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2010 US Census

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Results will be reveald tomorrow, 10/21

It looks like it will only be national and state populations...when will they reveal city, county etc?

http://www.census.gov/

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I guess the city populations will be released in February.

Texas topped the 25 million mark and led the nation in population growth over the last decade, adding 4,293,741 new residents, according to 2010 Census numbers released today. The Lone Star state’s population jumped to 25,145,561 million, a 20.6 percent increase from 2000,

Read more: http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/12/21/2720043/texas-population-tops-25-million.html#ixzz18loULr54

The census bureau will reveal detailed state counts starting in February.

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Well, according to the Wall street Journal, it seems that chicago reached 1920's level in its population. The census says that the current population is 2,695,598; a 6.9% decrease.

Kinda makes me wonder what kind of shot we have at passing them this decade, but the WSJ seems confident that they will remain #3.

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Well, according to the Wall street Journal, it seems that chicago reached 1920's level in its population. The census says that the current population is 2,695,598; a 6.9% decrease. Kinda makes me wonder what kind of shot we have at passing them this decade, but the WSJ seems confident that they will remain #3. Link
I never understood why humans remain in freezing climates when our bodies are not designed for them. Cold can literally make body parts fall off. I'll take a humid Houston over a freezing Chicago any day. Maybe people are slowly realizing that there are jobs in better climates. Edited by brian0123

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I never understood why humans remain in freezing climates when our bodies are not designed for them. Cold can literally make body parts fall off. I'll take a humid Houston over a freezing Chicago any day. Maybe people are slowly realizing that there are jobs in better climates.

This post reminds me of the myriad posts we see (usually in the summer)claiming that Houston weather is not conducive to pedestrian activity. They commonly follow the theme that one can dress for the cold, but not the heat and humidity. Every time I saw Chicago or New York buried under 20 inches or more, I imagined the residents "dressing for the cold", attempting to walk to the bus or subway in leather shoes.

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Well, according to the Wall street Journal, it seems that chicago reached 1920's level in its population. The census says that the current population is 2,695,598; a 6.9% decrease.

Kinda makes me wonder what kind of shot we have at passing them this decade, but the WSJ seems confident that they will remain #3.

Link

The population figures for cities in Texas were released today. We're now just short of 2.1 million people, still #1 in Texas. As the WSJ predicted in the Chicago article, we're still at #4 in the nation. San Antonio took the #2 spot from Dallas, and Ft. Worth posted the biggest state population gain with 38.6%.

http://www.texastribune.org/texas-counties-and-demographics/census/2010-census-data-for-texas-released-/

Edited by JLWM8609

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The population figures for cities in Texas were released today. We're now just short of 2.1 million people, still #1 in Texas. As the WSJ predicted in the Chicago article, we're still at #4 in the nation. San Antonio took the #2 spot from Dallas, and Ft. Worth posted the biggest state population gain with 38.6%.

http://www.texastrib...exas-released-/

Citiy Pops, not MSA

Houston : Up approx 145,820 (+7.5%) to 2,099,451

Chicago : Down approx 199,900 (- 6.9%) to 2,695,598

Still separated by nearly 600k

With those numbers, It sure makes the old "Houston to #3" debates seem rather silly.

With those rates.. We're not even passing Chicago by the 2020 Census.

And honestly, maybe I'm looking at the numbers wrong. But our 10 yr increase of 145k seems very low. Where did all our N.O. residents wander off to ?

At their July 2006 ( Half Decade? ) estimates, the census had us at 2,144,491, which means

a ) Houston has lost lost population the last 5 years.

b ) The Census' half decade estimates are way off.

c ) The Census really has no clue what they are doing and the numbers are all made up.

d ) I screwed up the numbers.

I thought we passed philadelphia and were now number 3?

You are confusing City populations with MSA rankings.

We might well have passed Phili in the MSA rankings, but that would make us #5

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The 2010 Census numbers are about 150K off from the 2009 estimates, for the City of Houston. People not participating is my reasoning. Now, the Houston metro did slightly better than expected. Austin and San Antonio were right around where they expected. DFW underperformed, according to the Census, and Houston hasn't been this close to it in metro population for about 25 years. I see a lot of cities appealing this Census (as usual...).

Edited by Trae

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The 2010 Census numbers are about 150K off from the 2009 estimates, for the City of Houston. People not participating is my reasoning. Now, the Houston metro did slightly better than expected. Austin and San Antonio were right around where they expected. DFW underperformed, according to the Census, and Houston hasn't been this close to it in metro population for about 25 years. I see a lot of cities appealing this Census (as usual...).

http://swamplot.com/new-2010-census-numbers-document-houstons-trickle-in-decade/2011-02-17/ here's the link from swamplot.

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The 2010 Census numbers are about 150K off from the 2009 estimates, for the City of Houston. People not participating is my reasoning. Now, the Houston metro did slightly better than expected. Austin and San Antonio were right around where they expected. DFW underperformed, according to the Census, and Houston hasn't been this close to it in metro population for about 25 years. I see a lot of cities appealing this Census (as usual...).

Having been both a Census Enumerator involved in both the Group Quarters and Non-Response Follow Up operation, my concern would be an overcount. Not just in Houston, but nationally.

In the group quarters operations, the ratio of enumerators to homeless people was typically from about 2:1 to 4:1, and if someone refused to participate for any reason, we were to "self-enumerate" them. So there was lots of double-counting, probably some triple- and quadruple-counting. Some of the operations also overlapped, such as the daytime soup kitchen counts, the counts at homeless shelters, and the count conducted outdoors during the nighttime (where different enumerator teams often wandered into other teams' territory by accident or because they were bored).

As for NRFU, there were so many extra and incorrect addresses on the list (vacant homes, demolished homes, or non-residential addresses) and those cases received so much follow-on by team...after team...after team...of whom many were willing to take information by proxy...it almost seemed as though the idea was to keep asking "proxies" whether a home was occupied on April 1st until one of them screwed up and said yes. Likewise, although there was training for enumerators to ask about cases where people might have moved, few enumerators actually did this in practice.

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Houston is challenging the numbers.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/7442563.html

The city of Houston will ask the
to change its official
, raising questions about whether some
complexes or even entire neighborhoods were missed.

Houston's population is 2,099,451, according to Census data released last week. That's more than 100,000 fewer people than earlier estimates, and slightly below the 2.1 million that triggers an expansion of
to 16 members.

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Having been both a Census Enumerator involved in both the Group Quarters and Non-Response Follow Up operation, my concern would be an overcount. Not just in Houston, but nationally.

In the group quarters operations, the ratio of enumerators to homeless people was typically from about 2:1 to 4:1, and if someone refused to participate for any reason, we were to "self-enumerate" them. So there was lots of double-counting, probably some triple- and quadruple-counting. Some of the operations also overlapped, such as the daytime soup kitchen counts, the counts at homeless shelters, and the count conducted outdoors during the nighttime (where different enumerator teams often wandered into other teams' territory by accident or because they were bored).

As for NRFU, there were so many extra and incorrect addresses on the list (vacant homes, demolished homes, or non-residential addresses) and those cases received so much follow-on by team...after team...after team...of whom many were willing to take information by proxy...it almost seemed as though the idea was to keep asking "proxies" whether a home was occupied on April 1st until one of them screwed up and said yes. Likewise, although there was training for enumerators to ask about cases where people might have moved, few enumerators actually did this in practice.

Your point is well taken. It's entirely possible - in fact certain - that some people were counted more than once.

There are also a significant number of people who were determined not to be enumerated, whether through fear of deportation or ignorance. Many people are unaware that the Census is constitutionally mandated, and think that the Census is just another Obama Big Government Plot.

To count the population of a city is to aim at a moving target. In my mind, the over and undercounted cancel each other out.

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The part about East Houston inside the Loop losing population is highly unlikely. Every census tract apparently showed a population decline. There's NO WAY that the area between UH/Maxwell House and Downtown LOST POPULATION over the course of the last decade. There have been thousands of housing units built on vacant lots and empty warehouses have been turned into numerous lofts.

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Your point is well taken. It's entirely possible - in fact certain - that some people were counted more than once.

There are also a significant number of people who were determined not to be enumerated, whether through fear of deportation or ignorance. Many people are unaware that the Census is constitutionally mandated, and think that the Census is just another Obama Big Government Plot.

To count the population of a city is to aim at a moving target. In my mind, the over and undercounted cancel each other out.

Nope. If we could talk to them or observe them at all, or get one of their neighbors to say that they lived there on April 1st, they got counted. And if we couldn't figure out anything about them other than that the housing unit was occupied, then the statisticians would assign them average household characteristics by default (which in my view was typically overestimating the number of people in a household characterized by paranoia).

If there is any concern over an undercount, it would be that some structures that appear to be commercial are actually residential and didn't get picked up by the folks that did address canvasing. I probably found about a couple dozen people that way, through word-of-mouth, and primarily by interviewing the ever-helpful neighborhood prostitute.

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The part about East Houston inside the Loop losing population is highly unlikely. Every census tract apparently showed a population decline. There's NO WAY that the area between UH/Maxwell House and Downtown LOST POPULATION over the course of the last decade. There have been thousands of housing units built on vacant lots and empty warehouses have been turned into numerous lofts.

It said "much of east Houston". I can believe that.

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If there is any concern over an undercount, it would be that some structures that appear to be commercial are actually residential and didn't get picked up by the folks that did address canvasing. I probably found about a couple dozen people that way, through word-of-mouth, and primarily by interviewing the ever-helpful neighborhood prostitute.

Your Paphian contacts notwithstanding, please address the issue that many people do choose to remain uncounted.

edit: definition for Paphian added: cool word, eh?

Edited by dbigtex56

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Your Paphian contacts notwithstanding, please address the issue that many people do choose to remain uncounted.

I already did! They only think that they have chosen to remain uncounted. In fact, if a succession of several teams visiting three times each can't get their information from their neighbor, the postman, an apartment manager, or the neighborhood whore...but...if there's any evidence of physical occupancy then it results in their being over-counted due to statistical methods.

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