, but in general I can't think of any part of Houston that looks a lot like somewhere else. Maybe some of the sprawlier parts of LA, but even then the light is totally different.

Most of the other big cities in this country had the bulk of their growth pre-WWII, pre-freeway, and pre-air-conditioning. Generally that means a lot more older buildings, especially apartments and commercial buildings, than in Houston, and for me that's the biggest difference. That and at least somewhat plentiful parking almost everywhere.

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The Woodlands reminds me of the northern part of the Atlanta metro area, up around Dunwoody and East Cobb. Mainly due to the pine trees and the rolling nature of the land. Parts of Bellaire, starting near the Gulfton area and continuing west through the Bellaire Chinatown remind me of Buford Highway in Atlanta, though the Asian component of Buford Highway is a pale shadow of what it was when I lived there in the 90's and an even paler shadow of what the Bellaire Chinatown is now.

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I was prowling around down in the Bayview/Bacliff area earlier today and realized that the Galveston Bay communities really are their own cultural region, unique within the United States or the world. And each of the little municipalities has a highly distinct identity. In particular, the extreme diversity of white people is staggering.

What? Did you encounter Thurston and Lovey sipping cocktails at Texas Corinthian Yacht Club, or was it Bubba feeding red meat to his pit bulls behind the group of run down mobile homes.

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What? Did you encounter Thurston and Lovey sipping cocktails at Texas Corinthian Yacht Club, or was it Bubba feeding red meat to his pit bulls behind the group of run down mobile homes.

All of the above and some wiggers, dining at Las Brisas.

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Visited the Heights for the first time yesterday (Penzeys Spices, specifically). It did remind me a bit of the part of Baton Rouge where my uncle lives (will be moving out soon): lots of trees, relatively narrow paved roads (Heights roads seemed to be narrower, at least the part near the old railroad spur), and even battered stop signs. It seems every stop sign in the Heights was damaged somehow: bent, scratched, vandalized, or something (just like in BR!)

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It seems every stop sign in the Heights was damaged somehow: bent, scratched, vandalized, or something (just like in BR!)

Is the detailed observation of comparative neighborhood transportation infrastructure really such a defining element of tourism for you?

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Is the detailed observation of comparative neighborhood transportation infrastructure really such a defining element of tourism for you?

That is part of it. Though I would say Baton Rouge, at least the area I was thinking of, has wider roads. To be honest, though, I didn't spend that much time there, rode in a car, went over the railroads at T.C. Jester, went on a couple of roads, stopped at the spice shop, passed Restaurant Depot on the way out. I didn't even get to see Heights Boulevard, and only went on Nicholson. It would be unfair to say that ALL of the Heights represents what I saw, just one part of it.

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