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ricco67

New Walmart being built on I-45 Gulf Freeway at Wayside in East Side Houston

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Any news on this?? I pass by it daily and they have seemed to have stopped any kind of construction. They have already torn down all the buildings, looks a lot better!! I just cant imagine there being enough space for the walmart there now that its bare.

Anyone have an update?

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Well one thing's for sure... it's not likely to have any of the "accompanying retail" that we've seen to wall in the Heights Walmart. At 185,000 sq. ft. on a relatively small parcel, they can't build much more than the store itself, and parking.

Last I heard, it was supposed to open "mid 2013" but I guess they're running behind schedule now.

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made a point to look yesterday as I drove home, still a desolate landscape of nothing. I wonder if they decided that there was too much pushback from inner loop residents in Houston and chose to leave the Yale street walmart as the only inner loop location?

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made a point to look yesterday as I drove home, still a desolate landscape of nothing. I wonder if they decided that there was too much pushback from inner loop residents in Houston and chose to leave the Yale street walmart as the only inner loop location?

Doubt it. They have pretty much received zero pushback from the area, other than requests from Idylwood for security/fencing, and more trees. The delay is likely nothing to be concerned about.

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What pushback? Sure, some residents complained, wrote mean things on internet forums, and even created a facebook page. But, the end result was a new Walmart on Yale without even having to defend a lawsuit. No political figures lost reelection. They even got a new road and sidewalks out of the deal. Why would that deter them from building in an area where even more of the residents want it?

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We in Idylwood have not heard anything recently. Some are concerned about property values, that's true. But, we have found that actually working *with* Walmart is more conducive to good relations than trying to create a rukus that benefits no one.

I'm of the opinion that Walmart will get their way eventually. The main thing I and some of my immediate neighbors can hope for is that TxDot will see fit to put in a left turn lane for the folks coming from Harrisburg towards I-45. That stretch of Wayside, once the road changes from 2 one ways at Polk, (Wayside and S/Sgt. Marcario Garcia, formerly 69th St.) into a simple undivided 4 lane US Hwy (Wayside) is already backed up almost to Harrisburg during rush hour.

Before Walmart even completed the purchase of the Oshman's properties, at a civic club meeting we were told that TxDot would not get involved BEFORE a deal was finalized. Or, I should say, I was told that by a representative of our state rep's office who was in contact with a rep from TxDot. Yeah, I know, try tracking that one.

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The city and/or TexDot should make Wamart fund the improvements to Wayside that are needed for traffic control.

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I noticed on my drive home from work Friday that there are stakes in the ground, and small earth moving equipment as well. Maybe they're going to start work soon?

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That is correct! Dirt is being moved and they have now moved the fence to the corner of wayside/45 instead of around that squared corner.

 

Traffic is already backing up, and its only dump-trucks in the area.

 

 

 

I noticed on my drive home from work Friday that there are stakes in the ground, and small earth moving equipment as well. Maybe they're going to start work soon?

 

 

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More pics.

Not quite Jax quality, but whatever. smile.gif

I haven't been down this road in since this fence has been built. Maybe 20 yrs ago?

From Google Maps, I thought this was a way in and out, but I was surprised to find a fence with openings open only for pedestrians. Believe it or not, I saw quite a bit of auto traffic as people were either picking up or dropping people off.

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This is the very back of it property. The security seemed to be a bit concerned about my taking pics of the property, but I just waved at him in a friendly manner and smiled.

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This is across the street. I'm assuming this is part of the school there, but I don't now.

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What caught my eye though was the art on the docking side, and decided to take as many detailed pictures, including the dedications and thanks of the various sponsors. Might as well let this live online at least.

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This is the wayside st. part of the property. Kinda' wonder if that hotel will survive.

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This is across the street. This strip is almost totally vacant and will be interesting to visit this site in a year or so.

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That strip was built in a bad location. Whoever decided this would work there is in the wrong business.

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Will the derilict billboard next to Aranda's, a leaning skeleton since Hurricane Alicia, finally come down? Please!

 

A couple of weeks ago, I saw some bucket trucks by that billboard. It has been completely reworked and is now standing tall and upright, awaiting new business.

 

There are other signs still standing though.  Does anyone know anything about sign ownership?  Do they go with the land or remain the property of whomever paid for them?

 

As far as cut through traffic on Maxwell to Sylvan, it's not possible at this point.  Idylwood paid for a gate across Maxwell quite a few years ago.  Lee Brown was mayor.  Last we heard, the gate will remain.  Maxwell itself is in pretty sad shape along there too.  Many deep potholes that do not get city attention.

 

All the old palm trees and oaks that were on the Holiday Inn site are gone.

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No pictures, but it's amazing how quickly they are building it. Appears to be cinder block (or some type of brick) construction rather than those concrete wall thingies. 

 

Most of the basic structure appears to be in place.

Edited by samagon

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No pictures, but it's amazing how quickly they are building it. Appears to be cinder block (or some type of brick) construction rather than those concrete wall thingies.

Most of the basic structure appears to be in place.

Walmart seems to favor cinder block construction. We've got a Sam's going up near us at Eldridge and Richmond and it's block construction as well. I've also seen two other Walmarts go up on the west side of town, both block construction. I don't know enough about commercial building to know why they do it that way vs solid concrete wall, though, but I'd guess it's either cost related or perhaps easier to do with a lesser skilled crew. Edited by august948

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Walmart seems to favor cinder block construction. We've got a Sam's going up near us at Eldridge and Richmond and it's block construction as well. I've also seen two other Walmarts go up on the west side of town, both block construction. I don't know enough about commercial building to know why they do it that way vs solid concrete wall, though, but I'd guess it's either cost related or perhaps easier to do with a lesser skilled crew.

 

You are completely correct about the "lesser skilled crew." Tilt-wall construction (pouring the walls on top of the floor slab and lifting them into place with a crane once the concrete has set) is efficient and makes for a very strong building. It is a good way to enclose a lot of space quickly and with minimum cost.

 

That said, depending on the size of the project and the availability of a crane and its operator (and remember there is a lot of construction going on in this city right now) it may be expedient to stack concrete masonry units (yeah, that's jargon for what we all grew up calling cinder blocks).

 

Sometimes too a slightly higher construction cost, whether it is driven by materials or labor costs or  both, can be justified by the amount of time saved. This is especially important with a project such as a retail establishment since it doesn't start making money until it is open to the public and selling goods.

 

By the way, CMU construction can be very strong if the holes in the block contain reinforcing steel and grout. They then begin to behave almost exactly as a solid concrete slab.

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By the way, CMU construction can be very strong if the holes in the block contain reinforcing steel and grout. They then begin to behave almost exactly as a solid concrete slab.

Do they just drop the steel in (rebar?) or do they also fill it in with something else (concrete, insulating foam, etc.)?

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Do they just drop the steel in (rebar?) or do they also fill it in with something else (concrete, insulating foam, etc.)?

 

August, the holes (cells) with are filled with a grout that is essentially concrete with smaller aggregate so it can be placed easily. Think pea gravel instead of rocks the size of robin's eggs or larger. The height of the wall and the lateral force it is required to resist determines whether all the cells, every other cell, or fewer must be reinforced.

 

I would be very confident riding out a severe storm (even a tornado) in a small building of reinforced CMU with a concrete slab roof. High wind not only tears apart a building through its own force (positive and negative pressure) but also hurls objects into the structure with tremendous force.

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August, the holes (cells) with are filled with a grout that is essentially concrete with smaller aggregate so it can be placed easily. Think pea gravel instead of rocks the size of robin's eggs or larger. The height of the wall and the lateral force it is required to resist determines whether all the cells, every other cell, or fewer must be reinforced.

 

I would be very confident riding out a severe storm (even a tornado) in a small building of reinforced CMU with a concrete slab roof. High wind not only tears apart a building through its own force (positive and negative pressure) but also hurls objects into the structure with tremendous force.

Thanks for the info. When you said grout earlier I was thinking of around the edges like tiles instead of large quantities in the middle.

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Thanks for the info. When you said grout earlier I was thinking of around the edges like tiles instead of large quantities in the middle.

 

It is confusing that the same term is used for the two materials. Then there is leveling grout which is used under the plates at the bottom of steel columns where they rest on a concrete footing or slab. I will leave it to Drake to elaborate on that as I'm sure this thread has brought back some wonderful memories of his days at A&M. :)

 

As you may deduce from my user name I am a construction specification writer by vocation. Early on it is drummed into every spec writers head that the 4 C's of good specification writing dictate they must be clear, correct, complete, and concise. This has probably caused many people I work with to consider me a bit of a nudnik. I am, at least as it concerns my work. Otherwise I am really a free spirit. :lol:

 

BTW, to get back to the original question: CMU walls can be erected fairly quickly. There is some skill required in keeping the lines level and placing the mortar joints with the proper thickness and amount of mortar but many people can learn this with enough practice and good attention to their work. One advantage of this construction type is the ability to have several crews working on different parts of the building at the same time.

Edited by Specwriter

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Early on it is drummed into every spec writers head that the 4 C's of good specification writing dictate they must be clear, correct, complete, and concise. This has probably caused many people I work with to consider me a bit of a nudnik. I am, at least as it concerns my work. Otherwise I am really a free spirit. :lol:

 

I prefer construction pedant.     ;)

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I prefer construction pedant.     ;)

 

Believe it or not, Red, I was thinking just this morning that my last post did seem a bit pedantic. As you are an attorney you would no doubt recognize this being so. ;) We were also told, "Specifications usually aren't read on the job site. They are read in the courtroom."

 

I do apologize but I get so enthusiastic when someone else expresses and interest in the how and why of different construction methods.

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No need to apologize at all. I enjoyed the terminology lesson. My first career prior to law school was in construction, and I have a lasting fascination with it. And, I must admit, as a longtime fan of the late William Safire's column on language, I was impressed with your use of the term nudnik.

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No need to apologize at all. I enjoyed the terminology lesson. My first career prior to law school was in construction, and I have a lasting fascination with it. And, I must admit, as a longtime fan of the late William Safire's column on language, I was impressed with your use of the term nudnik.

 

I also really enjoy Safire's columns. He was a great journalist. Another great volume on the subject is the late commentator Edwin Newman's Strictly Speaking: Will America be the Death of English. It was first published in the early 1970's but is still available used. Mr. Newman lived until 2010 but I'm not sure if he made subsequent revisions to the book to reflect the advances in technology and the wonderful ways those advances affected our language. I read a first edition which I found at a garage sales a few years ago.

 

As the person who oversees written specifications for construction projects and ensures other documents are coordinated with them, I am the de facto quality assurance guy on the project team so nudnik is an apt summary of my role.

 

Everyday English has benefited greatly from the tongues of our ancestors.

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